#1
Ok so I have been working on a song for guitar all day I have an intro a chorus a verse a bridge and an outro. All the sound sounds great. Not only that it sounds great together. There is just one problem I have no way to transistion from one part to the next which renders the good song shitty. What is a good way of transistioning? Thx
#2
Isn't this a segway:




Anyways, try guitar and drum fills, maybe a crescendo, or even a note pedal sometimes works.
#3
Are all your parts in the same key? If not, do you modulate elegantly between them?

Also, I think you mean segue.
Quote by brownsfan456
Anything is possible with music which is sooo awesome


Quote by metal4all

I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#4
Yes I Sid mean segue sorry for the spelling error only if I could change the thread name now. And the whole song is in the same key however I was thinking about changing keys to give the song some depth and more feeling. A drum fill is a good idea I haven't gotten together with my band yet so I was being narrow minded to guitar only. What are some other options so a drum fill doesn't seem to forced everytime?
#5
Quote by lil PopTart kid
Yes I Sid mean segue sorry for the spelling error only if I could change the thread name now. And the whole song is in the same key however I was thinking about changing keys to give the song some depth and more feeling. A drum fill is a good idea I haven't gotten together with my band yet so I was being narrow minded to guitar only. What are some other options so a drum fill doesn't seem to forced everytime?


Just strum the chords and chords alone in a way that makes them flow into each other. Listen to some of the music you're trying to emulate and see how they do it. Good structure is a bit of acquired taste, but it's one of the many things that can make an okay song great.

So you shouldn't need a drum fill to transition between sections. Your song should be able to hold together all on its own from a harmonic/melodic basis.
Quote by brownsfan456
Anything is possible with music which is sooo awesome


Quote by metal4all

I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#6
Expand on the melody leading up to the next section and merge it with the melody it's going into, or do something that contrasts the sections completely. It's all personal taste.

Something that I do often do is leave a few blank bars where the transition is going and play the song. Then when the transition comes, I just hum/sing something that I want to hear, not thinking about what I'll do when the section comes, just letting it happen naturally.
#7
Thanks for all the great ideas guys they worked and I got my song finished to my satisfaction. But if you have any more ideas keep them coming I'm sure this couldnhelp me or other people on any songs and even improve this one.
Last edited by lil PopTart kid at Jul 27, 2010,
#8
Quote by lil PopTart kid
Ok so I have been working on a song for guitar all day I have an intro a chorus a verse a bridge and an outro. All the sound sounds great. Not only that it sounds great together. There is just one problem I have no way to transistion from one part to the next which renders the good song shitty. What is a good way of transistioning? Thx


Study cadences and learn how parts can resolve, or ways that parts of the song can move. Also use upper voice leading even if some of the notes aren't necessarily diatonic to the progression you are working with.

Best,

Sean
#9
Sometimes if nothing seems to be working, silence could be your best bet. Let the last part fade out and then bring in the next part. Music doesn't have to stay busy all the time and sometimes a moment of silence fits just right.
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#10
^ I ended up changing the song and using this just before the chorus.
It made it feel 10x more epic when the chorus did hit.