#1
I was just at the guitar store, picked up the S series Ibanez and at the back to adjust the floyd rose bridge was a wheel. As you turn it with your thumb it raises the floyd rose up and down so you can get it flush with the body. Which means you don't have to adjust the springs with a screw driver etc if u change string gauge.

I wanted to buy it on the spot, but resisted... lol.

It was my first time ever seeing this, is it common?

Why isn't this a standard option on all floyd rose guitars???

I dont own a Floyd Rose, part of the reason is the daily issues I see with it on this forum, most have to do with the adjustment. This wheel alone may change my mind...

#2
The Edge Zero has that too. Only the recent Ibanez trems have that feature. It is indeed a great feature. That plus the ZPS3 makes these Ibanez trems the perfect bridges for me.
#3
Quote by ChucklesMginty
It's not an OFR, it's Ibanez's ZR bridge. As an S owner myself, I can say it is indeed a God send. I can switch from standard to Drop C in about 5 minutes if I'm quick.


Ah okay. Thats sweet man.

The guy at the store didn't even know what he was talking about because he told me it was a Floyd Rose.
#4
Does Ibanez have this patented? Because if not, why is nobody else doing this? The ability to change your tremolo from floating to locked just with the spin of a knob and a quick retuning seems too good to be true.
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#5
Quote by necrosis1193
Does Ibanez have this patented? Because if not, why is nobody else doing this? The ability to change your tremolo from floating to locked just with the spin of a knob and a quick retuning seems too good to be true.

Probably because it requires redesigning the trem. And on top of that, it feels different than a traditional trem due to the ZPS3 which is removable. It's really hit or miss. If you look at RG's, some people prefer Edge Pro and others prefer the Edge Zero. Ibanez has been using their own licensed trems for over 20 years to great success. It took a while to get their reputation. If another company tries to redesign the trem, it won't have the name of a reputable brand. Pretty much the only respected double locking trems are OFRs, and some Ibanez trems. Not even Kahler is up there. Reputation is extremely important, especially since you would only see this feature in guitars over the $1000 price point. When someone is spending that kind money, they'll usually go with the tried and true. That's why things such as the Super-Vee never catch on. It seems like innovation is a guitarist's worst enemy.
#6
^Nice post, but a Kahler isn't a double locking trem
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#7
I would imagine that the people who design/create Floyd Rose trembolo's are OFR users themselves. I wonder if they look at the Ibanez ZR trembolo and wonder how they could incorporate a similar idea into their own system.

Obviously the wheel adjustment on the Ibanez is copyrighted and trademarked...

Floyd Rose should really think about a feature like this. There is always a way to do something differently (and sometimes, although not always, better).

Off the top of my head even a small opening to fit in an allen key would work. Or even something close to a guitar tuner. (These don't seem like better alternatives to a wheel, but its something)


and thanks for all your responses!
#8
Are these zr bridges only on the s series Ibanez? Don't the s series have only 22 frets or am i wrong?

They should start throwing these bridges on there rg's than i don't think i could resist buying one!!! I can change from 1/2 step down, to drop d, to full step without having to spend the whole day dicking around with the springs!
#10
Quote by necrosis1193
Does Ibanez have this patented? Because if not, why is nobody else doing this? The ability to change your tremolo from floating to locked just with the spin of a knob and a quick retuning seems too good to be true.


That's not really what it does. It just basically replaces the screwdriver. Instead of turning the screws to add or take tension, you turn the wheel. The ZR does come with a removable stop bar, which can block the trem for pull back only, but it does exactly what blocking an OFR does, except you can pull back, and not push down.


Quote by Judas89

They should start throwing these bridges on there rg's than i don't think i could resist buying one!!! I can change from 1/2 step down, to drop d, to full step without having to spend the whole day dicking around with the springs!


If you know how to adjust a ZR, than you can adjust an OFR, all the ZR does is replace the screws with wheel to turn, but adjusting is the same concept as an OFR. The tension of the springs has to eqqual the tension of the strings. To adjust the tension on an OFR, you turn the screws; to adjust it on a ZR, you turn a wheel.
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Last edited by biga29 at Jul 28, 2010,
#11
If you know how to adjust a ZR, than you can adjust an OFR, all the ZR does is replace the screws with wheel to turn, but adjusting is the same concept as an OFR. The tension of the springs has to eqqual the tension of the strings. To adjust the tension on an OFR, you turn the screws; to adjust it on a ZR, you turn a wheel.

Thats true, but it would probably be less hassle with the wheel, because you don't have to take the backplate off everytime you need to adjust the wheel...
#12
Quote by Judas89
Are these zr bridges only on the s series Ibanez? Don't the s series have only 22 frets or am i wrong?

They should start throwing these bridges on there rg's than i don't think i could resist buying one!!! I can change from 1/2 step down, to drop d, to full step without having to spend the whole day dicking around with the springs!

If you want an RG with that feature, look into a Prestige with the Edge Zero. It's the same idea as the ZR but with knife edges instead of ball bearings. And the ZPS3 doesn't block the trem. It just makes it so it doesn't move without you touching the whammy bar. Things like double stops and bends feel like fixed bridges and they won't detune other strings.
#13
Quote by biga29

That's not really what it does. It just basically replaces the screwdriver. Instead of turning the screws to add or take tension, you turn the wheel. The ZR does come with a removable stop bar, which can block the trem for pull back only, but it does exactly what blocking an OFR does, except you can pull back, and not push down.



If you know how to adjust a ZR, than you can adjust an OFR, all the ZR does is replace the screws with wheel to turn, but adjusting is the same concept as an OFR. The tension of the springs has to eqqual the tension of the strings. To adjust the tension on an OFR, you turn the screws; to adjust it on a ZR, you turn a wheel.

Removing the bar makes it function like a floating trem, it does´nt block it. The bar is for better stability and the wheel is for increasing or decreasing the tension.
#14
Quote by sstony
Removing the bar makes it function like a floating trem, it does´nt block it. The bar is for better stability and the wheel is for increasing or decreasing the tension.


I never said it blocked it when you removed it. I said it blocked it when you put it in. I was wrong about that too. The only time I had my stop bar in was when I bought the guitar, and then I was used to the full range of an OFR, so I though that when the bridge didn't push down as far as an OFR, the stop bar was blocking it. Basically, IMO, the stop bar is just a marketing ploy... All it does is add some tension to the strings when you push down, this will help tuning stability with string breaks, but it won't completely fix it. So yes, the ZR is a good trem for a beginner, as it's incredibly easy to set-up. But I would swap it with an Edge Zero any day. The ball bearings absolutely kill the range of the trem.

EDIT: I've realized some of that^^ is wrong too.
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Last edited by biga29 at Jul 29, 2010,