#1
I've been gropwing in interest for funk lately and been listening to a lot of Larry Graham, Stanley Clarke etc...
Does anyone know of any other good funk artists and tips on composing my own funk basslines, use of octaves, arpeggios etc
#2
someone will be able to help with note choices etc., but I'll say this: the rhythm is just as if not more more important than the note choice for funk.
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#3
Look up
Tower of power
earth wind and fire
Parliment funkadelic.
Graham central Station
Jamiroquai(maybe not funk but amazing groove)

And plus one to what gilly said.
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#4
Rocco Prestia (Tower of Power) has a great video. It was on Youtube at some point, check it out.

To add to Sam's list

The Meters
The Bamboos
James Brown (in all incarnations)
The Reddings
Chic (Bernie Edwards is another great funk bassist)
Average White Band
Ohio Players (everyone needs to know how to play "Fire" and "Love Rollercoaster"
To a certain extent, some of War's songs are quite funky.
and of course, Sly and the Family Stone!
#5
I think you should alos look at bands that also groove very well, cause its very closely related.

Old R&B bands for instance.

James jamersons playing. Jackson 5, stevie ownder and jamiroquai spring to mind,
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Fender MIA jazz bass
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#6
Quote by gilly_90
someone will be able to help with note choices etc., but I'll say this: the rhythm is just as if not more more important than the note choice for funk.


Yes. This has been one of my biggest lessons playing funk/soul-jazz in the last four months. Never forget that you are in the rhythm section, keeping time and living inside of the pocket. Listen to the drums like your depends on it because, in funk, it does. Which is why I think that listening to other genres than funk which focus heavily on rhythmic intricacy, such as afrobeat, jazz, soul-jazz, electronica, hip-hop, etc., is important for developing a solid sense of what it is to groove so hard that faces melt.

But be sure to have fun!

And listen to:

Soulive
The Budos Band
The Brothers Johnson
Medeski, Martin and Wood
Lettuce
Pino Palladino: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m4XI6LXCsH8 (then go ahead and listen to D'Angelo)
RH Factor
Big Sam's Funky Nation
Dr. Lonnie Smith
Crash & Dr. Lonnie Smith

Additionally, archive.org is an amazing resource for music. You can download entire live sets by these groups, really learn something from a band performing:

Shokazoba
Fantastic 4
Pocket

and be sure to download "Stanton Moore Live at Lincoln Theater on 2006-03-25" from archive.org - Stanton Moore, Will Bernard and Dr. Lonnie Smith. I shouldn't have to say anything else.
#7
James Jamerson once told Suzy Quattro, "But it's not what you play, it's what you don't play".
Important advice for all bass players, but especially for R & B and funk players.
#9
Soulive is one of the best new age funk bands around...and the crazy thing is, is that they don't even have a bass player.

Neal Evans does all that ish on the Keyboard WHILE HE'S PLAYING A MELODY.

That dude is a beast.

dave.