#1
So basically, here's my predicament. I recently started an Alternative/Post-Punk Revival band with some friends from school, all members are only thirteen. Although - without attempting to be smug - we possess of decent talent, but we would probably find it very hard to get local recognition, due to our genre and our age. We don't intend on doing this for a living as we need to dedicate academic time, but we do intend on taking this project serious and dedicating time and money into it. We're currently in the process of compiling an E.P. which should be released later on within the winter.

But to be honest, all this seems useless if we clearly cannot do what would be the best way to give us a fan base or a sense of local recognition, gigging. We have got the school alternative, but of course, as we're beginning to record and such, we want to develop our gigging further, especially since doing gigs at schools will barely be of any help to a bands reputation. The vast majority of gigs occur at small time festivals or bars/pubs, which of course we cannot accomplish for two reasons, our age and the fact that we're situated in South London and the music scene isn't very welcoming to our genre.

I really do think that this could potentially be a beneficial experience and could help us develop musically and as a band, but at our age we would find it exceedingly hard to distribute music and play at gigs. As I said, we write our own music, we're considerably good for our age and are in the process of recording an E.P., but we're completely stumped on how to find a gig or get our music across in any other method that would get us recognition as a band. We do not really care too much about the financial aspect of the band, we do not intend on gaining profit from it.

So the almighty wise members of U.G., if in my band's shoes, what would you do? Have you got any recommendations on what we could do to distribute our music? Are there any possible gigs we take up on at our age?

Sorry for the essay, your help is appreciated.
#4

I have found a member of UG younger than myself who can use grammar properly.
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Sorry.

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#5
Quote by treepoop

I have found a member of UG younger than myself who can use grammar properly.


wtf iz grammer dood?

Anyway, back on topic.
#6
Go for the festivals, who cares if the festival caters to your genre or not. If the festival is well attended then you will likely win over a few fans. As for bars it won't hurt to ask, maybe you can make a deal with the owners so you can play, get your money, and get out. Hope I could help.
Oct. 20th, 2009: New guitar AND front row for Mars Volta.

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I met Sonic Youth on June 30th, and Mars Volta on Oct 20th.
#7
Put a few songs on line and do free downloads. CDs are going out to style quickly.
When you do get shows, put a few songs on CDs and give them away with stickers and such or sell them for $2; cheap enough to make people just buy them and feel exclusive
#8
dude I've got the same problem, what I recomend is playing any gig you can get, show the EP to anyone and everyone that could give you a gig, then just take a copy around with you whenever you can sell it, sell them at gigs, sell them to your friends, just do whatever you can, and remember your only selling actually CD's if your Susan Boyle. (ROlling Stone MAgazine Joke) so make sure you market your EP and a few singles on TUNECORE so you can sell the music digitally, because thats the only way music is being sold right now

Then start a website with links to where your selling your music, where your playing, and at gigs just say hey if you like us go buy some CD's and look for our website, or myspace whichever you have. THen eventually you'll start selling music
Last edited by Triple-D at Jul 23, 2010,
#9
At your age, your best bet would be school events, and if your parents are cool with it, playing house parties. Festivals are a good bet too.

Basically, your only traditional outlet that ISN't really an option is bars.

I've always maintained that you should try to sell your music. If you attach no value to it, why should anyone else? However, take the time to get your stuff recorded properly. Nobody wants to buy a half-baked product.

Use the fact that you have a much wider social circle than most adults and engage social media. Justin Bieber (never mind that you probably hate him....) started off as a YouTube star, and when the labels saw him getting a ridiculous number of hits, they couldn't help but to be interested.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Playing house parties is actually a very good idea for young bands starting out.

Firstly, I assume that you've got a load of friends that also listen to your genre who would be there. This means the crowd is already on your side and, at least a decent sized crowd. Plus, you get people from other areas who will turn up through affiliation (knowing your friends and up for a piss-up) who will hear you. So, if you're good and everyone enjoys it, you've just made a name for yourself across a widespread area.

Plus, drunk people are more willing to spend £2 on buying an EP
#12
^ Keep in mind, though, that Trent included himself in the "nobody knows the answers these days." I agree with most of what he said, though, but especially that.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Even if you can't go gigging now, just practice and write. A local band at my high school formed when they were in 6th grade, so around 11 years old, and stayed together through 12th grade. They won the high schools battle of the bands their sophomore, junior, and senior year, and were the established band in the area, even if people didn't like their style (hard rock) they recognized that they were ridiculously tight and performed flawlessly...mainly because they had been practicing together for 6 years