#1
Hey UG.
To make a long story short, i've gotta make some small simpel guitar licks to match the song: Anastacia - I'm Outta Love.
But.. For a guy who is still fairly new to the guitar, and who has never written stuff before, its actually quite a task - Believe it or not.
What kind of musical theory and or knowledge do i need to know, and how should i apporoach this task?
Do i need to find out what key the song is in? (If so, how)
Can i just keep trying to make licks within the minor pentatonic scale untill it sounds good?
Note: There's no rule in how the guitar is, as long as it doesn't sound bad. But i really dont know how to start.
Could anyone give me some advice, or maybe a small guide on how to do this?
Would be appreciated.
Thank you
#2
Just listen to the song and try to think of something in your head that you 'could' hear being played with the track, humm it out if you want or whatever really, just get those creative juices flowing. Getting them out onto the guitar is the easy part IMO.
#3
So what you're basically saying is, that its time and creativity?
Because i have a lot of ideas in my head, just can't put them to the fretboard xD
#4
You should find out what key the song is in. And then start of some basic lick you already know in that particular key and add some notes, or change some, so it turns into your lick.
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#5
How do i find out what key the song is in, isn't that complicated?

EDIT
I searched for some sheets, and i found one saying the key of the song is Db.
So which scales will sound good together with it?
Last edited by KrisHQ at Jul 28, 2010,
#6
If you want a lick to work over a specific chord, work around the chord tones of that chord. When starting out, sticking to chord tones of the underlying chord, and playing them on the strong beats can't really go wrong in terms of things sounding wrong.

Being able to transfer a melody from your head to the guitar is pretty important as well.
#7
Quote by MapOfYourHead
If you want a lick to work over a specific chord, work around the chord tones of that chord. When starting out, sticking to chord tones of the underlying chord, and playing them on the strong beats can't really go wrong in terms of things sounding wrong.


Sorry, but I gotta disagree with this...that's kind of a shortcut way to learn improv, and you don't really learn anything. The key to good improv is being able to use your ear and hands (I heard someone call it the brain-to-hand signal) to play interesting melodies. Since your song is in the key of Db, you should learn the Db major scale and once you've got that down try playing around with the scale while the song is playing
#8
Okay, I listened to the song, and I can confirm that it is in the key of C#.

Below I have included the C# major / Bb minor scale and the C# major pentatonic / Bb minor pentatonic. You'll have to decide which one you want to use, but hey, as long as it sounds good, nobody'll bite.

Natural

Pentatonic

I write songs.
YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO THEM
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#10
Quote by justaramsfan
Sorry, but I gotta disagree with this...that's kind of a shortcut way to learn improv, and you don't really learn anything. The key to good improv is being able to use your ear and hands (I heard someone call it the brain-to-hand signal) to play interesting melodies. Since your song is in the key of Db, you should learn the Db major scale and once you've got that down try playing around with the scale while the song is playing


Hence the "when starting out". In general, because a beginner won't be able to play melodies straight from their head, they should work on being able to transfer some sort of melodic curve using the underlying scale and chord tones. Over time, and with experience, this will evolve into being able to play melodies straight from their head (if a decent amount of work is put in).

I also said that learning how get a melody from your head to the guitar is important, which was basically your reply.

Don't read a post and pick out solitary things to disagree about when the post is to be taken as a whole.
Last edited by MapOfYourHead at Jul 28, 2010,
#11
If you´re just starting out and not really know the theory aspect of this whole story, then just hum your licks from your head to the song and record them! After that, transcribe the licks and learn them on guitar!
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#12
Just to be sure:
I can freely switch between any of the shown notes along the fretboard on the above show pentatonic scale, as long as it sounds good?
I'm not restricted to any certain area? I can go from the 12th freth 6th, as long as the note is in the image above (the scale)
#13
Quote by KrisHQ
Just to be sure:
I can freely switch between any of the shown notes along the fretboard on the above show pentatonic scale, as long as it sounds good?
I'm not restricted to any certain area? I can go from the 12th freth 6th, as long as the note is in the image above (the scale)


Yes that's correct.
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#14
If TS is making an attempt to learn theory that diagram is going to throw him off. It is in C# or to make it simpler Db major. In the key of C# there would be a E# and B#, not an F and C, since you don't duplicate notes (ie. there shouldn't be an C and C#, F and F#). You use scale degrees to figure out the major scale with the pattern TTSTTTS (t - tone, two frets, s - semitone, one fret), writing out each natural note once (with exception to the root if it's already sharp or flat).

So C# major, you write out C# D E F G A B C#

rearrange the notes to follow the TTSTTTS pattern

C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#

All notes are sharp, so that's why all in all most musicians would consider it to be in Db.

Db Eb F Gb Ab B C Db

Make much more sense to me. It's also much easier to figure this all out if you use the circle of fifths.
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#15
Quote by Wiegenlied
If TS is making an attempt to learn theory that diagram is going to throw him off. It is in C# or to make it simpler Db major. In the key of C# there would be a E# and B#, not an F and C, since you don't duplicate notes (ie. there shouldn't be an C and C#, F and F#). You use scale degrees to figure out the major scale with the pattern TTSTTTS (t - tone, two frets, s - semitone, one fret), writing out each natural note once (with exception to the root if it's already sharp or flat).

So C# major, you write out C# D E F G A B C#

rearrange the notes to follow the TTSTTTS pattern

C# D# E# F# G# A# B# C#

All notes are sharp, so that's why all in all most musicians would consider it to be in Db.

Db Eb F Gb Ab B C Db

Make much more sense to me. It's also much easier to figure this all out if you use the circle of fifths.

Not saying that that knowledge isn't needed, but...
Natural

Pentatonic

Just sayin'

I think of major/minor scales as the root, second, fourth, and fifth are static, and just move the 3, 6, and 7 accordingly.

I write songs.
YOU SHOULD LISTEN TO THEM
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#16
^The problem is that TuxGuitar doesn't show enharmonic notes, which is a concept that should be understood in the beginning stages of learning theory, as it is very important in understanding scale and chord construction.
#17
Not to mention reading sheet music.
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#18
Quote by MapOfYourHead
Hence the "when starting out". In general, because a beginner won't be able to play melodies straight from their head, they should work on being able to transfer some sort of melodic curve using the underlying scale and chord tones. Over time, and with experience, this will evolve into being able to play melodies straight from their head (if a decent amount of work is put in).

I also said that learning how get a melody from your head to the guitar is important, which was basically your reply.

Don't read a post and pick out solitary things to disagree about when the post is to be taken as a whole.


I didn't, I guess it was just a miscommunication...I thought you were one of those guys who consider improv to be playing with chord tones, which is just a cookie cutter method in my opinion. There are different methods to developing a good ear and I'm not familiar with your method but if it works for you I can't really argue.

One technique I've used is to sing/hum a melody while a backing track is playing and convert it to guitar on the fly, or to prehearse licks in your head without actually playing them on guitar
#19
Quote by KrisHQ
So what you're basically saying is, that its time and creativity?
Because i have a lot of ideas in my head, just can't put them to the fretboard xD
Learning music theory and practicing a lot should help this.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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