#1
I've been playing guitar for a couple of years but I've always had trouble using a slide. I can't seem to figure out how to use the slide without hitting other notes or without getting a terrible sound. I appreciate any tips. Also, does it depend on which type of slide I'm using? I have a glass tube right now that somebody gave me, but I've noticed some people use a metal one. Thanks!
#2
playing exactly over the frets not between them thats the secret said my guitar teacher

and somehow dampening the other strings but I'm not sure exactly about how to do that
Last edited by libertines4ever at Jul 27, 2010,
#3
The material used is mostly just what kind of tone you're going for. As for actually using one, what I did was start fiddling with it on the high e string. When you get the hang of that, incorporate the b string and come up with little diddles. Once you have a grasp on all of the strings, look up some open tunings. These are tunings where all the strings can be played at once and it forms a chord (you might've already known that...) but with a slide you basically can't hit a sour note. From there it's just experimentation!
#5
Playing slide in standard tuning is really difficult unless you're very accurate, so just know that from the get-go.

In my opinion, it's best to start with an open tuning, specifically open D or open G. With regards to technique, wear the slide on either your ring or pinky finger, and you need to mute the strings behind the slide with your other fingers. Also, you'll have to develop a vibrato with the slide by shaking your whole hand. It's more similar to a classical vibrato than you're probably used to. Aim for the slide to be directly above the fret, rather than the wood in-between. Finally, playing licks is a little weird at first, because you basically have to memorize how utilizing each string sounds. Sometimes, it will sound really awkward to end a lick on a certain string, because of how the tuning is set-up. LOTS of trial and error.
#6
imo, learn to play slide in standard. that way you dont need to change the tuning. you can just pick up a slide and go. i do that all the time in band practice. we'll be playing and i or someone else will say "hey slide would sound good here" and i can just go right to it.

the "secret" is muting. its ALL about muting. make sure you have at least one finger behind the slide touching the strings to mute noise behind the slide. use your palm and free fingers to mute strings while playing single notes.

also make sure you play right over the fret when holding a note. other than that, its all practice. go on youtube and search for some lessons. there are some good ones that can at least give you some basic licks. finding ones in standard tuning can be harder. but you can transpose them all if you want.
#7
See my reply in the above thread about "deciding to tackle slide".

Me, I'm an open tuning guy. That's where virtually all the classic blues players are coming from.
If you don't want to re-tune all the time, get another axe. IMO, slide blues sounds best rather funky anyway, so you don't need a really primo axe.
David Lindley made a career out of rather crappy guitars...

Of course, I make my own; I'm a cigar-box "luthier".

However, Duane Allman got a lot of mileage out of playing in standard tuning; I think you can still find Coricidin bottles on eBay....
#8
Couple tips...

Make sure your slide is a snug fit to your finger. This is key.

Practice sliding licks without your slide a bit. Having a proficiency with sliding into and out of notes will help you out.

Allowing the weight of the slide to do the work. You don't want to press the string all the way down to the fretboard like when you fret a note - just a little pressure is all you need.

Having higher action will also help out quite a bit.

Start by learning slide songs in an open tuning; some of my favorites to play are Traveling Riverside Blues, When the Levee Breaks, and In My Time of Dying by Zeppelin. You can find the tabs right on UG.
#9
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
imo, learn to play slide in standard. that way you dont need to change the tuning. you can just pick up a slide and go. i do that all the time in band practice. we'll be playing and i or someone else will say "hey slide would sound good here" and i can just go right to it.

the "secret" is muting. its ALL about muting. make sure you have at least one finger behind the slide touching the strings to mute noise behind the slide. use your palm and free fingers to mute strings while playing single notes.

also make sure you play right over the fret when holding a note. other than that, its all practice. go on youtube and search for some lessons. there are some good ones that can at least give you some basic licks. finding ones in standard tuning can be harder. but you can transpose them all if you want.


You have to be careful with standard tuning though. You'll NEVER get a delta blues sound using standard tuning.
#10
Thanks a lot everybody, I really appreciate it. I haven't played with the slide in awhile because I could never quite figure it out, but after seeing what ya'll said..i think i'll give it another shot. Thanks again!
#12
Quote by STONESHAKER
Couple tips...

Make sure your slide is a snug fit to your finger. This is key.

Practice sliding licks without your slide a bit. Having a proficiency with sliding into and out of notes will help you out.

Allowing the weight of the slide to do the work. You don't want to press the string all the way down to the fretboard like when you fret a note - just a little pressure is all you need.

Having higher action will also help out quite a bit.

Start by learning slide songs in an open tuning; some of my favorites to play are Traveling Riverside Blues, When the Levee Breaks, and In My Time of Dying by Zeppelin. You can find the tabs right on UG.

"In my time of dying" is really fun..haven't quite got it figured out but it definitely sparked my interest in the slide..thanks a lot
#13
Quote by Bikewer
See my reply in the above thread about "deciding to tackle slide".

Me, I'm an open tuning guy. That's where virtually all the classic blues players are coming from.
If you don't want to re-tune all the time, get another axe. IMO, slide blues sounds best rather funky anyway, so you don't need a really primo axe.
David Lindley made a career out of rather crappy guitars...

Of course, I make my own; I'm a cigar-box "luthier".

However, Duane Allman got a lot of mileage out of playing in standard tuning; I think you can still find Coricidin bottles on eBay....



Duane Allman played almost exclusively in open E tuning.

Also a great way to get good at slide, or any technique is to listen to people who master that technique.

In addition to Duane Allman, you know should know Elmore James, Ron Wood, Derek Trucks, Robert Randolph, Warren Haynes, Ry Cooder, Sonny Landreth. Then depending on what genre you are looking to do go from there.
#14
I'm not very good using a slide but I know it's difficult on a guitar with a low action, try some open tunings as mentioned and use your left hand to mute strings not being picked
Nothing of me is original. I am the combined effort of everybody I've ever known.

¨°º¤ø„¸¸„ø¤º°¨