#1
hey guys, OK basically I'm self taught, 14 years old, and was told to learn the major scale as all i do is use the pentatonic (because I'm a solo n00b ) by someone on here, so i looked it up and got the "5" scale positions, now here is a link where i got it from

scroll down to the bottom of the page so you see the pictures

http://www.justinguitar.com/en/SC-001-TheMajorScale.php

now i need to ask a few questions, (like super stupid ones coz im an idiot)

is this one big scale? or 5 little ones?

and if a song is played in the key of G major, could i play all the (little) scales as one big one and play any note in that scale for it to sound good?

or if any song in a major key, would it sound good? or not?

because when i see people shred up and down the neck, as i only know the pentatonic, i cant help to think there using this one "big" scale,

sorry if these questions are really stupid, being self tought i just want an understanding off this scale so i can use it in the right circumstances
#2
If you're only using the penatonic, and want to shred up and down the neck. Learn the extended penatonic scale, and then from there, the different modes of penatonic. You can play the penatonic scale about 5-6 different ways, in about 10-11 different places on the neck if you know what you're doing? And it will all be in the same key.

I suggest a Guitar tutor mate, It helped me loads to learn from somone who knows versus the internet
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
It is one big scale, it's just been split up into 5 little patterns that make it easier to get your brain and fingers around.

If you had any song in a major key as long as you move the root of the scale to the key of the song it would work.

The pentatonic also exists all over the neck, the key thing to understand about scales is that they're not "shapes" or "patterns"; they're a set of intervals and notes that occur all over the fretboard.

Say you're working in A minor and you're using the pentatonic to solo with you can use just the "shape" of A minor pentatonic that everyone knows or you can realise that it contains the notes A, C, D, E and G and find those anywhere on the neck. Once you get your head around that then soloing all over the neck becomes much easier.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
You should visualize the fretboard as one large playing surface. If a scale works in one position, it will work in any other position that incorporates the same notes. Whatever sounds good to you is important, but being able to recognize what scales and chords are being played is VERY important to any musician.

There are certain scales that will work over certain chords; sometimes more than 1 scale is appropriate over the same chord. I suggest you look those up and learn how to work them into your style.
#5
i dont like that website i use this one onstead
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?scch=C&scchnam=Major&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1
i like that one because it shows you the scale on the whole fretboard

theres no such thing as a little scale there just pattern of notes
things will make alot more sense if you learn the notes of the fretboard and the intervals in the major scale
also look up www.musictheory.net
#6
Ok the major scale contains 8 notes (7 not including the octave). These notes appear all over the fretboard so when you play a "little scale" its all the notes of the scale within one octave. You can then move those notes around the fretboard into other octaves and this is where you see people moving around the neck. Each of those positions is a different pattern to play the same scale somewhere else on the neck (try reading the article instead of just looking at the picture) where the R is the root note of the scale.

So if you were to take a C major scale (relative to Am) and find all the notes you would get C (root), D, E, F, G, A, B, C (octave). Now if you take a neck diagram (also available on that site under blank pages i believe) and fill in everywhere on the guitar neck where those notes appear you will get all the notes you can possibly play on guitar within the C scale. You can play any of those notes and they will be within the scale, but applying that to make your solos sound good will require a bit more work than that.
#7
wait so you say i could use it in any major song if i move the root of the scale, how do i do that?

and guys, thanks but i might learn the extended pentatonic after i learn the major scale, my brain can only take so much info at one time
#8
major Scale = Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do

And the note progression goes W-W-H-W-W-W-H; Where W= whole note, H = half note.

Knowing that, and practicing it a little bit, really helps to remember the scale at any position on the neck.
#9
Quote by Concat
major Scale = Do-Re-Mi-Fa-Sol-La-Ti-Do

And the note progression goes W-W-H-W-W-W-H; Where W= whole note, H = half note.

Knowing that, and practicing it a little bit, really helps to remember the scale at any position on the neck.



What does that stuff mean? the do re mi etc.
#10
It’s a very well known little song popularized in the film the Sound of Music. I’m surprised you’ve never heard of it.

It’s the major scale. You sing it “Doe Rai Me Fa So La Te Doe.” As you can see, there are 8 notes and the Doe repeats itself. The end Doe is one octave higher than the beginning.

Look on youtube and you’ll understand. It’s just an easy way of remembering it, that’s all.

Rai is one whole note higher than Doe. Me is one whole note higher than Rai. Fa is one HALF note higher than Me. Hence the WWHWWWH progression

Whole note = two frets. Half note = one fret.
#11
Quote by TheShizzNizz
wait so you say i could use it in any major song if i move the root of the scale, how do i do that?

and guys, thanks but i might learn the extended pentatonic after i learn the major scale, my brain can only take so much info at one time

Yeah as soon as you learn one major scale (say A major) all over the fretboard if you move the root note over to say a G instead of an A (2 frets back) then if you play the exact same patterns/intervals however you view it you will be playing the G major scale.

I'm just starting with this stuff as well, it's awesome because after you knock the first scale down (master it all over the fretboard, vertically/horizontally/sideways, etc, etc) the others come MUCH quicker.
#12
Quote by TheShizzNizz
What does that stuff mean? the do re mi etc.


It's called Solfège: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solf%C3%A8ge Basically if you can remember the song "Do-re-mi" from The Sound of Music... it's that but in an official system used for teaching aspects of singing and music.

In this context I really don't think it helps at all in this case, it really is more related to singing in my opinion.

Quote by TheShizzNizz
wait so you say i could use it in any major song if i move the root of the scale, how do i do that?


Right, I'm going to go back to the positions way of thinking just to help explain this to you:

If you take the first position of the major scale (the "E" shape on Justin's site) and move it so that the notes marked with the "R" are on a different note so you move them from, say, A (where you'd be playing A major) to, for example, C you would then be playing C major.

Of course this means that the rest of the "positions" have to move with it and you need to keep track of where they end up being. This is why, the more you get into playing in different keys, it becomes more important to understand scales as notes and intervals and to know the fretboard's notes.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
Quote by -TM-
Yeah as soon as you learn one major scale (say A major) all over the fretboard if you move the root note over to say a G instead of an A (2 frets back) then if you play the exact same patterns/intervals however you view it you will be playing the G major scale.

I'm just starting with this stuff as well, it's awesome because after you knock the first scale down (master it all over the fretboard, vertically/horizontally/sideways, etc, etc) the others come MUCH quicker.



ohh so what key is that BIG scale then with all the patterns i posted? i want have a slow jam to it on a backing track on youtube

and thanks il look it up on youtube
#14
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

In this context I really don't think it helps at all in this case, it really is more related to singing in my opinion.


I dunno... it helps you recognize what the scale sounds like. I mean, obviously it doesn't help if you already know what it sounds like, but it's good if you're just starting to learn it. Singer or guitarist - it's still music.
#15
Quote by TheShizzNizz
ohh so what key is that BIG scale then with all the patterns i posted? i want have a slow jam to it on a backing track on youtube

and thanks il look it up on youtube


The scale that Justin has on that lesson you posted in the first post doesn't have a key because none of it is really fret-specific, it's just a bunch of patterns that you can put where you need; place the notes marked "R" on the note of the key of the song you're playing and it'll be fine.

Quote by Concat
I dunno... it helps you recognize what the scale sounds like. I mean, obviously it doesn't help if you already know what it sounds like, but it's good if you're just starting to learn it. Singer or guitarist - it's still music


Why sing to get the sound of a scale if you have an want to play a guitar? Especially if you're not a particularly proficient singer; you're more likely than not to be singing it wrong anyway.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Why sing to get the sound of a scale if you have an want to play a guitar? Especially if you're not a particularly proficient singer; you're more likely than not to be singing it wrong anyway.


I think you're over emphasizing my point. I was just bringing it up because it's a well known song, and it is the major scale. If you're playing up and down the scale, and it sounds like do re me fa so la ti do, then you're on the right track.

It's just very recognizable... and it help to recognize what a scale sounds like. I definately never suggested he practice singing it in his bedroom :P

But it's a moot point anyways cause he didn't even know what it was.
#18
Quote by TheShizzNizz
ohh so what key is that BIG scale then with all the patterns i posted?


Let me give you a noob perspective on scale theory since that is what I am. I learned my pentatonics shapes first, then I got to understand how those shapes made one shape across the neck, then how that shape moves up and down depending on what your root location is. I started with the C F and G Major pentatonic which doesn't give you any odd shape on the nut side of the neck. Once I understood all this I started to work on the intervals and got away from shapes, once I knew my intervals it made it easier to jump into Minor pentatonics, also helps to understand your relative minors for that. With all that ingrained into my brain I am working on my Major Scale but this time I'm not memorizing shapes because I apply my intervals and I see the neck in a whole different way from when I started.

Many experienced players will say learn your Major Scale first, the way I see it as a noob the less I have to start with will make it that much easier. I obviously knew of the Major Scale as a beginner but I can tell you those extra notes made it seem incredibly more difficult.

Some people have been playing so long they forget how tough it is to learn to play let alone grasp theory. I understand why that is because I look back and say "I can't believe I thought that was hard" and yet it was hard, incredibly hard. Maybe this approach worked for me because I started to learn to play guitar and theory at the same time, perhaps having played for a while first then jumping in would benefit from a different approach. Anyways, it's working for me so maybe it'll work for you.
#19
If you play those scales at the same point, with the first note being the root, you'll end up with a different mode. www.gosk.com
Once you understand how scales work, modes can help you with your phrasing and sound

Learn the pentatonic first. It's basically the Major/Minor scales without certain notes. Once you've got the pent down, you can add those notes in, and bam, instant major/minor scale.
I have a ponytail fetish.
..And a labcoat fetish. SCIENCE!
Last edited by AntiG3 at Jul 26, 2010,
#20
Quote by AntiG3
If you play those scales at the same point, with the first note being the root, you'll end up with a different mode. www.gosk.com
Once you understand how scales work, modes can help you with your phrasing and sound


Once you understand you'll stop giving people bad advice. Modes are nowhere near as simple as just playing the same notes from a different starting point.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.