#1
so the stock strings on my acoustic guitar are either wearing off or is rusty. i've only had the guitar for about 2 weeks now. the parts of the strings where i fret the most on the fretboard are becoming a different color than the rest of the parts of the string. they're also beginning to sound very dull and not as full as when i first got them two weeks ago. is this normal for new strings on a new guitar to lose their brightness so quickly, keeping in mind they're stock strings? would this be a time for a string change?

this would be my first time changing strings, and i need some help choosing a string gauge. i've heard that changing string gauges is not recommended because it could damage your guitar because of all the released or increased tension, depending on whether you increase or decrease your string gauge. is this true? if so, i have a washburn d6s and i'd like to keep the string gauge the same, but i don't know if the stock stings of this guitar is light, medium, or heavy.

any opinions on whether it's time for a string change and if i should go light, medium, or heavy?
#3
Use whatever gauge you're most comfortable with. The lower the gauge, the easier it is to play, the higher the gauge, the better the tone. And the neck tension thing only becomes an issue if you do a dramatic change, like from 9s to 12s or something, and even then it might not be a problem.
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#4
thanks for the input.
but here's a random question: if you get fret buzz on one set of strings, would changing strings fix it?
#5
Quote by obeythepenguin
Unlikely. Fret buzz is usually caused by having your action too low; string gauge has nothing to do with it. To raise your action you'll probably need to get a new bridge saddle.


Adjusting truss rod helped mine.
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#6
Quote by obeythepenguin
Unlikely. Fret buzz is usually caused by having your action too low; string gauge has nothing to do with it. To raise your action you'll probably need to get a new bridge saddle.

oh, okay, i'm not really getting fret buzz anyway. i think it buzzes sometimes because i'm not pressing hard enough on the frets. but back on topic, i think i'm going to try out medium strings first. but what strings would you guys recommend? i've heard of d'addario's and ernie balls. i'm trying to go for a sound similar to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quUWedTZQNI
#7
Quote by obeythepenguin
If there's a neck relief problem, a truss rod adjustment may be necessary, but it's not intended for adjusting action. I try to avoid messing with the truss rod whenever possible, since it's usually not needed, and it's too easy to do irreparable damage.


True. Just have to be VERY careful
"He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast."

~Leonardo da Vinci
#8
Quote by oommggwwttff
oh, okay, i'm not really getting fret buzz anyway. i think it buzzes sometimes because i'm not pressing hard enough on the frets. but back on topic, i think i'm going to try out medium strings first. but what strings would you guys recommend? i've heard of d'addario's and ernie balls. i'm trying to go for a sound similar to this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=quUWedTZQNI

Actualy, try light strings first. I think D'addario EJ16s are somewhat of a basic standard. For some reason acoustic lights are more of a "medium" string as most people buy between extra light and medium gauges (0.010 - 0.013).
#9
Quote by obeythepenguin
It's not that acoustic strings are heavier, so much as electric strings are lighter. Whichever way you look at it, heavier strings move more air, producing more volume. That's kind of an important consideration when you don't have magnetic pickups or other electronic amplification.

I think most acoustic players prefer light to medium. I don't like anything lighter than .011's, myself, on any of my guitars. When I bend strings, I want it to be deliberate.


This. On my acoustic, I know I couldn't do anything under 11s, and 12 is really optimal for me. Of course, I may just have rather sloppy left hand technique, seeing as when I play electric I use 10s and I inadvertently bend notes a lot. But really, 10s on an acoustic just sounds weirdly empty to me.
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