#1
So basically I learnt the G minor scale all over the fretboard, and got to the point where I could solo pretty well with it.

Now today I've started trying to transpose it so I can play in any minor key. I thought it would be a lot easier than it is since you're just shifting the same "patterns" around, but it's pretty hard especially with the open strings and what not.

How long did it take you guys to get used to this? I can play the scales in any key, although it takes much longer, but I can't solo at all yet outside the key of G minor.

This is the first scale I've learnt btw.
#2
I was similar to this in E minor then shifted to A minor and expanded from there and found it pretty simple. The easiest way of doing it is to learn where only two or three of the new positions of the patterns and your braind should be able to fill the rest in around the ones you know.
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#3
You just have to run them. It took me a while to get all my scales down in different positions. Maybe set up and play them with a met. That helped my accuracy. Play first quarters then 8ths 16ths then triplets etc
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#4
You should learn where all of the notes are on the fretboard. You should be able to answer the questions "What are the notes which are on the 19th fret of the third string, the 5th fret of the second string, the 21st fret of the sixth string and 7th string of the fourth string?" without thinking more than a second. Although I'm personally not good enough to promptly answer these questions if you want to be a good improviser you should. Then you need to study the circle of fifths and memorize the sharps/flats patterns in all of the twelve keys for the minor scale. Then you can solo in any key you want and quickly transpose any scale you encounter more easily. Much easier said than done, of course, but it will be worth it in the end. Learn to read sheet music for more practice in this area.
#5
Quote by Angusman60
You just have to run them. It took me a while to get all my scales down in different positions. Maybe set up and play them with a met. That helped my accuracy. Play first quarters then 8ths 16ths then triplets etc


I'm thinking of doing like 2 runs of each scale and having 2 separate days where I cover 6 scales each day or something

like
Day 1- G,G#,A,A#,B,C

and do 2 runs up and down the fretboard for each of them.

When I get good with these maybe start improvising slowly?

Soknar, I'm working on learning all the notes on the fretboard-but it's going to take some time before it's nearly instantaneous, and this is a more immediate hill to climb.
#6
Sounds like a plan.
Good luck
2010 Gibson SG Honeyburst
I'm a musician, a composer, and a theory nut. Pleased to meet you! Check out my websites and drop me a line.

"The essence of all beautiful art, all great art, is gratitude. " ~ Freidrich Nietzche


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