#1
Whats the tuning for Vietnamese music ?? I just got myself a scalopped, and Vietnamese music is the most appropriated for that type of guitar.
So yeah, anyone the Vietnamese guitar tuning ?
#2
step 1. find vietnamese guitar tab
srep 2. check the tab to see the tuning
Quote by Rogue Hermit


You're a good man. I was waiting for somebody to step up with the obligatory "I come blood" reference.

Quote by guylee
goddammit. I'm going to bed. You win good sir.

Quote by stratguy335
Haha! You got the joke! You win a cookie.
#4
Quote by MofoZofo
Whats the tuning for Vietnamese music ?? I just got myself a scalopped, and Vietnamese music is the most appropriated for that type of guitar.
So yeah, anyone the Vietnamese guitar tuning ?

I've never read such bollocks in my life.

I sure do hear Steve Vai and Yngwie Malmsteem playing a lot of vietnamese music...
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Quote by steven seagull
I've never read such bollocks in my life.

I sure do hear Steve Vai and Yngwie Malmsteem playing a lot of vietnamese music...



Well you are quite an idiot... Vietnamese are innovators of scalopped frets.. Get your facts straight before posting some thing... Idiot.... FYI Vai on has 21 to 24th frets scalopped... Retard..
#6
Quote by MofoZofo
Well you are quite an idiot... Vietnamese are innovators of scalopped frets.. Get your facts straight before posting some thing... Idiot.... FYI Vai on has 21 to 24th frets scalopped... Retard..

I thought these were more suited to Vietnamese music... but what do I know, I just have a girlfriend whose mom knows how to play these.

But really... the tuning won't do anything for you. It's about how you pluck, the tone, what notes you use, liberal use of glissando-like (NOTE: Not glissando) techniques/slide-like techniques.

If you REALLY want the tunings that bad though... here is a .PDF of all the different instruments and their tunings. You can have at it.

Quote by Website about Scalloped Guitar
The first school is made up of players who have had their fretboards scalloped in order to play Indian music. This school uses the South Indian vina method of bending notes: the strings are pulled across the frets in order to raise the pitch. Jazz guitarist John McLaughlin did some great work on the scalloped fretboard guitar (built by Abe Wechter) for a brief but very rich period of his career while he was playing with the group Shakti, which included South Indian violinist L. Shankar, North Indian tabla master Zakir Hussain, and South Indian percussion master T.H. (Vikku) Vinayakram. Matthew Montfort, guitarist and leader of the world fusion music group Ancient Future, has devoted himself to the scalloped fretboard guitar since 1978. Montfort spent months in intensive study with vina master K.S. Subramanian in order to fully apply the South Indian gamaka (note-bending) techniques to the guitar. Montfort's transcription of South Indian vina music is available for those who wish to study these note-bending techniques.

The second school has its origins in Vietnam. The fretboard of a guitar is very heavily scalloped, and the strings are kept quite loose. Often only five of the strings are used. They are pushed in between the frets towards the fretboard in order to raise the pitch. This facilitates using a guitar to play Vietnamese music, but does not allow standard chords to be played.

The third school is made up of players who feel that a scalloped fretboard provides a sweeter sound and reduced friction which allows for greater speed and better vibrato. Yngwie Malmsteen is an example of a player from this school. Fender has even released a special scalloped fretboard version of the Stratocaster in his honor.


Source

The second paragraph... I wouldn't wanna be limited to only melody, personally. I'm pretty sure it doesn't matter what tuning you use, but it's how you raise the pitch that matters MUCH more (pressing (Vietnam) as opposed to bending (India)).
#7
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I thought these were more suited to Vietnamese music... but what do I know, I just have a girlfriend whose mom knows how to play these.

But really... the tuning won't do anything for you. It's about how you pluck, the tone, what notes you use, liberal use of glissando-like (NOTE: Not glissando) techniques/slide-like techniques.

If you REALLY want the tunings that bad though... here is a .PDF of all the different instruments and their tunings. You can have at it.


Source

The second paragraph... I wouldn't wanna be limited to only melody, personally. I'm pretty sure it doesn't matter what tuning you use, but it's how you raise the pitch that matters MUCH more (pressing (Vietnam) as opposed to bending (India)).



At least you're not some idiot troll who thinks that he knows about everything... Thanks for the tip dude.. But yes there are appropriate tuning for Vietnamese music... I know a vietnamese pro player... Forgot the tuning he told me.. Maybe someone could help but apparently some ingnant people who come and troll... Idiots.. Thanks anyways yo.
#8
MofoZofo, here's a tip: If you're that rude and aggressive towards someone who makes a perfectly valid point, you're probably going to find yourself reported more than once.

As to your question, most eastern music is difficult or impossible to play with instruments built for western music. If the music you're trying to emulate uses a scale that is not 12 tones, it will make it much more difficult (if not near impossible). That is, unless you have some different kind of scalloped guitar than you said; you didn't really give a lot of information.
#9
Quote by MofoZofo
At least you're not some idiot troll who thinks that he knows about everything... Thanks for the tip dude.. But yes there are appropriate tuning for Vietnamese music... I know a vietnamese pro player... Forgot the tuning he told me.. Maybe someone could help but apparently some ingnant people who come and troll... Idiots.. Thanks anyways yo.


Woah dude, calm down. He's actually pretty well-known on UG and he's not an idiot by any means. He knows his stuff. I think you just misinterpreted what he was saying.

Anyways, here:

In Vietnam: The guitar in Vietnam is sometimes called "Ghita", this scalloped guitar has an interesting origin. It is believed that the guitar is has its origins with in the Vietnamese American community in mainland America. During the early 1930s the Vietnamese American's at the time were looking for something to which they could be play and adapt to their own traditional music. So they had scalloped the frets and tuned the Vietnamese guitar in a low "Open C" tuning [c-f-c'-g'-c"].

Source:

http://www.museumofworldmusic.com/gui.html

Last section on the page. These "Ghita" were only 5-stringed instruments.
Fender American Vintage '62 Stratocaster
Gibson Les Paul Custom
TC Electronic Polytune
Danelectro Blue Paisley
EHX Big Muff Pi w/ Tone Wicker
Dunlop Crybaby
EHX Deluxe Memory Boy
Egnater Tweaker

Quote by Jackal58
Yer pretty fly for a Canadian.
#10
I do a lot of Japanese music, seeing as I'm Japanese and somehow I don't think the musical lineages are that far removed. Just use a open tuning or do like I do and learn the scales in standard. Tunings only obliquely affect the sound of music, and I think you're putting by far too much credence into tuning. Also you are sort of a dick.

I do a bit of open G as well as open D, if only to allow the ringing of open strings when I'm emulating koto style, or to allow me the sliding power chords of the shamisen. Your best bet is really to ****ing study Vietnamese music and then, hey, trying to play it. Thats the way it is with any musical tradition. That's what I did and your music will sound fake and forced if you don't do so as well.
Quote by brownsfan456
Anything is possible with music which is sooo awesome


Quote by metal4all

I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.
#11
Quote by MofoZofo
At least you're not some idiot troll who thinks that he knows about everything... Thanks for the tip dude.. But yes there are appropriate tuning for Vietnamese music... I know a vietnamese pro player... Forgot the tuning he told me.. Maybe someone could help but apparently some ingnant people who come and troll... Idiots.. Thanks anyways yo.

gtfo mah bridge.

You made a daft statement - a scallopped guitar is nothing other than a choice you make because of how they play, although even then it's somewhat debatable seeing as your strings pretty much never touch the fretboard anyway. What it does do is remove the likelihood of your fingers touching the fretboard, that means less friction so bending and vibrato can be smoother - it doesn't affect what you play, only how you play.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#12
calling someone an idiot counts as flaming...

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
Quote by axemanchris
calling someone an idiot counts as flaming...

CT

Especially twice, followed by retard.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.