#1
Q.1) how do i keep time at high speeds like 16ths or 32nds at 180+ bpm without a metronome or anything like that (like on stage [live])

Q.2) how do i keep time with triplets, and quintuplets and sextuplets and septuplets and umm... nontuplets (9) at semiquavers at around 140-200bpm. so each note is evenly spread out in that group of notes.

even a metronome conversion would help e.g. 130bpm semi-quavers is the same as 100bpm demi-semi-quavers and 130bpm semiquavers umm...something like 125, 115, 95 bpm or something at triplets
#3
Quote by Livingtime
Q.2) how do i keep time with triplets, and quintuplets and sextuplets and septuplets and umm... nontuplets (9) at semiquavers at around 140-200bpm. so each note is evenly spread out in that group of notes.


Stop thinking about "metronome conversions" or anything like that, practice playing those groups to a metronome using that number of notes per beat until it's easy for you to do so. In my opinion groups like 5 and 7 will always take some thought because they're such unusual numbers to work in but it'll get easier if you actually practice it.

Also +1 to what SeeEmilyPlay said about drummers, that how people keep time on stage - everyone plays to the drummer. If you're playing live and the drummer goes out of time you should follow them because if everything goes out of time people assume the drummer is the one doing it right.
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#4
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Stop thinking about "metronome conversions" or anything like that, practice playing those groups to a metronome using that number of notes per beat until it's easy for you to do so. In my opinion groups like 5 and 7 will always take some thought because they're such unusual numbers to work in but it'll get easier if you actually practice it.

Also +1 to what SeeEmilyPlay said about drummers, that how people keep time on stage - everyone plays to the drummer. If you're playing live and the drummer goes out of time you should follow them because if everything goes out of time people assume the drummer is the one doing it right.



know any methods on how to count tuplets? (groups of notes)

also about how the drummer keeps time what if i do a codenza solo where there is no drums?

e.g. eruption by van halen, frenzy by racer x
#5
If you do a solo where there is no drums then no one is gonna know if you go out of time. When EVH plays Eruption sometimes it is a minute thirty and sometimes it is a minute fifty, still sounds amazing
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#6
Quote by Livingtime
know any methods on how to count tuplets? (groups of notes)

also about how the drummer keeps time what if i do a codenza solo where there is no drums?

e.g. eruption by van halen, frenzy by racer x


Yeah... numbers. slow down to the point where you can count it either out loud or in your head and stay at that speed until you don't have to count any more then speed up, if you can do it slowly without counting then doing it quicker should be easy.

Also agreed with sammo_boi, if there are no drums then going out of time isn't exactly possible is it? If there's an unaccompanied section of a song in the middle and it's vital you come back in time and the drummer's playing to a click it gets more difficult but that hardly ever happens anyway.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.