#1
Sorry if these are stupid questions, I just learnt about harmonizing yesterday.

So I know that to harmonize and play a fifth I would play the fifth note from the root in the scale. Is that with all scales/keys?

Also, can I harmonize with other notes? likes seconds and sixths? it seems that thirds and fifths are used mainly, (probably cause those are the mediant and dominant)
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Last edited by Slapp62 at Jul 27, 2010,
#2
everything will sound cool but 7ths and 2nds cause they are just half or full steps off
#3
Yes. You can harmonize with any interval in the scale.

Lets take the C major scale: C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

Say you want to harmonize the second degree, E, with a third. In this case, the third of E is G. Or you want to harmonize the fifth degree, G, with a fifth. Then you would use a D.

Hope that helps.
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#4
Generally major scales sound better when harmonized with the 4ths or 5ths, where as minor scales will sound better harmonized on 3rds.
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#5
Yes you can. For example, seconds are used in sus2 and add9 chords, and sixths are used in sixth and diminished seventh chords.
#6
Quote by Slapp62
Sorry if these are stupid questions, I just learnt about harmonizing yesterday.

So I know that to harmonize and play a fifth I would play the fifth note from the root in the scale. Is that with all scales/keys?

Also, can I harmonize with other notes? likes seconds and sixths? it seems that thirds and fifths are used mainly, (probably cause those are the mediant and dominant)


It's also a common voice leading practice--which is how I was taught harmony--to avoid back-to-back parallel perfect 4ths/5ths/and octaves because you'll get a "chinese" type sound (sorry can't really describe it better then that).

In order to avoid the parallel perfects dilemma I've always used major/minor 3rds or major/minor 6ths...

You should use inverted chords in order to guarantee smooth transitions between chords, and I always try to keep it simple when I'm harmonizing more than 2 melody lines
#7
Thirds and fifths are generally used because they're more stable than any other interval I believe. Sixths, however, are the inversion of a third. So if you're harmonizing in sixths, you're technically harmonizing in thirds. Just depends on how you think about it.
#8
can u also harmonize with non-diatonic notes?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
Quote by Slapp62
can u also harmonize with non-diatonic notes?


Yes. But they will sound pretty dissonant.
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#10
K. Thanks for everything.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#11
Quote by rockingamer2
Yes. But they will sound pretty dissonant.


not all the time... its going to depend on the other tones you use...
dominant 7th chord has a b7

or really if you harmonize a 1 to a minor 6 its just an inverted 3rd
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#12
Quote by Angusman60
not all the time... its going to depend on the other tones you use...
dominant 7th chord has a b7

or really if you harmonize a 1 to a minor 6 its just an inverted 3rd


It's true that a Dominant 7th chord has a b7 in it, but a Dom 7th chord is typically used on the V in a major key, and that b7 note happens to fit into your scale.

G7 has the notes G, B, D, and F, all of which fit into the C Major scale, the scale that G happens to be the V of.
#13
If there's s chord progression underlying the melody that you're harmonizing, use the notes in the chord as a guide. Then you could use in some notes in between for movement in flavour. If not you can use a series of notes to imply a chord.

For example: if one guitar is playing a B harmonize it with a G (a flat 6th interval), followed by an F# (perfect 5th), to an E (4th).Here you've implied an Em chord, while using a b6th interval that has minor scale characteristics, and used a F# as movement between the G and E while harmonizing with the very consonant perfect 5th, back to the root of the chord E.
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