#1
hai, i was asked in school to create classical piece and just wondering if you guys could gimmie some characteristics of classical music like the scales used, expressive technqiues and stuff
#2
Just use the harmonic minor and your good to go. If you are really good you can go with melodic minor, but it is pretty tricky to write in in my experience.
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#3
Stuff from the classic period usually had crystal clear textures. So if your writing for piano don't use alot of pedal. Sonata form was popular in that period so you might want to write a piece using that form.

other stuff to use:

Functional harmony
ii7b Ic V I progressions.
Notes of harmonic and melodic decoration (especially at cadences)
Motifs
Scalar passages
Alberti bass

this is what comes to mind, i'll think of more later.
#4
Quote by griffRG7321
Stuff from the classic period usually had crystal clear textures. So if your writing for piano don't use alot of pedal. Sonata form was popular in that period so you might want to write a piece using that form.

other stuff to use:

Functional harmony
ii7b Ic V I progressions.
Notes of harmonic and melodic decoration (especially at cadences)
Motifs
Scalar passages
Alberti bass

this is what comes to mind, i'll think of more later.


hmm could you elaborate on alberti bass, scalar passages and motifs. please
#5
Quote by insanityisfreed
hmm could you elaborate on alberti bass, scalar passages and motifs. please


Alberti bass is breaking a chord into a pattern such as this:

http://wpcontent.answers.com/wikipedia/commons/b/be/Mozart_k545_opening.png

Scalar passages, are passages that are very scale like, such as in this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8SZUbF3KD8

And motifs are just a musical idea that is developed into phrases.This could be a rythmic or melodic motif.

http://smu.edu/totw/cip5.gif

Notice the same rhythm in bars 1 and 3 and similarity in bars 2 and 4.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jul 28, 2010,
#7
Quote by griffRG7321
Stuff from the classic period usually had crystal clear textures. So if your writing for piano don't use alot of pedal. Sonata form was popular in that period so you might want to write a piece using that form.

other stuff to use:

Functional harmony
ii7b Ic V I progressions.
Notes of harmonic and melodic decoration (especially at cadences)
Motifs
Scalar passages
Alberti bass

this is what comes to mind, i'll think of more later.


I've never seen this notation before, what does the 'c' mean? D:
#8
Quote by Keth
I've never seen this notation before, what does the 'c' mean? D:


2nd inversion.
#10
Another good example of a motif is in Beethoven's 5th Symphony (this clip is just the 1st movement). The original motif is the first thing you hear in the symphony, the descending phrase that everyone knows.

This rhythm and the descending pattern are repeated many times in the symphony but the pitches and intervals are changed, making the motif sound quite different. The motif is also used as the basis for expansion in many of the meldoies.
#11
Thematic development (research motives, phrases, variation styles and themes)
Sophisticated harmonies (research counterpoint, every classical composer knew it)
Research their accompaniment styles (things like the "Ooom pah", arpeggios or just a plain countermelody)
Use the appropriate orchestration styles (Hint, Walter piston has an amazing book called "orchestration" on how classical composers did this)
Use classical forms (Scherzo, Rondo, Sonata and so on)
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