#1
So i took a guitar class in high school. and in the class, we learned the basic open chords. and we practiced those with I, IV, V7 chord progressions. so like C, F, then G7.

right now i really only know the progessions for: D, A, G, E, Em, Am, and C chords. so obviously i don't know many chords and i want to learn more. so my question is, how do you go about learning new chords? do you just pick them up when learning new songs or do you just go down the list and learn them?

also are there other chord progressions other than I, IV, V7? cause i like practicing chords with progressions
#2
When you say "new chords" do you mean new shapes or new types of chords?

And yes, there are plenty of other types of progressions. The ones that jump out at me are I IV V and II V I, but there are plenty more.
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#3
Best way to learn new chords is by using them in a song, or songs. Practice and learn by doing.

Chord progressions? There are several. The I, IV, V7, or I, IV, V is very common, but there are MANY, MANY others. Try a Google search on chord progressions and it'll make you dizzy.
#4
I tend to pick up new chords from learning songs. One of my favourites is the Sus4 barre chord

Try it out, maybe you'll like it too

Gsus4

e-3
B-3
G-5
D-5
A-3
E-3
#5
Quote by patrickodang
right now i really only know the progessions for: D, A, G, E, Em, Am, and C chords. so obviously i don't know many chords and i want to learn more. so my question is, how do you go about learning new chords? do you just pick them up when learning new songs or do you just go down the list and learn them?

You mean positions, not progressions. And chords have a formula that you use to figure out the notes in them:

Major chord - Root, major third, perfect fifth (e.g. C major = C, E, G)
Minor chord - Root, minor third, perfect fifth (e.g. C minor = C, Eb, G)

And from there you can find you the positions.

The basic open major and minor chords are the ones you mentioned right there plus Dm.
The others are usually played as barre chords -- you usually make the E, Em, A or Am shapes with your middle, ring and pinky fingers (well, you don't need all three for the Em shape) and take them up to a different fret, putting your index over all 6 strings, behind it. (Sorry if that came out a little confusing. I advise you to look at lessons about chord construction here on UG.)

Quote by patrickodang
also are there other chord progressions other than I, IV, V7? cause i like practicing chords with progressions

A progression is a combination of chords. You can combine them in whichever way you like.


Anyway, since you can play a "stripped-down version" of most pop or rock songs with just guitar chords, you can choose songs you like and try to play them. You'll find new chords and progressions.
Last edited by sickman411 at Jul 26, 2010,
#6
Quote by sickman411
You mean positions, not progressions. And chords have a formula that you use to figure out the notes in them:

Major chord - Root, major third, perfect fifth (e.g. C major = C, E, G)
Minor chord - Root, minor third, perfect fifth (e.g. C minor = C, Eb, G)

And from there you can find you the positions.

The basic open major and minor chords are the ones you mentioned right there plus Dm.
The others are usually played as barre chords -- you usually make the E, Em, A or Am shapes with your middle, ring and pinky fingers (well, you don't need all three for the Em shape) and take them up to a different fret, putting your index over all 6 strings, behind it. (Sorry if that came out a little confusing. I advise you to look at lessons about chord construction here on UG.)


A progression is a combination of chords. You can combine them in whichever way you like.


Anyway, since you can play a "stripped-down version" of most pop or rock songs with just guitar chords, you can choose songs you like and try to play them. You'll find new chords and progressions.


yeah i really want to learn how to construct chords. what do i need to learn to be able to do that? just major and minor scales?
#7
You can buy a guitar chord dictionary. Hal Leonard has one. 2,500 chords with 5 different voices for each.

Or learn new songs. Or just play around. If you know theory you can find a chord and name it.

chordbook.com is good as well, but they don't have too many chords.
"He who loves practice without theory is like the sailor who boards ship without a rudder and compass and never knows where he may cast."

~Leonardo da Vinci
#8
Quote by c_foster88
You can buy a guitar chord dictionary. Hal Leonard has one. 2,500 chords with 5 different voices for each.

Or learn new songs. Or just play around. If you know theory you can find a chord and name it.

chordbook.com is good as well, but they don't have too many chords.


i have a chord book called "the fender chord finder"

the problem is, there are so many that idk which ones to learn.
#9
1. Harmonic Progession
2. Inversions
3. Secondary Domz
4. Add rythm and repeat

Chord books are good to draw stuff from
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#10
Quote by patrickodang
So i took a guitar class in high school. and in the class, we learned the basic open chords. and we practiced those with I, IV, V7 chord progressions. so like C, F, then G7.

right now i really only know the progessions for: D, A, G, E, Em, Am, and C chords. so obviously i don't know many chords and i want to learn more. so my question is, how do you go about learning new chords? do you just pick them up when learning new songs or do you just go down the list and learn them?

also are there other chord progressions other than I, IV, V7? cause i like practicing chords with progressions



There are a lot of ways. Learning the essentials of triads for example eliminates the most important 3 notes that make up a chord. From then on it's extensions and expanded harmony.

Then next note to learn are sevenths to add to triads, which determine if they are actually 7ths or b7ths. From there 9ths are static, 11ths are static except its better to use a #11 when doing a Major 11. 13ths are also static.

Know your sharps and flats and when you read a chord like an A7b9, and couple it with an extensive knowledge of notes on the neck, and you can pretty much figure out or determine how to play any chord in existence.

By the way an A7b9 is A C# E G and Bb. This took about 3 seconds for me to name and write out. As you can see this is a pretty neat skill, and you'll never be caught in the dark about how to play a chord, nor will you ever "need" a chord book.

That's how I do every scale or chord. And I can name positions, inversions etc with about the same amount of ease.

With some chords it's a good idea to learn what notes can also be omitted, for an example in 11th and 13ths. Not every note needs to be used to imply a voicing.

Best,

Sean
#11
If you want to learn to construct chords I'd suggest you start with learning the notes of the neck and the Major scale (so you understand it in terms of notes, steps (WWHWWWH) and intervals - Root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc).

Then you can learn to harmonise the scale to form chords - and understand where they come from. A major triad is Root, Major 3rd, Perfect 5th - which is the 1st, 3rd and 5th notes of the correspondng major scale.

As far as chord progressions go - try experimenting. Put different chords together in different orders and see what you like. When you understand the major scale better and how to harmonise it then its worth looking into commonly used chord progressions, and understanding what chords lead well into other chords. But for now have a play and see what sounds good to you
#12
Personally I like to learn new chords by learning new songs. It helps me to have a reference point (the song) for the way the chord sounds rather than just practicing it by itself.

Typically I'll use Satriani's FRET-STRUM-MUTE or 1-2-3 method of practicing chords. It's pretty simple. Set a metronome to 30 BPM to start off. On the first click you fret the chord, second click you strum it, third click you mute it by relaxing the fingers in your fretting hand. I like to practice 3-4 chords at a time like this.

Pretty simple process but it helps me learn chords pretty quick. Once I've got the shape under my fingers I'll go back to the song and practice it in context.