#1
Hey guys, just want to know opinions on how generic this riff is and how I could go about improving it?

Thank you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7KoUm1TEQ0E
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#2
When I saw 'metalcore' in the title, my instant reaction was 'yes'.


Then I watched the video.


And my answer remains yes.
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#3
Sorry to say but that's the bog standard metalcore riff that every shitty metalcore band recycles over and over again. I love metalcore, just the more technical, not so generic part of it.

[EDIT]

You could improve in a lot of areas.

Get to know your fretboard, don't be afraid to move out of the 0-0-5-7-0-0-8 mould.

Fiddle with various time signatures, learn more difficult songs. You'll discover a "why the hell did I not write that?" outlook on things. This gives you the incentive to broaden your guitar capabilties to write better, less generic riffs.

I'm sure after a few months you'll be well on your way dude
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Last edited by Adam124 at Jul 23, 2010,
#4
On a scale of genericness... 9/10

It would've been 10/10 if the quality was a bit better.
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#5
Yeah, I did say. I wrote it in about 5 mins. xD. So yeah, it's not up to par with some of the other stuff I have written, but time signatures? what sort should I be messing about with?
Bass Gear:

Mensinger: Speesy
Fender Precision 1989 (CIJ Rosewood)
Fender Steve Harris (CIJ)
Lakland J Sonic 5
Epiphone Explorer
Maruszczyk (custom) Jake

Ashdown CTM 100
#6
Yeah, that riff totally sounds like Cloud Connected by In Flames.

You, good sir, have not gone over to your friends house after a hard night of drinking to find 2 dudes passed out in the same room both holding their own flaccid cocks in hand, passed out, with porn on the tv.
#7
Quote by RisingForce1990
Yeah, that riff totally sounds like Cloud Connected by In Flames.


I've not heard that song or any inflames actually.
Bass Gear:

Mensinger: Speesy
Fender Precision 1989 (CIJ Rosewood)
Fender Steve Harris (CIJ)
Lakland J Sonic 5
Epiphone Explorer
Maruszczyk (custom) Jake

Ashdown CTM 100
#9
I was at this road at one point with writing and it can be a hard mold to break. It's important to experiment though. Different scales, sometimes hitting "wrong" notes can be right It all depends on how you use it. These "wrong" notes can cause neccesary "tension" in the music that metalcore ofter ignores.

I may get flamed. but LoG and Slayer (2 quick examples) have made this style their livelyhood.

What do you think of mine?
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1341315

Enjoy
#10
Yeah, I keep writing in that mold. How do I break it?
Bass Gear:

Mensinger: Speesy
Fender Precision 1989 (CIJ Rosewood)
Fender Steve Harris (CIJ)
Lakland J Sonic 5
Epiphone Explorer
Maruszczyk (custom) Jake

Ashdown CTM 100
#11
Quote by Fisheth24
Yeah, I keep writing in that mold. How do I break it?


listening to other music, playing other instruments - styles - genres, what have you.

The only reason half the time I'm able to write most of what I ...write :P is because I normally compose strictly on either my DAW, or on another instrument. Then simply transcribe it to guitar w/e parts I wrote for it. I certainly don't feel hindered by my playing ability when I do it this way, despite how many years I've (not) put into it, I'm still not as great as I'd like to be on the guitar.

You're going to sound similar to alot of stuff along the way, until you get some experience writing and keeping your mind active and aware/exploring other things in and outside of music. Of course this concerns listening to the same damned genre or artist over and over again, instead of branching out some.
Last edited by Night at Jul 23, 2010,
#12
Quote by Night
listening to other music, playing other instruments - styles - genres, what have you.


Yes, exactly. Whenever I feel like everything I've been writing is cookie-cutter shit that's been done over and over - I drop the guitar and go mess with something else. I don't play any metal anymore, it's been quite a few years, so this usually means picking up a mandolin. It's all the same though, really. Music is music and you shouldn't stick to just playing metalcore (not saying you do, maybe you don't).
It really helps to draw influences from EVERYTHING. This is what I've learned.
Also, play with other people and see their takes on the most basic of stuff. Playing with whoever you can will give you ideas on doing something new just by seeing a new outlook on it.
#14
Yeah, it is. A great way to break out of the generic arena is with chromaticism, so consider throwing a random note in that riff, to pull the listeners attention away to the generic part of the riff, an to the note(s) that are inconsistent to what's around them, but remember to have all guitars play that note; harmonizing it can destroy any strength or relation you have to a key.

Crit my piece?
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1342182