#1
1. What's the best way to go about scales? I know the intervals and have good theory knowledge but I need help in learning them by heart. Should I learn 7 patterns or 3-4? How have you memorized them?

2. Judge my diminished arpeggio. It's based off of melodic minor with a #2nd. The intervals sound exotic. I even added the tritone. Btw it's in Drop D

e-------------2-3
b-----------4-----4
g---------5---------5
d-------4-------------4
a-----3-----------------3
d---2---------------------5or3 then repeat
#2
Quote by cj_lespaul
1. What's the best way to go about scales? I know the intervals and have good theory knowledge but I need help in learning them by heart. Should I learn 7 patterns or 3-4? How have you memorized them?
How about 0? Seriously, you shouldn't learn scales by patterns. I'm not saying patterns are bad, but I think there are better ways to "learn" scales from the start. Once you learn how to construct them, you will have a firm understanding of them, plus the patterns will just be automatic to you.

That said, that should be exactly how you learn them: You said you know the intervals, then you know the scales. Making them more automatic just takes practice and application of the scales.

Quote by cj_lespaul
2. Judge my diminished arpeggio. It's based off of melodic minor with a #2nd. The intervals sound exotic. I even added the tritone. Btw it's in Drop D

e-------------2-3
b-----------4-----4
g---------5---------5
d-------4-------------4
a-----3-----------------3
d---2---------------------5or3 then repeat
That's based off of the harmonic minor. It's also not diminished and it uses a b2 instead of a #2 (If you're using that F in there, that is). Other than that, I'm not sure what you're asking.
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#3
i usully just play whit the scale when i learn a new one eventually it sticks
not sure what you want us to say about the arpeggio doesnt mean anythng out of context
#4
I just wanted to share the arpeggio. I meant F# btw. I was writing songs in F#m. But thanks, I'm getting at an intermediate level and I've been writing scales on paper but I want to learn them by memory
#5
Yeah, I think you should learn them by the notes if possible. That way you learn the fretboard and everything as well.

Guitar was my first instrument and like a typical guitarist, I just learned the patterns. Well it certainly works but I couldn't tell you which note is which once you get to the mid-upper strings without a second to think. Recently we just got a piano and since I really know my keys and scales, it's been much easier to play them instead of memorizing which black keys to hit. I'm able to see which notes to hit and see music as whole instead of as specific 'right' notes to play. now which makes for more fluent playing and better understanding of the instrument.

tl;dr:
I suggest learning them as notes first. After that, you'll know the patterns and be much more fluent with your instrument.

Sorry if this isn't coherent, my brain is in energy saving mode
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Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jul 28, 2010,
#6
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Yeah, I think you should learn them by the notes if possible. That way you learn the fretboard and everything as well.

Guitar was my first instrument and like a typical guitarist, I just learned the patterns. Well it certainly works but I couldn't tell you which note is which once you get to the mid-upper strings without a second to think. Recently we just got a piano and since I really know my keys and scales, it's been much easier to play them instead of memorizing which black keys to hit. I'm able to see which notes to hit and see music as whole instead of as specific 'right' notes to play. now which makes for more fluent playing and better understanding of the instrument.

tl;dr:
I suggest learning them as notes first. After that, you'll know the patterns and be much more fluent with your instrument.

Sorry if this isn't coherent, my brain is in energy saving mode
Th
The hardest thing for me is going to be learning the notes.. But I've been doing it note by note and since I know all my octaves and unisons on adjacent strings I've been slowly learning. Thanks a lot man
#7
I'm not condemning learning note names, but unless you're playing with an ensemble that uses standard notation (which, lets face it, most people here aren't), it's not top priority. It's good to know where a handful of E's are on the fretboard when you're playing in E, true, but I think a more important aspect of it is learning the intervals of the scale. Know where the 3rds, 5ths, 7ths are in your patterns, if someone asks you to throw down a lead in the mixolydian mode, know how to configure your major scale instantly without having to sit and write yourself out a bunch of patterns. We're lucky on guitar as one "pattern" of notes applies to every key, as all notes are equally spaced on the fretboard, allowing us to move patterns up and down as we see fit. It's tougher on instruments like the keyboard, where notes are NOT are equally spaced, and you must learn a new finger movement for every scale of every key!
#8
An interval is the space between two notes - you can't learn them without first knowing your frame of reference which is the notes themselves.

I've seen this "learn intervals, not notes" crap before and it's utter bullshit - you can't learn intervals until you know notes...it's like saying "learn words, not letters".
Actually called Mark!

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#9
I disagree, I can easily not know any note on the fretboard but be able to judge the spaces between them. Players who play in tunings such as A standard do it all the time.