#1
I posted a lesson on Neapolitan chords yesterday, and it got approved, but there were two mistakes in it.

1) I listed some prerequisites, and in the second i prerequisite, I said:

If I ask you where E is on the D string, you should be able to figure out that E is on the 2nd and 12th frets of the D string.


I meant to say that E is on the 2nd and 14th frets, not 2nd and 12th


2) Under the Examples: heading, the first example that I put is tabbed right, but underneath it I said:

Which is Am, Dm, Dm again, Am, E, and then Am again.


I mean to say "which is Am, Dm, Dm again, E, and then Am again."


I'm pretty sure that I can't change this myself, so If an admin could possibly help me out here I'd be really grateful so that my lesson doesn't get docked on ratings because I made two typing mistakes...

Thanks!
#2
Please link the specific article here for Genie's reference, as well as giving a little larger chunk of the section that you'd like changing for ease of finding in the HTML coding.
#3
Quote by Colohue
Please link the specific article here for Genie's reference, as well as giving a little larger chunk of the section that you'd like changing for ease of finding in the HTML coding.


sorry, I meant to link to it lol
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/chords/neapolitan_chords.html


Here are the larger sections, and I'll bold the part that needs fixing

Before I start saying anything else about Neapolitan chords, I'm going to list some prerequisites for this lesson:

1) You should know some basic music theory. Know how to construct basic chords (major and minor) and your scales, scale degrees, and what chords are normally built off them. Essentially, if I were to ask you to play the basic chord built on the fifth degree of the C major scale, you would be able to figure out that I asked you to play G, and if I asked you to play a major chord that was built on the fifth degree of A minor, you would be able to figure out that I asked you to play E.

2) You should know the notes on the guitar fretboard, or at least be able to figure out what notes are where without an obnoxious amount of delay. If I ask you where E is on the D string, you should be able to figure out that E is on the 2nd and 12th frets of the D string.

3) You should be able to play some barre chords, not just open chords.


i meant to say "14th"


Examples:

Lets say you have a i-iv-V progression in a minor key, which is fairly common and basic. I use major chord for the chord built on the fifth degree of the minor scale because it pulls to the ending root chord more than if I used the regular minor chord, and I'm sure there's some lesson here on UG that explains that concept.

We'll use A minor again and put an A minor chord again at the end to give this example some finality (remember that uppercase roman numerals mean major, and lowercase mean minor):

e-----0----1----1----0----0---
B-----1----3----3----0----1---
G-----2----2----2----1----2---
D-----2----0----0----2----2---
A-----0--------------2--------
E--------------------0--------


Which is Am, Dm, Dm again, Am, E, and then Am again. I doubled the IV chord because, in my opinion, it sounds better this way.


That "Am" in the description of the progression isn't actually in the progression, and makes it somewhat confusing to understand, so it needs to be deleted (in the description)
Last edited by duck1992 at Jul 27, 2010,