#1
Me and my group are looking to write songs, whats the best way to do this? Just come together and write out music, write it out individually and show it to the group? What do you guys think? We write our music in standard notation and tablature, whats the best way to write songs for a group together?
#2
Well, from a bandmate, Me and my band, this is how we write;

One person comes up with a concept/riff/progression on their own
At the next practice, they present it to me and the guys
We critique, suggest modifications, or build off it

We've written 7 great songs this way; most important thing to do though is have fun. If you're not having fun as a band, your music is going to be weak
How many guitar players does it take to change a light bulb?

Twelve. One to change the bulb and eleven to say they could do it better.

#3
Quote by Triple-D
whats the best way to write songs for a group together?


There is no "best" way.

Try stuff out, see what works for you.
shred is gaudy music
#4
There's no correct answer to this question. For every group/songwriter, it'll be different.

Personally, I write music mostly on my own. When I've played in bands, generally other people have been the primary songwriters for the bands, and they'll bring in riffs/progressions/lyrics/whatever, and we'll work it all out into a real song as a group.

For me, group writing tends to be frustrating. It takes a hell of a lot of patience, which I don't always possess when it comes to songwriting.

With that said, I think it's very important for everyone in the band to have the opportunity to put their stamp on a song, no matter who brought in the original idea.
#5
Quote by vikkyvik
For me, group writing tends to be frustrating. It takes a hell of a lot of patience, which I don't always possess when it comes to songwriting.

When we (my former bands and me) were creating lyrics it was very frustating, too, like vikkyvik said, if we tried to do this altogether. Everyone has a lot of ideas and wants to get this into the new song and often it's ending up in chaos and frustration. I've learned that it's better if someone has a concret idea where others can build on. Another conflict is when it comes to write lyrics. If you are not speaking the language natively that you want to sing (e.g. English), there is the next discussion.
For that reason i've founded the native speaker lyrics check to get help with my lyrics or help others with their lyrics. When you experience those porblems, too feel free to ask someone in the group for help
◘~(ô0)==>
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#6
Quote by Triple-D
Me and my group are looking to write songs, whats the best way to do this? Just come together and write out music, write it out individually and show it to the group? What do you guys think? We write our music in standard notation and tablature, whats the best way to write songs for a group together?


well id say individually is best..then at pratice you bring all your ideas together then pratice individually on your own time..

i think it would be best to record your ideas and such its much easyer then tabs and stuff.

lyrics you can do as a whole sinces its about the only thing you can do until your song and the parts are completed if you have 3 or 4 ppl helping the write lyrics it seems to turn out pretty good youll end up with a shit load of words and pick out the best..if you got 4 ppl 4 out of 10 versus should be pretty good right? lol
#8
If you don't understand theory (or if you don't have pitch perfect hearing) I would not recommend the "Let's just play and see what happens approach". No one will know what anyone is doing and you'll get bored and waste time.

Is there a main songwriter or does everyone work on it together? I found it easier if one person would basically write the majority of the song, bring it to practice, and then work on the finer details as a band. If no one likes the song then disregard it and think of something else.
#9
Quote by Calibos
If you don't understand theory (or if you don't have pitch perfect hearing) I would not recommend the "Let's just play and see what happens approach". No one will know what anyone is doing and you'll get bored and waste time.


So if you don't understand theory or "just play and see what happens"

HOW THE HECK DO YOU WRITE A SONG?!?!?!

I'm being serious - honestly help me out here
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#10
I meant don't just spontaneously all break into a jam, create some ideas or work on a structure first, if no one knows what they're doing then it's just going to be a wall of sound with everyone playing different stuff.

If you're playing alone then by all means, go nuts! Write whatever you want, it's your idea.
If you're at band practice, then don't all just noodle around hoping to come up with something. Use your time more productively.

Just my opinion.
Last edited by Calibos at Oct 15, 2010,
#11
Quote by Triple-D
Me and my group are looking to write songs, whats the best way to do this? Just come together and write out music, write it out individually and show it to the group? What do you guys think? We write our music in standard notation and tablature, whats the best way to write songs for a group together?


Use what you know. Whatever works best for you. Writing music together is basically communication. Use whatever means you have, and skill sets you have together to get the job done. If it works for you, thats what matters. Every member's dynamics in the group are different from one band to the next. For example, in my acoustic trio - I'm the guitarist and the singer and my originals have already been more or less written, but many need fleshing out. So, in writing, I get together with them, and list out the priorities.

Since I play and sing, one of my priorities is that there be given a sense of space and not distraction, so that I can comfortably sing over the groove. One way of facilitating this, is I record our practices and point out to the drummer and bassist where its working and where it isn't. Beyond those parameters I give them creative freedom.

In someone else's band the dynamics and communication may work differently.

Best,

Sean