#1
I think I'm starting to understand music theory but I wanting to make sure I'm getting this right, so this is what I know so far:

If you want to play a solo or riff in key with the song, you can use a scale starting with the key note: such as if a song is in B, you start with a B note on the scale and then you go through the scale with that as the starting note

and....

Playing a chord progression in a certain key i.e. if you were in the key of C you could play these chords CDEFGABC but certain ones of those are major, minor, and diminished, so the chord progression will change if you change the key.

Well, I'm only starting out on music theory so if I'm wrong on any of this, please correct me. I don't want to get off on the wrong foot. Thanks.
#2
your getting it just know that you dont have to start on the root note as long as the root note is what your resolving to
#3
^^^ so I can start on any note and use a scale as long as I finish with the root note of the key? sorry if this sounds stupid but, how would that make a solo be in key with the song?
#4
Quote by omotog
^^^ so I can start on any note and use a scale as long as I finish with the root note of the key? sorry if this sounds stupid but, how would that make a solo be in key with the song?


It depends, while you're getting used to the notes and keys at first you will gravitate towards the root, but eventually you'll want to start with other chord tones like the third and connect them leading into the next chord's tones.

So like if you have a chord progression:

Cmaj Gmaj Amin Fmaj

It's in the key of C so you can use the key of C major : CDEFGAB

Then you break the chords down:

CEG

GBD

ACE

FAC

So you'd start with those notes and lead up with the notes in Cmajor to the next chord's notes. You should avoid starting too much with the root though because it will make you sound like a bassline and you wont feel like flowing on to the next chord. Same thing for ending on the tonic, C in this case. Finishing a phrase on the tonic or sometimes even the root of the chord will make it sound like you finished the song and you'll stall since it will be harder to start the flow up again.

So aim to start with the 3rds and 5ths and find ways using the scale of Cmajor to connect to the 3rds and 5th of the next chord. Also keep in mind you dont and shouldnt have to play a straight non stop line, make sure you leave spaces and start at different beats on the bars.
Last edited by Pillo114 at Jul 23, 2010,
#5
Quote by supersac
your getting it just know that you dont have to start on the root note as long as the root note is what your resolving to


Omotog, there's really not much we can say here without giving you a headache. I suggest learning your minor pentatonic if you haven't already then checking out the blues station on Shoutcast. See if you can make the scale fit the music. And as a rule of thumb:

C minor pentatonic = Key of C major

A minor pentatonic = A major

E minor pentatonic = E major


And so forth. It's but an ear thing. Music wasn't created from theory.
Cmaj9add4add6(b13)(b5)
#6
Quote by omotog
^^^ so I can start on any note and use a scale as long as I finish with the root note of the key? sorry if this sounds stupid but, how would that make a solo be in key with the song?
You can start and end on completely random notes (we'll choose 7 and 2) and it'll still support the key. The reason for this is that if you're doing it right, you'll feel a pull to the root. Whether you utilize that pull or not is completely irrelevant. You can end songs unresolved. As long as you can feel that pull towards the root/tonic, you're doing it right.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea