#1
My current board: MXR 10 Band, DD-7 in the loop.

TU-2, Decimator, MXR GT-OD, Little Big Muff, Phase 90, BF-2, Small Clone in front of the amp.

I have found that don't use many of these pedals that much, and they are adding a bunch of noise to my signal that I obviously don't want. I should mention my amp is a 1x12 JCM 900.

My idea: To keep the MXR Overdrive and the Decimator. I've had a tubescreamer and it didn't work well with my middy amp. As you guys know the Decimator is kinda like the quintessential noise gate. Replace my Boss Flanger with something else, possibly the MXR Micro Flanger? Also replace my TU-2 with a better tuner.

The whole point is consalidate my board down to what I actually use, and to make most of what I have true bypass. Also I'm going to replace the cables I have with higher quality ones, all in hope of reducing noise.

Suggestions for: True Bypass Tuner, True Bypass Flanger, quality cables.

Thanks.
Quote by progbass
right Metallica is a given. Personally I like to pretend the bus exploded and killed them all in '86.

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#2
Sorry you didn't get reply's. I hate it when that happens.

Sorry, but I can't really help. Not a pedal guy.
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#3
for a good tuner get the tc electronics polytune
Lets jump in a pool


_____________________________________________
Last edited by I am wet : Today at 03:26 XM.
#4
For a tuner, either the TC Poly Tune or Sonic Research Turbo Tuner. For a flanger, I can't really think of any that aren't expensive and true bypass. Maybe try an Ibanez FL9 and a true bypass looper? For cables, try lavacable.com. They sell a bunch of high quality cables, Mogami being the cheapest and still very nice. It's not as transparent as the higher end cables but much nicer than your average GC cable and Monster stuff. No noise either.
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#5
The TC Electronics Polytune is amazing. Works just as described (download the free iOS-app if you want to test it), and the LEDs are super bright.

Edit: Keeley sells some nice, modded Tubescreamers, you might want to check those out.
#7
There's really no reason to upgrade the tuner, especially if you're adding a lot of true bypass pedals, unless you're super anal about how in tune you are. How much are you looking to spend on a flanger? If you got money, the Foxrox TZF is pretty much the coolest flanger ever and the Strymon Flanger seems pretty cool, but for a bit more budget consciousness, the EH Flanger Hoax and DEM are great.
Board:
Pitchblack - Fulltone Octafuzz - Hardwire OD - Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina - MXR Micro Chorus - Diamond Memory Lane Jr - EHX SMMH - Neunaber Wet
#9
Quote by WtrPlyr
why

Because its cool...or something? The BF-2 is actually a pretty decent flanger, suposing you don't need/want through-zero (why you wouldn't want through-zero is beyond me though) or envelope flanging or other, more specific sounds

TS, how are you powering your pedals?
Board:
Pitchblack - Fulltone Octafuzz - Hardwire OD - Blakemore Effects Deus Ex Machina - MXR Micro Chorus - Diamond Memory Lane Jr - EHX SMMH - Neunaber Wet
Last edited by IsThereLoveInSp at Jul 27, 2010,
#10
I know True Bypass isn't all that, its more like if I'm going for something different why don't I make it true bypass? I power them through the 9V adapter that came with my pedalboard, pretty basic pretty cheap. Mainly I'm just anal about noise, I want to try to cut down the noise I get as much as possible. Thanks for the suggestions you guys, I'll check them out.
Quote by progbass
right Metallica is a given. Personally I like to pretend the bus exploded and killed them all in '86.

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#11
Quote by acdclandon
a better tuner.

TC Electronics Polytune, set to strobe mode. 0.5 cent accuracy, as compared to I think 3 cent accuracy in needle mode.

Quote by acdclandon
to make most of what I have true bypass

Mate, you're going to want at least one pedal with a buffer in there, otherwise your tone will lose a fuckton of treble. Has something to do with impedance; other users can explain it better than I can.

There are camps for buffered bypass and true bypass, but basically, the tl;dr is that if you use pedals, your tone will be coloured. End of. But if you want to keep your tone as close to what it would be guitar to amp, you're better off using a good mix of true bypass and pedals with high-quality buffers. If you're looking at going all true bypass, get a dedicated buffer pedal, and play around with where you want to stick it in the chain (I'd put it straight up front, personally).

Quote by acdclandon
they are adding a bunch of noise to my signal that I obviously don't want.

Also, the way that you are powering your pedals has a big effect on noise. If you are using a shitty adapter with a daisy chain to power many pedals, you're going to get a lot of noise. Fact of life. Some people swear by One-Spots; I've had shit-all luck with them. What you need is a proper power supply unit with isolated outputs, such as the T.Rex Fuel Tank Junior (which is what I have). It's a bullet you need to bite, and once it's bitten, you will not look back, trust me.

And I'd hang onto the 10 band, those things do end up coming in useful.
#12
Quote by NakedInTheRain
TC Electronics Polytune, set to strobe mode. 0.5 cent accuracy, as compared to I think 3 cent accuracy in needle mode.


Mate, you're going to want at least one pedal with a buffer in there, otherwise your tone will lose a fuckton of treble. Has something to do with impedance; other users can explain it better than I can.

There are camps for buffered bypass and true bypass, but basically, the tl;dr is that if you use pedals, your tone will be coloured. End of. But if you want to keep your tone as close to what it would be guitar to amp, you're better off using a good mix of true bypass and pedals with high-quality buffers. If you're looking at going all true bypass, get a dedicated buffer pedal, and play around with where you want to stick it in the chain (I'd put it straight up front, personally).


Also, the way that you are powering your pedals has a big effect on noise. If you are using a shitty adapter with a daisy chain to power many pedals, you're going to get a lot of noise. Fact of life. Some people swear by One-Spots; I've had shit-all luck with them. What you need is a proper power supply unit with isolated outputs, such as the T.Rex Fuel Tank Junior (which is what I have). It's a bullet you need to bite, and once it's bitten, you will not look back, trust me.

And I'd hang onto the 10 band, those things do end up coming in useful.


First of, I love Blood Sugar.

The Decimator is buffered bypass, so if I combined three bypass pedals with it wouldn't that work well?

Mmm, what I'm using now is really close to the one spot sort of idea. If someone did a test showing me the difference between in noise between something along the lines of a One-Spot and a isolated powered pedal that would be cool. Just in your experience how much difference would it make?
Quote by progbass
right Metallica is a given. Personally I like to pretend the bus exploded and killed them all in '86.

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#13
Quote by acdclandon
First of, I love Blood Sugar.

Word.

Quote by acdclandon
The Decimator is buffered bypass, so if I combined three bypass pedals with it wouldn't that work well?

Yeah that should work fine, forgot about the Decimator there for a second . It's got a high-quality buffer from what I've heard, so you're set in that department. However, I suggested putting a buffer at the start of the chain so you can drive a closer representation of your guitar's tone through your true bypass pedals, if that makes sense. Here's something you can try. Take one of your true bypass pedals, and run guitar through that pedal to amp. Play, then while the sound's still in your head, disconnect your guitar to pedal cable and plug straight into the amp. You will notice a lot more treble. The effect is even more noticeable when you use even more true bypass pedals. This is why they started making pedals with buffered bypass in the first place - originally, when pedals were first being made, they were all being wired for true bypass. Obviously this didn't work, so they discovered buffers, a part of the circuit which added treble to preserve the original guitar tone. And suddenly, crappy buffers which added too much treble and sucked bass were put onto decent pedals like the Digitech Whammy (*sigh*), which is what puts people off buffered bypass today. Hope you enjoyed the history lesson!

[quote="acdclandon[/QUOTE"]Mmm, what I'm using now is really close to the one spot sort of idea. If someone did a test showing me the difference between in noise between something along the lines of a One-Spot and a isolated powered pedal that would be cool. Just in your experience how much difference would it make?
For me, it made the world of difference. All of the background hiss that sounded like white noise combined with a hurricane - gone. I used to wince every time I turned on my amp. However, with a lot of pedals, you're going to get hiss eventually. Just with a decent dedicated power supply, you'll get a lot less of it - and this combined with a decent noise gate like the Decimator = win. Try it. Take your rig to a music store, and test out one of the Fuel Tank Juniors, or similar. I'm 99% certain that you'll detect a difference. I have a Fuel Tank Junior as I said, so if you want to ask me ANY question about it (yes, ANY) feel free. Don't feel like you're being stupid by asking what you think is a noob question - there is a difference between being stupid and not having knowledge. This is why we go to school/university for Christ's sake.
#14
Hmm I see, what would you recommend for a buffer?

Also would the fuel tank junior be your recommendation? I've heard of the voodoo lab one more commonly, and I think there might be an MXR one?
Quote by progbass
right Metallica is a given. Personally I like to pretend the bus exploded and killed them all in '86.

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#16
Quote by denied
Put the decimator right in front of your amp. Adjust the gate. Noise problem solved.


You think I haven't tried that? The noise isn't cut that much, and besides I'm playing at bedroom levels, at practice/gig levels the noise will probably be unbearable.
Quote by progbass
right Metallica is a given. Personally I like to pretend the bus exploded and killed them all in '86.

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#17
Korg Pitchblack. Planet Waves cable station pedalboard kit.

BTW, the Empress Para EQ is quieter than the MXR 10-band. And the Dr. Scientist The Cleanness EQ is even quieter.
#18
Quote by NakedInTheRain
Obviously this didn't work, so they discovered buffers, a part of the circuit which added treble to preserve the original guitar tone. And suddenly, crappy buffers which added too much treble and sucked bass were put onto decent pedals like the Digitech Whammy (*sigh*), which is what puts people off buffered bypass today. Hope you enjoyed the history lesson!

not at all how buffers work, but an interesting history lesson. sort of.


a perfect buffer will not add or subtract anything. no buffer should be adding anything, and good buffers will subtract very little. there is no treble added by a buffer, it is simply preserving what is present in your signal to start with.

if youve ever opened your guitar, you will have seen that the tone knob has a capacitor attached to the potentiometer. for those of you unfamiliar with electronics, the capacitor is the little brown thing (or sometimes green or orange). a potentiometer is a variable resistor. now, a long run of cable is modeled mostly by capacitors and resistors. longer cable run means more capacitors and resistors (sort of). so a longer cable is kind of like turning your tone knob down. and a true bypass pedal means there is nothing at all between those cable runs except for more cable.

with a buffer, you are breaking up the cable runs so you dont have the same impact. youve also some issues going on with a high impedance input and low impedance output, but that gets more involved and confusing.

now a bad buffer will suck off your low end, or high end, or mids, or whatever. it is often cheaper and easier to build a bad buffer, so those cheap boss pedals or whatever are giving buffers a bad name.


tl;dr:
i would recomend trying the ibanez fl-9 and the exh deluxe electric mistress for your flanger needs.
#19
Quote by acdclandon
Hmm I see, what would you recommend for a buffer?

Either the Lovepedal Line Driver or the JHS Little Black Buffer - I've heard both work great.

Quote by acdclandon
Also would the fuel tank junior be your recommendation? I've heard of the voodoo lab one more commonly, and I think there might be an MXR one?

I recommended the Fuel Tank Junior because it's cheap, but still very good quality. Have a look around, by all means, but make sure that the supply you get has isolated outputs. No Dunlop Brick for you!

Quote by jof1029
not at all how buffers work, but an interesting history lesson. sort of.

Bleurgh. I think that's what I was trying to say yesterday, preserving tone. Stupid jet-lag.
#20
For your tubescreamer, this might be of much or no use to you, but I have had a Boss Blues Driver for quite some time and just last night I applied some custom modifications to it. The stock model depletes the low end of your tone, which did not fly, and the dirt it added had this crackly decay noise which wasn't very good. It's all I had though, and it worked for a while, but I finally did this mod and it's perfect.

Swap capacitors C100 and C101 for 0.047uf Polyeurethane coated caps (a 2-pack is 1.49 at RadioShack.) This makes the tone knob less bipolar and more rounded out, so you can add just the right amount of treble without losing any bass before the knob hits 12'o-clock. The stock caps were 0.018uf

Swap capacitor C14 for a 0.1uf Polyeurethane cap. The stock one was 0.047uf. This swap allows all of the low end from your guitar to come through.

Then, take out diodes D9 and D10. If you look at diodes D7-D10, D7 and D8 are going one way (marked by the band on the little diode piece) and D9 and D10 go the other way. Anyways, replace D9 and D10 with a SINGLE 1N4001 diode. To do this, just make sure it's pointed the same way D9 and D10 were, then skip the middle two empty holes. This is the mod that makes the distortion itself sound 'real' and not like digital crackle.

This whole mod is basically the most important part of all the Blues Driver mods out there. Keeley's mod just swaps out a whole bunch of other caps for some silver caps to eliminate noise, which is one thing you said you wanted. You could order Keeley's modded one for $145 brand new, or get on ebay and get a working Blues Driver and do the mods yourself. If I were you I would just snag a used one, do the mod I just outlined for you, and if you find yourself needing noise reduction for whatever reason, follow the rest of Keeley's mod.

Sorry for the long post, but a Blues Driver is a different tonality than a Tubescreamer, and after I did this mod my so-so pedal became the EXACT tone I was looking for.
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