#1
I play mainly blues and rock, and I am very familiar with the pentatonic/blues scale and it is the majority of my solo work. I also throw in a little Dorian mode too but this is where my talent ends.
Any ideas on how to expand my playing a little further?
#2
add major scale notes into your blues scale. you can get some good licks then, its what chuck berry did.
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Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#3
you can get some good sounds by playing the relative minor's blues scale. For instance if you are playing a Blues in E you play an E blues. This gives you the "minor sound". Try using the C# blues scale over an E Blues...It will give you a more "major sound" I use it all the time...but i stole it from bb.
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#4
If it's a sad song add some minor scale notes, if it's upbeat and happy, add some major scale notes and I think you could also thrown in a little harmonic minor notes in there (maybe?).
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#5
^^ depends on the tune...with reggae...yes and others...but my brain isn't working right now
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#6
For the harmonic minor thing it can be done at least with the chord progression for "hit the road jack" and many more.
#7
I think for that one Melodic minor would be the better option because it has most natural notes in it.
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#8
Quote by Angusman60
you can get some good sounds by playing the relative minor's blues scale. For instance if you are playing a Blues in E you play an E blues. This gives you the "minor sound". Try using the C# blues scale over an E Blues...It will give you a more "major sound" I use it all the time...but i stole it from bb.


err.. while C# minor pentatonic and E major pentatonic have the same notes, they are not the same scale, and should be looked at completely differently. Im sure you were just trying to simplify things for him though.

Learn the major scale, which yeah, is pretty boring for your type of music at first, but then start messing around with things such as the mixolydian mode and you'll be amazed. Also, people underestimate the power of chromaticism. Use passing tones, and slide into diatonic tones from non-diatonic tones, and you'll see your playing become more vocal.
#9
C# minor pentatonic is a simplification of the C# Natural minor is it not? There for if playing in the key of E major, or an E Blues. If you play a C# minor pentatonic it would sound major because it is the Aolean mode of that major scale. Basically it is like playing the major scale with a minor fingering. to put it simply.
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#10
Yes, but it returns to the fact that C# minor isn't the same thing as E major, whilst they do share the same notes. Different root and every interval above, when you're playing in "C# minor" on an E major progression, I'm sure you don't resolve your licks on a C#?
#11
I'm not implying its the same scale. I'm just saying it can be used to provide a major scale type sound with the blues scale.
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#12
Learn the major scale and incoporate it into your playing.
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#13
Stop playing scales and start playing music.

Don't get me wrong, music theory is incredibly important, but there comes a time when you need to think less about scales and more about phrasing and melody and how all that comes together within a solo.

Quote by Angusman60
you can get some good sounds by playing the relative minor's blues scale. For instance if you are playing a Blues in E you play an E blues. This gives you the "minor sound". Try using the C# blues scale over an E Blues...It will give you a more "major sound" I use it all the time...but i stole it from bb.
Playing "C# blues" over a progression in E is impossible. It would just be the E major pentatonic with an added passing tone (specifically between the 2 and 3 which is a very odd place to have a passing tone).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jul 29, 2010,
#14
Quote by Angusman60
I'm not implying its the same scale. I'm just saying it can be used to provide a major scale type sound with the blues scale.


I know what you're trying to say, I'm just being an ass
Listened to your myspace dude, sounds good man keep it up.
#15
Quote by food1010
Stop playing scales and start playing music.

Don't get me wrong, music theory is incredibly important, but there comes a time when you need to think less about scales and more about phrasing and melody and how all that comes together within a solo.

Playing "C# blues" over a progression in E is impossible. It would just be the E major pentatonic with an added passing tone (specifically between the 2 and 3 which is a very odd place to have a passing tone).


Actually, that minor third passing tone is an extremely common and awesome sounding passing done. It of course can't be stressed in a major chord progression, but when you ride it down to the major second and the root over a major progression, it almost snarls. Check it out.