#1
Two or three years back I was going through my grandparents basement when I found a couple of old pedals that belonged to my uncle. I tested them then, and all the LEDs lit up, and I could play through it with the switch turned on or off (with the exception of one of them), but otherwise, they didn't work.

I know very little about electronics, so I don't really know what's wrong, but they all smell iron/blood-ish. I opened one of them, and I can't spot anything, all the cables are soldered to something, and nothing looks damaged. The pedals I'm talking about are the following:

Boss DD-2
Boss OC-2
Boss PH-1

Any idea what might be wrong with them? I probably won't bother trying to fix any of them, unless there is something simple I can try for myself.
#2
You would have to get a signal tester and go along the signal path until you find the piece that isn't working, and then replace it.

Is it the old 80s MIJ?
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#4
I opened the DD-2, and took it apart, and surprise, it's digital and got a shitload of wires and other stuff I have no idea what is. Basically looks like a computer card. It was also pretty hard to put back together, and what was a pretty neat looking inside, now looks messy as hell.

The Phaser is PTP, hard-wired or whatever it's called, and doesn't look hard to fix if you know what you're doing, but I sincerely doubt the repair would be worth it considering that I don't know how to do it myself. Will probably give it away to someone who knows what they're doing. The same applies to the Octave.
#5
the old boss ph-1 pedals are excellent phasers. depending on how messed up it is, it might be worth paying someone to fix it. even in an un-working condition its probably still worth something. if youve got a multi-meter and some gut shots, i or someone else could try walking you through trouble shooting. not so much on the digital stuff, but ptp or analog usually isnt bad to troubleshoot.
#6
Quote by boffen
I opened the DD-2, and took it apart, and surprise, it's digital and got a shitload of wires and other stuff I have no idea what is. Basically looks like a computer card. It was also pretty hard to put back together, and what was a pretty neat looking inside, now looks messy as hell.

The Phaser is PTP, hard-wired or whatever it's called, and doesn't look hard to fix if you know what you're doing, but I sincerely doubt the repair would be worth it considering that I don't know how to do it myself. Will probably give it away to someone who knows what they're doing. The same applies to the Octave.


PTP wiring means there is no pcb, eyelet or turret board to mount components on, that is highly unusual in an old boss pedal... SOP for them is using printed circuit boards (pcb's) for their construction, and very little of it may be hand soldered.

what people normally do in this situation is sell them to someone who knows what to do with them. when we get stuff like this, we pull up the schematic, do some basic testing to try and isolate the problem ("does the light turn on", "does the effect engage", etc) and most the time it is a switch or jack that is the problem. if you know what you are looking for you can usually troubleshoot these with quite minimum effort, but if you don't know what you're doing then it is quite pointless. we either end up fixing the pedal, or harvesting parts. the early MIJ boss pedals have many 'desirable' germanium diodes and chase opamps.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#7
Well, nothing looks broken about it. No oxidation, no broken anything. Just the smell of iron/blood. As previously mentioned, I know very little about electronics. But, I need to get a soldering iron to fix my strat, so maybe I should take this opportunity to learn something about this? I don't want to **** it up though, so I'd rather pay someone if it's actually good.
#8
Quote by gumbilicious
PTP wiring means there is no pcb, eyelet or turret board to mount components on, that is highly unusual in an old boss pedal... SOP for them is using printed circuit boards (pcb's) for their construction, and very little of it may be hand soldered.

what people normally do in this situation is sell them to someone who knows what to do with them. when we get stuff like this, we pull up the schematic, do some basic testing to try and isolate the problem ("does the light turn on", "does the effect engage", etc) and most the time it is a switch or jack that is the problem. if you know what you are looking for you can usually troubleshoot these with quite minimum effort, but if you don't know what you're doing then it is quite pointless. we either end up fixing the pedal, or harvesting parts. the early MIJ boss pedals have many 'desirable' germanium diodes and chase opamps.


Ok, one side of the board is green, and the other is brownish, and looks like the stuff I see people post pics of in DIY amp/pedal threads, so I just assumed that was what it was. I will probably ask some DIY-people if they could fix it for cheap, or sell it to them if fixing it is too expensive.
#9
sounds like PCB

local is they way to go on that, so that way you don't have to pay shipping and handling costs as well. if you can find a local shop guy, he'll probably charge you an hour or 2 and parts (depending on the complexity of the problem) and this usually makes it not cost effective as 40 or 50 bucks is roughly what i have been seeing for an hour of shop time. if you know DIYer, then that is really your best bet, hopefully he will be good and also explain what he is doing.

me and my buddy pick up many messed up pedals online from people trying to mod them and not knowing what they are doing. if you want to mess around with a solder iron then take special care to NOT put the soldering iron on the board and burn the board (keep the iron on the component or joint to keep from damaging the board); also, try not mess up the 'track' on the pcb. it is also good practice to not gob a whole bunch of solder onto the joing, try to keep solder joints small and clean
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#10
btw:

ptp:



pcb (regardless of 'digital' or 'analog'):

digital wii controller

analog voltage control unit

turret board(think vintage marshall and fender):


eyelets look very similar to turret boards, but they have eyelets in them.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#11
I've decided that I won't do it myself, as I've never touched a soldering iron before, but I do know some people. My former neighbor does this kind of stuff, so I'll check with him.

I think something is really wrong with these pedals though, because all of them worked before my uncle put them in my grandparents basement, and all of them have been in a box in a cold basement for several years. Due to the iron/blood smell, I think something is rusty, but I can't spot any.
#12
If you say none of them will work(bypass), then It looks like it could be the switches. Something like your grand-father tried to tweak them or something. Something with the switches.

I wouldn't stop because of my soldering-skills. Understanding electronics is much more vital then soldering, if you ask me. For most people, soldering takes a few hours to get used to(if not less). Understanding audio and electronics takes much longer.
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#13
Mmm...DD-2 and PH-1

Unfortunately I can't help you with the problems, but you should definitely find someone to look at those two in particular.
Board:
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