#1
I've been playing guitar for roughly two years. I've pretty much just been learning a lot of songs by modern metal bands or metalcore bands. Now I'm writing my own stuff and when it comes to solo's I've just been creating them and improvising by ear. I'm decent at improv, but so far I haven't had any theory backing it. I know what sounds good to me, and I know how to play (some) of what I'm looking for, but I don't know what I'm playing... if that makes sense. It's taken me awhile (dumb for not doing it two years ago -_-') but now I'm trying to incorporate scales and theory into my playing. So I actually know what I'm doing. I was hoping that some of you could help me out. What scales are good for metal? I know that all scales can be applied to all genres of music. The bands I like most atm are (dont flame me >_> lol) Bullet for My Valentine, Atreyu, August Burns Red, All That Remains and such. If anyone could point out some of the scales that they're using that'd be great. I have decent theory knowledge, (I've been playing piano for around 9 years) but if someone could tell me what I 'should' be using to get the sound I'm after that'd be awesome. Sorry if I'm in the wrong section of the forums or if there are thousands of posts like mine. I'm new to these forums :x lol. Thanks tons for any help
#2
1) Learn about intervals.
2) Learn the major scale (and maybe the natural minor scale).
3) Apply this knowledge of intervals/the major scale to find out what scales they use (hint, they're probably just major/minor).

Seriously, once you have a firm grasp of intervals, scales are pretty much automatic. You may not have the muscle memory, but learning a scale and coming up with the positions will be ridiculously easy.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by food1010
1) Learn about intervals.
2) Learn the major scale (and maybe the natural minor scale).
3) Apply this knowledge of intervals/the major scale to find out what scales they use (hint, they're probably just major/minor).

Seriously, once you have a firm grasp of intervals, scales are pretty much automatic. You may not have the muscle memory, but learning a scale and coming up with the positions will be ridiculously easy.

This is pretty much what I would say.

Oh and I would drop the term "scale improvisation." It kind of implies that you have to follow a scale in order to improvise. Kind of redundant I suppose.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
Last edited by hockeyplayer168 at Jul 29, 2010,
#4
Yeah. I didn't like typing 'scale improvisation'. lol. Well thanks guys for your help. I'll get right on that