#1
something that can handle screams and falsetto. ive never used a microphone before, i do not know anything about this subject. i figured i can plug it in to my bass amp, would there be a problem with that? thanks for any help.
#2
I reccomend the SM58 by Shure if you are planning on both clean vocals and screaming as it is a good quality mic whilst not beeing too expensive.

As for a mic stand usualy vocals are just straight stands, though a boom type stand will do fine and is more versatile for other uses.

Pluging the mic into your bass amp shouldn't be too bad, although there is a difference in the input ohms between bass and mics but i've done it. The sound should be ok too but obviously beeing optimised for a bass it won't sound quite as good as a proper PA.
#3
Quote by brokenwizard
I reccomend the SM58 by Shure if you are planning on both clean vocals and screaming as it is a good quality mic whilst not beeing too expensive.

As for a mic stand usualy vocals are just straight stands, though a boom type stand will do fine and is more versatile for other uses.

Pluging the mic into your bass amp shouldn't be too bad, although there is a difference in the input ohms between bass and mics but i've done it. The sound should be ok too but obviously beeing optimised for a bass it won't sound quite as good as a proper PA.

is there any difference since im playing bass at the same time? like should i get a specific stand thats easy to use while playing an instrument, and would anything be screwed up plugging both a bas and mic in the same amp?
#4
i wouldn't recomend pluging both into the same amp. You probably wouldn't damage it, but it would sound pretty terrible, one would probably muffle the other.

As for a stand I guess a boom stand would be better if you are playing your bass at the same time, it's less likely to get in the way of your instrument.
#5
Quote by brokenwizard
i wouldn't recomend pluging both into the same amp. You probably wouldn't damage it, but it would sound pretty terrible, one would probably muffle the other.

As for a stand I guess a boom stand would be better if you are playing your bass at the same time, it's less likely to get in the way of your instrument.

oh so i guess i should get some kind of PA thing. or i can see if my guitarist has an extra amp.
#6
Going through a bass amp is a terrible idea and going through a guitar amp will be even worse. bass amps have a generally flat response but usually taper off at high frequencies which you will need to pitch and nuance your voice. Guitar amps are not flat and are designed to deliberately colour and distort the sound going through them. Neither will have a balanced input which you need to plug in a decent quality mic.

Either way you will sound bad and this will become discouraging.

Having the sound coming from a different direction will help you to pick out your voice more clearly.

You need a wedge monitor with a built in amp or a small PA. look for one with a balanced mic input (with a three pin XLR socket not just a jack)

The shure SM58 is an excellent mic but there are others just as good at the price, look at the AKG D5 and the Sennheiser 835, Electrovoice, Rode also make good mic's. You wouldn't buy a bass without trying it so try the mic's out. Different mic's suit different voices. Most cheap mic's are poor with a lot of feedback problems and handling noise and a poor response but I've tried the Samson Q6 and the Behringer 8500 and they are not too far short of the Shure if you are really short of cash.
#7
Quote by Phil Starr
Going through a bass amp is a terrible idea and going through a guitar amp will be even worse. bass amps have a generally flat response but usually taper off at high frequencies which you will need to pitch and nuance your voice. Guitar amps are not flat and are designed to deliberately colour and distort the sound going through them. Neither will have a balanced input which you need to plug in a decent quality mic.

Either way you will sound bad and this will become discouraging.

Having the sound coming from a different direction will help you to pick out your voice more clearly.

You need a wedge monitor with a built in amp or a small PA. look for one with a balanced mic input (with a three pin XLR socket not just a jack)

The shure SM58 is an excellent mic but there are others just as good at the price, look at the AKG D5 and the Sennheiser 835, Electrovoice, Rode also make good mic's. You wouldn't buy a bass without trying it so try the mic's out. Different mic's suit different voices. Most cheap mic's are poor with a lot of feedback problems and handling noise and a poor response but I've tried the Samson Q6 and the Behringer 8500 and they are not too far short of the Shure if you are really short of cash.

Alright, cool, thanks for all the help and for being so specific!
#8
Quote by brokenwizard

As for a mic stand usualy vocals are just straight stands, though a boom type stand will do fine and is more versatile for other uses.


Whilst the traditional straight stand is swell for pulling mad poses and stuff, if you're playing an instrument I much prefer ones with arms. This is because there is space for my guitar.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
Quote by AlanHB
Whilst the traditional straight stand is swell for pulling mad poses and stuff, if you're playing an instrument I much prefer ones with arms. This is because there is space for my guitar.

This. And for mics, you can't go wrong with the SM58.
#10
I'd suggest a Beta 58 and these stands (getting two is a good idea i case one breaks).

Edit: I've also seen the Sennheiser e835 recommended a good bit on here.
Last edited by Alex Vik at Aug 1, 2010,
#11
I tried the SM58 but the AKG D5 was better suited for my voice, look it up.
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