#1
Is it drums, bass, guitars, then vocals?

What if I have the riff thought up first before the drums and bass?
How do I build upon it?

Also, can you please lend tips on how to make more guitar riffs to link with the previous?
#2
Well in my band, we record drums, bass, rhythm guitar, vocals.
The rhythm section is the most important part so we get that stuff done first. The first drum track is sometimes used as a sort of place holder and then he drummer goes back and records his real part which helps accent the rest of the song.

We sometimes do this also with the guitars and we record guitar solos separately.

It also helps to have a song completed before you record. so everyone knows their part.
#3
pretty random question,i think once u get a bit of a voice on your own guitar playing and have been playing for a while u will find alot of riffs u make up will go together whether it be a riff that 5 years old or 1 u made up last week,well for anyways lol,hope that helps,with recording question i can really only say we all jam and hit record,ive yet to record professionly but its happening in very near future.
#4
Quote by austhrax
pretty random question,i think once u get a bit of a voice on your own guitar playing and have been playing for a while u will find alot of riffs u make up will go together whether it be a riff that 5 years old or 1 u made up last week,well for anyways lol,hope that helps,with recording question i can really only say we all jam and hit record,ive yet to record professionly but its happening in very near future.


He hit a good point on jamming.

If you are just working on something with everyone getting a camcorder or some other kind of good quality recording device can help also.
#5
Quote by Axim Bassist
He hit a good point on jamming.

If you are just working on something with everyone getting a camcorder or some other kind of good quality recording device can help also.


yes jamming is the best,i played mainly on my own and was quite stale over the years,just getting our own band going in the last year or so and its def the best way to create,we only jam once a wekk and even then we are making 1 or 2 new song ideas a week.
#6
I've never found it all that important, i usually record guitar first as that is the initial idea for me, then add the drums and bass and put some vocals over the top of it.
A good thing to build on what you have is to decorate it, a good one is a guitar that occasionally plays quietly and panned in one ear at about 50%. Or you can add another instrument like a keyboard (depending on the genre) which can add a lot of depth to the track.

Linking riffs for me is usually a process of elimination and really thinking about what I want to hear, if you plan it out and then try to play what's in your head it will speed up your writing a lot rather than fumbling around looking for a nice resolution.
#7
If you've got an idea for a riff, track it with a click. Then it's easier to add drums later without too much trouble.
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#8
usually the rhythm section records first. i dont record drums per se, i program them, but they still go down first. or at least a rough sketch of the drums goes down first, which can then be accented later. rhythm guitar is typically second for me, but most people would do bass. im not a good bassist, so i like to follow the guitar a bit, hence tracking it second. lead guitar typically comes after bass and vocals always come last.

now this doesnt mean this is how i always do it. sometimes its just a guitar to a click and everything else comes later as i sort of "jam" to my own looped backing. this works well if you dont have the parts finished yet.

ive said it before and im sure ill say it again, you record with the method that is best for the song. this isnt the same for every band, and isnt the same for every song.
#9
I usually do "basic" drums first (tweak them later if need be) - works great to keep timings... no need for a metronome that way. I've done a few with the bass-line first. The drums and bass both work to aid in timing.
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Last edited by strangedogs at Jul 26, 2010,
#11
As someone who has tried adding drums to other pre-recorded parts.... if you can avoid it, stay far, far away.

If the stuff you play originally - riffs or whatever - isn't done to a click, your most likely end result will be a train wreck.

If it IS done to a click, it now comes down to the drummer. If the drummer can play to a click because s/he is USED to playing to a click, then you'll be fine.

If your drummer has never played to a click, you'll find yourself in a train wreck again.

If your drummer says "yeah, I think I can play to a click," then you'll probably end up with a drum track that will either not work, or will "sort of" work because it sounds like the drummer is following the track rather than the instruments following the drummer.

CT
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#12
Depends on the song usually...I always do drums first (either with a click, or scratch guitar)...but some songs I'll do the rhythm guitar first, then bass, lead, vocals...other songs I'll do bass, rhythm, lead, vocals.
#13
I use the cheapest programs available (freeware) and get decent quality out of them. Listen to my song I wrote on youtube. I come up with a catchy guitar lick first and play off of that. I then make a drum beat, and start building from there with other instruments. I would love to sing, but I suck so bad, I've given that up completely. I think you need to have a general idea what you want the song to sound like before you record anything though.
#14
Guide track from guitars normally first played to a click. Then the drummer plays along to that track and a click. Then mix drums. i'm not sure what the order is for Bass and Rhythm Guitars but i tend to do them Rhythm Guitars first then Bass. Finally Lead Guitars then Vocals.
#15
Well I'm making music all alone by myself.
Drums and bass are all programmed.
So far I have been tracking Riff ideas and then putting drums and bass on them, and retaking the guitars again.

Also, what is quad tracking? Does that mean 2 rhythms and 2 leads?
#16
quad tracking would be tracking the same part 4 times. typically they are panned differently, with 2 parts to a side (for guitars anyway). basicly it is double tracking, done twice.
#18
Yeah, 4 separate performances. it tends to get used for slower heavier riffs. Thrash bands tend to use Double tracking.

i heard a good panning setup for Quad tracking is:
L1: L80 - L100
L2: L70 - L80
R1: R80 - R100
R2: R70 - R80
#19
Quote by Clay-man
So 2 rhythms on each pan? Sounds tedious.

tedious, and depending on what you are doing, it can be completly useless. double tracking the rhythm guitar usually seems enough for me for most stuff. more and ive found things to get muddy.

now i have triple tracked a part. and with 2 mics on each part, i ended up with 6 guitar tracks. but that was more because i used two mics on each acoustic part, and then 2 on the electric track.

if you are going for parts with differering tones, then quad tracking (double of 2 tones) might work. but for 4 of the same track, i typically dont see the point.