#1
In the 2008 edition of the RR5 I'm possibly going to be buying soon, there is a JB in both the bridge and neck, which confused me because I thought the JB was pretty much exclusively a bridge pickup.

Would the JB pickup even sound any different in the neck position? Have any of you tried this? Would the Jazz in the neck be an overall better choice (2009 editions and newer)?

Also, according to model specifications I've seen, the 2008 model of the RR5 says the two JB pickups are TB-4's. I don't understand why, because I read that TB-4's are for trem-bridged guitars, whereas the RR5 is a hardtail.
#2
firstly, "trem bridged guitar pickups" just mean a few millimeters wider. if the hard tail is wider built, or if they simply dont care, they can put in whatever they want. it doesn't make much of a difference really. if the pickup is wider, who cares. no difference really.

secondly, there will be a sound difference. in the neck, it will sound naturally deeper and have a little bit more output/gain because of the position (strings vibrate more further down toward the center of the neck).

thirdly, didnt you ask this in the other thread you have?
#3
Alright thanks. What would your opinion be of the JB in the neck? Jazz in the neck seems to be much more common.

And yeah, I did ask it in the other thread, but to be honest in quite the time constraint and need to make some quick decisions here, so sorry if I seem like a spammer. I'm just trying to find out as much as I can before buying things!
#4
Quote by fixationdarknes
Alright thanks. What would your opinion be of the JB in the neck? Jazz in the neck seems to be much more common.



Sometimes people like slapping a high output bridge pickup in the neck position. Its not uncommon. Lots of metal players do it. Using a hotter pickup in the neck position will still give you a nice smooth fat tone, just gives you more output to drive the amp with.
#5
i cant actually recall if i've ever played a guitar with the jb in the neck. i've played several RR models, but i just cant remember man... i would imagine its a very similar sound to the bridge. just usually what happens is the bass gets accentuated a little more, while the highs drop a little. it just gets a little more rounded off. bridge pickups have a little more bite and snarl to them (more highs, less low end) just from placement of it.

if its like the other guitars i've played where two pickups were the same, it'll just be a more rounded off sound. more "natural" sounding, and less exaggerated highs. should be good for lead tones!
#6
You may or may not like the band but Zacky V from Avenged Sevenfold uses a JB in both positions on his guitars.
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#7
I have a Epi G-400 with two Dirty Fingers in it. The neck and bridge sound very different even though they're the same pickup. Paul Gilbert has used 2 Tone Zones and 2 Super Distortions in the past. There are people who use 2 EMG-81s or 2 EMG-85s. Don't worry about having two of the same pickups, they'll still sound very different. Now whether you want 2 JB's is a different question. Look at the qualities of a JB and see if you want that in a neck pickup. I don't think it would be bad but a lot of people just prefer more "reserved" pickups in the neck.
#8
Hm... thanks guys for the feedback.

Does it make a difference if I don't really plan on playing with clean settings very often if at all? I figure, like User_Name336 suggests, that I'd be using the JB Neck mainly for some leads (still distorted though).

Also, for those who have the Jazz in their neck, is this used mainly for cleans or is it meant to work well with distorted (leads) as well?

Thanks.
#9
Quote by fixationdarknes
Hm... thanks guys for the feedback.

Does it make a difference if I don't really plan on playing with clean settings very often if at all? I figure, like User_Name336 suggests, that I'd be using the JB Neck mainly for some leads (still distorted though).
Depends how you get your distorted tones. If you use a lot of preamp gain, a boost pedal or a distortion pedal then your pickup's output means squat - you might as well go for lower output pickups to get the best response and clarity. If however you go a little easier on the gain or only use pedals for a very light boost then your pickups' output means much more. So it really depends on your amp. Most modern players though don't really use their guitar's volume controls to control their gain, so the pickups' output really doesn't matter to them. It's kind of funny how so many people are obsessed with having high-output pickups and yet they don't use them in a way which actually gets any use out of the output.

Also, for those who have the Jazz in their neck, is this used mainly for cleans or is it meant to work well with distorted (leads) as well?
In my experience it is used more for distorted tones than for clean tones. The very first time I ever heard of the Jazz pickup was Emppu Vuorinen, a fantastic Finnish guitarist who plays lead guitar for a variety of heavy metal bands, most notably the gothic metal band Nightwish. Most of his solos are played using the neck pickup, which happens to be an SD Jazz model with no tone control. Reading up on his gear was the first time I had heard of the Jazz model and since then I can't think of a single time I've heard of people using it in the neck position for clean tones, but I've lost count of how many people use it for distorted neck lead tones. I myself have one in the neck position of one of my guitars and I never use it clean.
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#10
Thanks. If I end up buying a good amp and forgoing the necessity of an expensive pedal, what pickups would be the best in an alder instrument like an RR5... SH-14? SH-11? SH-5? What about for neck?

And if I go the pedal route, what are good examples of lower output pickups that would work well? SH-1? Could the Jazz even work well in the bridge at this point?
#11
Isn't alder a pretty bright wood?

I think you should stay away from the SH-5, the Custom. IIRC, that's brighter than the JB. I think the SH-11 is a bit more smooth, but is still pretty bright.

You could still put the Jazz in the neck. Lots of people use the SH-5/Jazz and the SH-11/Jazz. My guitar came stock with JB/'59. I don't really like the '59. It's too organic and full for my playing style. I would much prefer a Jazz, but I think I might have a hard time buying a nickel covered one...
#12
Hm alright, I'll keep that in mind. Thanks.

I'm still a bit worried about JB/JB configuration though which may end up being in the guitar I buy. I suppose I could always sell one of the JB's for a Jazz or 59?
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Jul 29, 2010,
#13
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Isn't alder a pretty bright wood?
Alder is usually considered to be the most balanced wood.

I think you should stay away from the SH-5, the Custom. IIRC, that's brighter than the JB. I think the SH-11 is a bit more smooth, but is still pretty bright.
The Custom isn't brighter than the JB, but it does have better treble detail - the Custom has a little more treble and a little less upper-mid while the JB has a massive upper-mid spike and not as much treble. Clean, the JB will seem smoother, but this translates as high-end mud once you add in any gain.
The Custom 5 is, to me, the better made, better designed, upgrade of the JB. It's got clearer bass and better high-end clarity without getting shrill when clean like the Custom can.
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