#1
Hi guys. I just got a quick question for you all.
Whenever I play live or at practice, I jump around everywhere and have as much fun as I can. Because of this, though, I don't play things as well as I do when I'm not running around and shit. Would you say energy or quality is more key in live performances? I mean, I love running around and everything, but I don't want it to effect my quality too extremely. But it seems like live, tone doesn't even matter THAT much, and you don't have to perform everything PERFECTLY, just cause mixing and the crowd and all that stuff all together makes it so it doesn't even matter that much. Thoughts/help?
Sending a dummy to my God.

Sending a dummy to my God.


Sending a dummy to my God.


Sending a dummy to my God.
#2
id rather watch people sitting still and playing a good song than running around and screwing it up. some of my favorite guitarists just chill in one spot and headbang a little.

my thoughts? - go learn your guitar part, get your guitar a little closer to you and stop screwing up the songs if that means no running around then stop running around.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jul 24, 2010,
#3
instead of playing while your jumping around, jump around while your playing.

focus more on playing than on running around, instead of trying to force yourself to headbang as much as possible get into the music as much as you can and the jumping around should come naturally
#4
There is a balance to it but a show with energy will get you a lot more fans than one without.
the only people that appreciate perfect musicianship are musicians, nobody else gives a toss once they're up dancing, jumping and singing
#5
performance is a big deal for me. you gotta have fun to get ME to get into it. but i agree, dont let it affect your playing to the point that you play like garbage
#6
Frankly, most of the people watching your live performances aren't going to care about your puny little guitar part. That's not meant as an insult to you, it's just a fact that the majority of people don't care that much about every single note or absolute perfection. Most people aren't going to notice some sloppy chord changes or a slightly flubbed riff.

That's not to say you can get away with just playing badly, as you do need to play the song at a good, listenable, enjoyable level; however, at a live show, that level is not absolute perfection, and most people are going to have a lot more fun watching you jump around than watching you play just a little bit better.

However, I think the best answer is that you should learn to play at your absolute best while jumping around and having fun. No, it's not easy, but if it was, wouldn't everyone do it?
#7
I have no problem with a guitarist stopping to focus on difficult parts, but by all means, if you can jump around and still get the idea across, ****in do it!
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#8
Quote by libriumbum
There is a balance to it but a show with energy will get you a lot more fans than one without.
the only people that appreciate perfect musicianship are musicians, nobody else gives a toss once they're up dancing, jumping and singing

everyone cares if it sounds like hammered dog as$ because you keep hitting the wrong notes. seriously, next gig you get, just play a whole bunch of wrong notes and jump around. people will be lining up to leave.

be your own worst critic, if you notice yourself jumping around and missing notes then stop till you get back on track. im not saying dont run around, im saying make sure you can do both off stage before you do both on stage.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jul 24, 2010,
#9
Read your audience. Just by looking you should be able to tell whether they like technicality or energy. My first show? I went for technicality. I wanted to play everything perfect. Do I regret this? Not at all. I had a blast.

My second show was a bit different. We started and there was about ten people in the room. About a minute into the first song, we had the room filled and people were moshing/dancing/whatever they wanted to do during the song. We even got the tech guy (whom we didn't ask) to do strobe lighting effects and stuff. I just... had fun. I jumped around, headbanged... anything I could do to interact with the audience a little more. Granted, I had my parts down PAT. I didn't forget the songs until about a year or two later, and I could play them with my eyes closed while having a conversation... but I digress.

Fact of the matter is learn your songs to where you could play them if you were having sex (ohbaby). Know them THAT well. Then it doesn't matter what you do, you'll play perfectly (or at least close to) anyways.

Quick side-note: I actually dropped my pick during my second show cause I was getting so into it and had to play most of the rest of the song with my fingers It was interesting.
#10
If I wanted to hear it played perfectly, I'd listen to the album. If you can play it well enough live, then you running around and having fun is a lot more entertaining to me.
Ohai.

Actually from Canada.
#11
it depends. do you have a way to record? if you do, record quality songs, and then live go nuts. if you dont, how badly do the song's sound when you're going crazy? just remember that if you cant record, those shows are all that anyone will hear, and they won't be able to hear your songs the way they were originally intended to sound because you won't be playing them right.
then again, screw the audience, if you're enjoying it, you're doing something right, if not, you're doing something wrong.
#12
Even if there's room for error, you still want to strive for a high level musically.

I mean, I'd rather be the one playing the nasty stuff versus the one jumping around aimlessly. That way if any of your friends take a cellphone video out of it, they'll see how much of a dirty mother****er you are every single time they play it . Plus you'll feel better if you listen to the performance because you wont feel too bad about your playing.

It's essential to put on a good show, but how many favorite musicians do you have that you could say "I hate his playing but man I sure love how he jumps around"?
Last edited by Pillo114 at Jul 25, 2010,
#13
The average joe and 14 year old girl at your shows doesn't really care as long as you are noticeably messing up.They are there to see a good shows and be entertained. So I'd worry more about energy.
The other musicians in the crowd and obv the other bands you play with are going to nit pick all your errors .
What you want is a solid mix of both. That's nothing but practice , practice , practice , practice , practice , practice. Practice till you are so comfortable with your songs that you don't even have to pay attention to play them
#14
You're asking the wrong person.... I'm 63 and don't jump around a lot. I'm doing good to stand up through a set.
Seriously, it depends on what you're doing, and what your audience expects. If went to see Chet Atkins and he started posturing and jerking his head around..... I'd be....Surprised.

However, as above....The average 14-year-old going to a punk or metal show wants some action.
#15
Depends on the genre.

If you are playing mainstream rock/pop punk or some forms of metal music, stage presence is more important than playing perfectly.

If you are playing forms of music that focus more on the music and virtuosity like jazz and classical I think its better to focus on the notes than jumping about.

Some forms of music require both; music like instrumental rock (Satriani/Vai) require both stage presence and a high level of musicianship.

That being said, jumping around isn't the only way to get a good stage presence
#16
everyone misses a note here or there, its no big deal while an energetic performance is (not always the same as jumping around). However, messing up ALL THE TIME is annoying.
#17
Quote by protest000
Hi guys. I just got a quick question for you all.
Whenever I play live or at practice, I jump around everywhere and have as much fun as I can. Because of this, though, I don't play things as well as I do when I'm not running around and shit. Would you say energy or quality is more key in live performances? I mean, I love running around and everything, but I don't want it to effect my quality too extremely. But it seems like live, tone doesn't even matter THAT much, and you don't have to perform everything PERFECTLY, just cause mixing and the crowd and all that stuff all together makes it so it doesn't even matter that much. Thoughts/help?


It matters to people that listen.

Its true though that in some crowds, the look/vibe/visual presentation is the main draw with the music being secondary.

So I guess it depends on what you want to do & who you're playing for.
shred is gaudy music
#18
Are you screwing up the song? Is it noticeable to anyone without a musically trained ear, or anyone who doesn't know your songs? If no, keep on doing it. Of course, I'm not saying to be content with sloppy playing that will get the job done, but energy is a bigger part of most live shows than actual playing. Just practice more on your own while jumping around. Being able to play your instrument, and being able to play your instrument while flying around on-stage are 2 different things. If you can play your part standing still, no matter how many times you practice it sitting, it won't help you nail a riff as you jump off the bass drum. Practice 'playing' your songs perfectly, then practice 'performing' them well enough to sound great, while looking amazing. I know some music purists on here will disagree, but shows are about showmanship.

For example, I was watching a show 2 nights ago where the bassist's 2x15 cab completely died, but he kept on playing his parts, only slightly audible during solo bass parts (he had an ampeg 2x15, and a hartke 4x10). They played 2 last songs, ending their set early, no one in the crowd could hear the difference.

I also saw Dillinger Escape Plan at Warped yesterday. During the final song, the lead guitar dove off stage into the pit and kept playing, soloing in the center of a circle pit. He had to drop the guitar to get back up, and missed a big part of the outro while sound tech got him a second one, but who cares. Will I be taking a much bigger interest in their music now? Of course I will.
#19
Quote by morrock
For example, I was watching a show 2 nights ago where the bassist's 2x15 cab completely died, but he kept on playing his parts, only slightly audible during solo bass parts (he had an ampeg 2x15, and a hartke 4x10). They played 2 last songs, ending their set early, no one in the crowd could hear the difference.

Really? No one noticed? Live bass plays a MUCH bigger role than on the album. Bass is the only part you can really "feel". I woulda been disappointed if the bassist didn't fix his shit when it started messing up.
#20
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Really? No one noticed? Live bass plays a MUCH bigger role than on the album. Bass is the only part you can really "feel". I woulda been disappointed if the bassist didn't fix his shit when it started messing up.


Not that the band didn't notice, it was the crowd, and the bassist did his best to fix it while they we playing, but he couldn't tell what was wrong with it at the minute, and it wasn't as simple as something getting unplugged. I noticed, my band's singer noticed, maybe 1 or 2 other people, and that was it. It's just that most normal people's ears aren't tailored to hear many differences/problems in music, but they do notice when the band, and themselves, are having a good time.