#1
So yeah, I'm a metalhead, and I'd like to check out and learn to play some jazz. What should I start with?
Yeah
#2
I'm a metalhead too and i've recently learned City Lights by Steffen Schackinger. It has a jazzy intro and a long shred solo, so i highly recommend checking it out.
In the 22nd century, how many guitarists is needed to replace a light source?

Five. One to actually do it, and four to reminisce about how much better the old tubes were.


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#3
I'd just start off learning some basic information about jazz. Such as chordal structures and common scales. That should help once you start playing.
I'm a musician/composer before I'm a guitar player.

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#4
John McLaughlin and Wes Montgomery if you're only interested in playing Jazz for some odd reason. Listen to some Miles Davies (Kind of Blue) and Coltrane. Also I find Sonny Rollins has some great jazz albums that should be easy enough for a Jazz newb to grasp.
#5
Quote by TehDutchDude
So yeah, I'm a metalhead, and I'd like to check out and learn to play some jazz. What should I start with?



The first thing I would suggest is listen to some jazz. Google "Jazz Standards" and check out what the common titles are, and maybe check them out on Pandora.

Jazz can be and sound very complicated, so make sure that you listen to a lot of it, because there can be a lot of it that doesn't sound musical to your ears. Traditionally Jazz Players use notes that aren't notes wed think or know how to use. This can be a bit jarring and even confusing to the ear.

Listen to it with an open mind and learn which ones you like and start there.

Do you have a music theory background? There's a saying about Jazz, and that is if you can play Jazz you can learn practically anything else.

Best,

Sean
#6
As for listening, check out:
Dave Brubeck - Time Out
Ben Webster - See You At The Fair
Art Blakey - Paris Jam Session (1959)
Miles Davis - Birth of The Cool
Follow the smoke toward the riff filled land
brutal
#7
I'd start slowly, start to learn all your chords. Major, minor. Major and minor 7th's, dominant 7ths. (the same with 6ths, 9ths, ect..) All types of extended and inverted chords. I assume you already know the major scale? You're going to need to brush up on your theory most likely, and I couldn't play any jazz until I started practicing with jazz players frequently.
Last edited by Peaceful Rocker at Jul 26, 2010,
#8
Hey guys, I'm interested in listening it as well as playing it. I wanna broaden my musical horizon a bit. I'm pretty decent with my theoretical knowledge, I can harmonize anything, I can name the notes in chords etc. and right now I'm learning what notes resolve to eachother.
Yeah
#9
Quote by Peaceful Rocker
I'd start slowly, start to learn all your chords. Major, minor. Major and minor 7th's, dominant 7ths. (the same with 6ths, 9ths, ect..) All types of extended and inverted chords. I assume you already know the major scale? You're going to need to brush up on your theory most likely, and I couldn't play any jazz until I started practicing with jazz players frequently.


Yeah I know my theory fairly decent... as a metalhead I am a bit unfamiliar with all the sevenths chords. Triads are no problem for me whatsoever. I'm gonna go check out the list though, should get me started
Yeah
#10
Well, jazz is not something you can learn some of, like you can learn some Nirvana or some Led Zeppelin. Sure, you could learn some chord-melody arrangements (in that case, Barry Galbraith has a book with a great collection), but jazz is learned by tunes and that means understanding the melody, understanding the harmony, being able to improvise within that context and to play chord-melody style. It's more like that.
If you're really serious, you could get some theory book (Mark Levine's fine), some fake books and some Jamey Aebersold's Play-Alongs - they're excellent! And there's a forum dedicated to jazz guitar: http://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/

And now for listening, I guess you want to start with guitar. So here are a few suggestions.

Check some Django Reinhardt, who was probably the first really great jazz guitarist (if we don't count older guys like Eddie Lang). He is most famous for his gypsy-driven, lightning-fast acoustic style. I guess there was never before and never since so much energy in jazz guitar playing, not to mention that all the melodies he played really made sense and fit perfectly. You probably already know that he played all solos with only two fingers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEzsPGHsi90

Then there was that bop style of playing. It's probably the most classic jazz guitar playing, usually played on archtops like Gibson L-5 or Gibson Super 400. It started with Charlie Christian and saw many great players like Tal Farlow, Barney Kessel, Kenny Burrell, Jimmy Raney, Herb Ellis, Wes Montgomery, Jim Hall and for me personally, Johnny Smith best represents this era. The guy had it all - lightning speed, thoughtful chord-melody, sweet tone, improvisational genius. Others may prefer someone else, of course. There is an 8-CD set called Johnny Smith - The Complete Roost Johnny Smith Small Group Sessions that is worth getting. Oh yeah, and Joe Pass, the master of chord-melody. He and Herb Ellis made some great duets, check them out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xf3rAXoYjA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFps6V5o8y4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YnMmb1r_X5s&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eo_F-xrsOqo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GWm_IYab74k

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MOm17yw__6U

Later, guys like Pat Martino and George Benson continued playing in that style, but introducing new influences.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WWP9EnvHao

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tn27IcAapPI

Then there are those ''younger'' guys from fusion era and smooth jazz era (and all that contemporary stuff), namely John McLaughlin, Bill Connors, Pat Metheny, John Scofield, Mike Stern, Allan Holdsworth, Al Di Meola, Frank Gambale, Larry Coryell, Larry Carlton, Lee Ritenour...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBW1xU560T4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FL6dy1J_dxU

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cF64qcwReMI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77VAZSAD3CM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E55ppCnwT3w

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wu-k7wmFCT8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfchN7G-oQk

And be sure to listen to other players as well, not just guitarists. Especially saxophonists like John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Sonny Rollins, Wayne Shorter, Benny Golson, Michael Brecker, Joe Lovano, Coleman Hawkins, Pharoah Sander, trumpeters Dizzy Gillespie, Art Farmer, Miles Davis, Louis Armstrong, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, Clifford Brown, Roy Eldridge, pianists Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, Duke Ellington, Oscar Peterson, McCoy Tyner, Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett, Bud Powell, (double) bassists Charles Mingus, Paul Chambers, Ron Carter, Dave Holland, Miroslav Vitous, Jaco Pastorius, Stanley Clarke, Victor Wooten, Jonas Hellborg, Kai Eckhardt, drummers Art Blakey, Papa Jo Jones, Philly Joe Jones, Max Roach, Gene Krupa, Tony Williams, Buddy Rich, Elvin Jones, Billy Cobham, Michael Walden, Roy Haynes, Kenny Clarke.

Perhaps these albums would be a good start?
Art Blakey - Moanin'
Dave Brubeck - Time Out
Max Roach and Clifford Brown
Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane
John Coltrane - Crescent
John Coltrane - Giant Steps
Miles Davis - Kind of Blue
Miles Davis - Prince of Darkness
Wayne Shorter - Speak No Evil
Sonny Rollins - Saxophone Colossus

Have fun!
#11
start by listening alot (id recomend kind of blue, charlie parkers complete savoy or dial recordings, the clifford brown/max roach quintet and coltranes giant steps album for accessible jazz), Id also start learning chords, starting with diatonic triads and seventh chords (1-3-7 voicing and 1-5-7-3 for starters) in every key and possible position, as well as the modes of the major (though dorian, ionian, mixolydian and locrian are the most important ones) and harmonic minor scales, and of course the blues scale and seventh chord arpeggios. Then id find easy jazz standards and memorize the heads and chords, and practice simple improvisation with a metronome (beginning with only playing whole notes if neccesary) as well as lots of transcription.
#14
personally, I reckon if you want to hear some mad jazz but still love metal, then fusion is definitely the way to go; from there you can slowly immerse yourself into more the hardcore jazz recordings

Also, as someone already said, listen to Django, he was basically the pinnacle of technical guitar playing (with truly incredible ideas too)
#15
And there are also many great guitarists in France who grew in Django's tradition. The most famous one is probably Bireli Lagrene:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2MO8jpDC1s

Here are a few tunes (so called standards) you could start with. They originally weren't jazz tunes but usually come from Broadway, though they were often played by jazz bands. I chose their vocal interpretations for the sake of simplicity.

Stella by Starlight: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UZ0xqdP2rw

There is also a nice version by Sarah Vaughan on youtube that is much slower, but Anita's version has the right tempo for this tune, I think.

Autumn Leaves: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rvue38ub1gc

This is played in a variety of tempos, but it's originally a ballad called Les feuilles mortes. And a guitar rendition by Hank Garland: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TL_G9Y_buks

Autumn in New York: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50zL8TnMBN8

A harder tune, but the melody is just great.

My Funny Valentine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pgy4UPAm6Ik

Beautiful harmony this tune has.

All the Things You Are: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97p6gQnlO5Y

And here's a guitar rendition by Howard Roberts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XsWWM3eKYM
#16
Quote by Slayertplsko
And there are also many great guitarists in France who grew in Django's tradition. The most famous one is probably Bireli Lagrene:



problem with bireli though is that he makes you want to put down the guitar
#17
Keep in mind that there are a number of different genres of jazz, all of differing levels of cultural and musical complexity. There's dixieland, swing, bebop, modal, smooth (**** that), fusion, etc... There's nu-jazz, which is jazz set to a hip hop beat, and even newgrass, which is jazz played in the style of bluegrass.

You can't just learn "jazz", anymore than you can just play straight up "rock" music. The term is so vague as to be absolutely meaningless without the specification of a subtype.

So if I were you, I'd figure out what kind of jazz I want to play and study that. If you just try to tackle the whole beast of jazz as a whole, you'll easily be overwhelmed and all you'll get out of it will likely be a few bebop heads and a funny-looking chord or two. Learn the theory, and the technique comes from there. You have to be PASSIONATE for the music, you have to understand it's roots unless you just want to sound like another soulless fusion guitarist, playing something that's ultimately both shitty jazz and shitty metal. Jazz comes from a mixture of big band music with blues inflection, and the rhythms, idioms and cadences of the genre are all contained therein, however hidden.
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I just learn the formula, apply it to a key, and use said notes on fretboard. Why? Cuz I'm not a pussy.