#1
Well I've graduate from the complete idiots guide to music theory. I want to learn more about chord prgresson. Better ways o right veers and choruses. I like reg chords. Sevenths. Nineths. Etc. Mostly for acoustics. This is for rock. Slow songs. Depressing songs. Jazzy tunes. Etc
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#2
Quote by silly6-string
Well I've graduate from the complete idiots guide to music theory. I want to learn more about chord prgresson. Better ways o right veers and choruses. I like reg chords. Sevenths. Nineths. Etc. Mostly for acoustics. This is for rock. Slow songs. Depressing songs. Jazzy tunes. Etc

This isn't really a theory book, more of a songwriting book. I think it has alot of info on what your looking for though.
http://www.amazon.com/How-Write-Songs-Guitar-Guitar-Playing/dp/0879306114
It has examples of progressions and chords being used in specific songs and how their most commonly used. And just a ton of information overall.
#3
Jazzology, it's great.

You do have to be able to read the treble clef beforehand tho, but other than that it starts with the basics like intervals and moves on to more advanced stuff.
Fender Jaguar
Morley PVO +
TC Polytune
Fulltone Ultimate Octave
Boss DS2
Blackstar HT-40
Digitech Timebender
TC Trinity

(offboard; Whammy IV, Crybaby 535Q, Digitech RP100A)
#5
In college we used Paul Harder's Harmonic Materials in Tonal Music. It's the best course for learning the core of harmony/theory in western music I've ever seen:

http://www.amazon.com/Harmonic-Materials-Tonal-Music-Programmed/dp/0205629717/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_b

I think Paul Harder has passed on, but this looks to be the latest version of the books that we used in the 90's.

It won't teach you jazz theory or modes the way guitarists use them today, but it will give you a solid foundation that you can use to learn pretty much anything you want. This is a college-level theory course, so it is not to be taken lightly. If you're willing to put in the time and go through the exercises, you will not be disappointed.
#6
Fretboard Mastery by Troy Stetina is nice, although it does focus a LOT on ear training, which is good, but can be a bit too difficult if you are just starting out... can you tell me difference between a major 6th and minor 6th? I sure as hell couldn't when starting out....
Yeah