#1
Sorry if this is the wrong forum...

Anyway, my question. What are the factors the attribute to a good, solid lead tone? I'm not talking about different tastes, or experimental tones like Radiohead or Jack White. I'm talking about the eq, the amount of gain, how to stand out in the mix, amount of compression, difference between a lead and a rythm tone, etc. Any (helpful) advice is welcome.
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#2
thats all subjective in fact there are many arguments on this site about who has a good/bad lead tone
#3
Quote by supersac
thats all subjective in fact there are many arguments on this site about who has a good/bad lead tone

+1
#4
Depends on the style, and you.
You should really decide which tones are good for you. You know your gear better than we do (or at least, you should).
superman is killing himself tonight
#5
I agree with what was said above...but i think a good lead tone for what i like to play (classic rock, hard rock, early heavy metal, 80's metal, southern rock etc....has a good amount of gain to get it to stand out and have good sustain, but not too much where it becomes muddy..reverb is a must for me...and then the occasional delay and or chorus etc.

for rhythm i like a bit less distortion, and generally no effects minus a bit of reverb and sometimes chorus depending on the tone i'm going for..

eq...i like mids almost maxed, like 8.5/0, treble like 8/10 and bass like 6/10, and presence generally around 5

but that's just me, it's all personal taste, and also depends on the style of music being played
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#6
does compression help when you're going for a solo?

and my style is pretty much all styles of rock. my top bands are Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, and Pink Floyd, so there's an idea of my tone tastes.

but to me, a rythm tone always seems more loose, per say. and when the guitarist goes to lead, the tone seems more tightened and controled
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#7
Quote by owentheobiwan
does compression help when you're going for a solo?

and my style is pretty much all styles of rock. my top bands are Led Zeppelin, the Beatles, and Pink Floyd, so there's an idea of my tone tastes.

but to me, a rythm tone always seems more loose, per say. and when the guitarist goes to lead, the tone seems more tightened and controled


sometimes..i dont' use compression all that much unless i'm using it on the clean channel for a spanky country type tone...

ya i agree with the lead being tighter and the rythm more loose, that's how i like it
http://www.youtube.com/user/heavymetal1110
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Epiphone Korina explorer, Fender MIM Strat, Ibanez GSA60, Ibanez AEG25
The amp: Bugera 1990
Pedals: Ibanez Tubescreamer,wylde od, wylde wah, Tc electronic g major,
#8
I try to avoid compression as much as I can. It essentially disables all dynamic ability.
But some people use it a whole lot, so, it's really subjective (as (almost) all things are).
superman is killing himself tonight
#9
Yngwie Malmsteen and Steve Vai.


End of discussion.


Nah, they have it right though, in my mind anyway. Good ammout of gain but not crunchy like a rhythm tone, more of a singing overdrive sound. Boost the mids, cut the bottom and bring the highs up a bit. Some people like some compression to make it a little "tighter" and add a bit of sustain, but really every detail of what makes a "good" or "bad" lead tone is subjective. I would say listen to Rusty Cooley if you want a "bad" lead tone, but again thats just me.
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#10
well alrighty then! this was helpful. thank you to those who helped
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#11
soldano slo.


nothing else will do
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#12
The only thing I think is important regardless of genre/playing style is full mids. That is how you really cut through.
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#13
Personally, I play metal, and a bit of lower gain things, such as softer buckethead and opeth.
For a metal lead tone, I use gain:7-10, treb: 6, mid: 5-6, bass: 8, contour: 7
For a nice warm kinda cleanish tone I use; gain:4-5, treb: 7-8, mid: 4, bass: 7-8, contour: 5

I rarely use these eq's, and preffer the extremes eg. gain: 10, treb: 10, mid: 0, bass: 10.
or, treb: 5, mid: 7, bass: 9.
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#14
Quote by owentheobiwan
Sorry if this is the wrong forum...

Anyway, my question. What are the factors the attribute to a good, solid lead tone? I'm not talking about different tastes, or experimental tones like Radiohead or Jack White. I'm talking about the eq, the amount of gain, how to stand out in the mix, amount of compression, difference between a lead and a rythm tone, etc. Any (helpful) advice is welcome.

It is entirely subjective no matter about different tastes.

All you need in terms of a solo tone as a general rule of thumb is a boost in the mid-range, so your guitar's fundamental frequencies stand out and people hear the notes clearly, and the sound fills out the gap where the vocals would be.

I find that, even though haters gonna hate, for rhythm playing you may want to cut back on the mids just a little - you don't normally want the rhythm part to be punching through the midrange frequencies too much. By "scooping", i don't mean "10/0/10" EQ because that's just a dumbass way to set up an amp, but on a "generic amp EQ" sort of scale, something like "7/5/6" (but don't go setting your amp EQ to exactly that - you gotta use your ears when you EQ - ignore the numbers)

As far as gain, compression etc will go that depends on your own taste really, of course there are clichés for particular styles of music like "gain on 10 if you want to play teh br00talz face melting shredz0rz" but let's not go there - it prevents people from thinking outside the box.

Quote by MrFlibble
The only thing I think is important regardless of genre/playing style is full mids. That is how you really cut through.

Are you joking? Or just exaggerating because that's what needs to be done sometimes. I wouldn't have expected you to come up with something like that.

edit: Also - don't feed the above spambot.
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Last edited by Blompcube at Jul 29, 2010,
#15
Quote by Blompcube

Are you joking? Or just exaggerating because that's what needs to be done sometimes. I wouldn't have expected you to come up with something like that.
Eh? I'm just saying pretty much the same thing you just did. You won't cut through the mix if you've scooped your mids to the beyond.
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#16
Quote by MrFlibble
Eh? I'm just saying pretty much the same thing you just did. You won't cut through the mix if you've scooped your mids to the beyond.

Ah right, i just misinterpreted it I read it as "keep your mids at 10 all the time".
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.