#1
So I'm building my new studio and I'm working on finding the right PC. My budget is about $700. I can do $800 if I'm lucky. My interface is a Focusrite Saffire Pro 40. My DAWs are Reaper (main) and Ableton.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883147095

My friend who builds PCs has recommended me this one. I plan on replacing the processor with an Intel i7. What do you guys think as far as running ONLY audio goes? It seems pretty well equipped otherwise.

Could I do better? Not in a rush and want to make the perfect choice.
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
#2
From another thread....

These days, any off-the-shelf system will do just fine. We recorded our album on a Celeron 1.7ghz machine with 512MB RAM. You almost can't even give away a computer with those specs these days. Each song on our album was up to 36 tracks of 24-bit audio.

We just bought at Costco an Acer Aspire. It is 2.8Ghz (single core), 4GB RAM, 1TB HD, and came with Win7, a multi-DVD burner and a 20" LCD monitor... for $599. It beats the living crap out of my other system.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
axemanchris, well it depends if he's just tracking and mixing recorded work, or if his music is very processor heavy, for example, an electronic project with upwards of 10 VSTi in one song. (Yes, you can always render each instrument's track once it's complete, but it makes it a hassle to go back and edit things later).

Axemanchris does have a point though, that it sill doesn't take much special to work with music. Even my desktop with a 3.0ghz single core and 1.5gb RAM can run 3 very processor-heavy VSTi or guitar amp simulators along with other more basic effects (compressors, etc), at once with 0 latency. An i7 and 8gb of RAM? That thing will do whatever you want and more.
#4
To be able to access all that RAM under Windows 7 you need a DAW that runs 64 bit and I'm not sure Reaper does that. Anyway, processor speed is far less important than RAM in most recording/mixing situations. Just about any half-assed computer on sale anywhere these days will give you 2GHz and 4Gb RAM which is plenty for most situations. As long as you make some performance-related adjustments to optimize it for only running audio recording/mixing you can find a machine for less than your budget. I currently run 2Gb RAM and 2.1GHz and I do fine despite loading up on virtual instruments and effects.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

- Huey Lewis & the News
#5
I run maybe 6 or 7 Amp sims, impulse vsts and Superior Drummer 2 with no problems at all. My computer is an Acer Aspire M1640, 2.6ghz dual core, 2 gigs RAM and I use it for games, photoshop and even UG
#6
ebon00, reaper does have a 64 bit version.

fastlane, thats very similar to what i am running (i think i have the previous version) and it is great. i have not run into any issues, and i dont exactly take it light on the processing (on some stuff). with a quad core and 8 gigs of ram, i dont think you will run into many, if any, limitations.
#7
Looks like a nice HP for the price. Just be aware that you'll need to swap the motherboard to get an Intel processor in there and the i7 is a great processsor......but TBH, you could easily get by with an i5.
I still run my gear on an AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 6000+ at 3.10GHz and it does just about everything I can toss at it just fine.

HP makes some good hardware but loads their systems up with crapware so you'll want to uninstall all that trial stuff from the start.
If you want to run anti virus software, (a must if you're connecting to the net), I suggest ESET NOD32 which is not free, or Microsoft's Security Essentials, (free and by far the best free AV program out there today IMO)

Desktop PC are all the same. The parts all come from different sources and the only thing you really have to pick is the specs such as HDD space, memory, processor type/speed, and OS version.
If you have 4+ GB of memory, go with a 64bit OS but also be aware that some hardware drivers may give you issues on a 64bit OS.
Last edited by moody07747 at Jul 29, 2010,
#8
Quote by morrock
axemanchris, well it depends if he's just tracking and mixing recorded work, or if his music is very processor heavy, for example, an electronic project with upwards of 10 VSTi in one song. (Yes, you can always render each instrument's track once it's complete, but it makes it a hassle to go back and edit things later).


True enough.

In *very* general terms:

HDD speed = # of tracks you can record/play back simultaneously
CPU speed = # of effects and VSTi's you can run
RAM = # of samples you can use simultaneously

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Depends on what you want to use as a DAW. Some are more PC friendly than others.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.