#1
So this questions been in my mind and i like to see what others thought on this. when playing a solo, what do you feel makes it sound the way it does, the notes you play or the chords behind it. i always felt like the chords make the solo, though the notes you play are important too i guess.

i really started thinking this way after hearing Joe Bonamassa play Django on Live from nowhere in Particular. in the beginning he plays a simple lick. he does it twice but for each time the keyboard plays a different chord, making it sound completely different.

so all i come to you to ask, whats more important in making the sound of your solo, the notes you play or the chords you choose to back them?
#2
The emotion you put into it. Whatever you have to change to get the feel you want the song to get across.
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#3
Technically speaking the chord determines the notes that can be played such as scales and modes and all that, however the notes you use determine the style you play. The person above me has a good point playing the notes the way you do will make the solo but without the chords the solo might just become a slur of randomness.

so it's really a back and forth with a conclusion that both are equally important it's up to you to decide which to start with.
#4
Quote by Jasonbts
The emotion you put into it. Whatever you have to change to get the feel you want the song to get across.

Totally agree, the notes and the chords don't matter nearly as much as the emotion behind them, and how they are played. I would define the most important part of a solo as the style it is played in (how the notes are played, emotion, phrasing, and all that.)

Out of the two choices you gave, I would say that both the notes and the chords are both very important, but you can't really make a solo out of chords (easily) so I would have to go with the notes. Much easier to play a solo without chords than without individual notes.
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#5
the relationship between the chords and the notes..

That can bring depth and interesting sounds to your solo. My goal with a solo is to do something that the ear does not expect.

I often find my self listening to a solo that I have never heard and kinda predicting what will come next cause so many people do cliche things in their solos.

A way I see guitarist get out of that is by changing the chords behind them.

Players who can use mode freely are the greats.

Also when it comes to "feeling" no one can tell what the hell YOU are "feeling" when YOU are playing a solo so that is Bull sh*t..
Last edited by Axim Bassist at Jul 29, 2010,
#6
Quote by Axim Bassist
Also when it comes to "feeling" no one can tell what the hell YOU are "feeling" when YOU are playing a solo so that is Bull sh*t..


Nobody's trying to tell him what he should be feeling when he's soloing, they're just saying that the feel of the solo is what gives it it's style and sound.

I agree with the rest of your post though, that's all very important as well.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#7
Quote by Jasonbts
The emotion you put into it. Whatever you have to change to get the feel you want the song to get across.




This is so cliche and unhelpful.

Both matter. Clearly the melody really makes the solo (what do you whistle, the melody or the harmony?), but that's not to say that the harmony doesn't matter. "Bad" harmony won't sink the ship, but it will certain rock it and get the listeners seasick (broke the fourth wall in that metaphor).

Here's what normally happens with me. If I already have a harmony in place, I run with it. If it turns out that the melody I'm creating would sound better if the harmony was different, its wish is my command (exactly what the quoted individual said after he pooped those cliches). If I don't have a set harmony in place, I'll try to let my imagination run wild and then get the harmony in later. Sometimes that's hard so I'll come up with a placeholder melody to help jog some ideas.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
Quote by sites.nick
Nobody's trying to tell him what he should be feeling when he's soloing, they're just saying that the feel of the solo is what gives it it's style and sound.

I agree with the rest of your post though, that's all very important as well.


and I'm not saying they are.

I'm saying that what you are feeling as in emotion does not dictate what a person plays and listeners can not tell the difference with out a guess.

and therefore does not make something great...
#9
Quote by Axim Bassist
the relationship between the chords and the notes..

That can bring depth and interesting sounds to your solo. My goal with a solo is to do something that the ear does not expect.

I often find my self listening to a solo that I have never heard and kinda predicting what will come next cause so many people do cliche things in their solos.

A way I see guitarist get out of that is by changing the chords behind them.

Players who can use mode freely are the greats.

Also when it comes to "feeling" no one can tell what the hell YOU are "feeling" when YOU are playing a solo so that is Bull sh*t..


Best answer so far, especially the last part. A solo will be interesting if it defies expectations, as will and part of music. I like how someone said that the notes and the chords don't matter at all to make the solo sound good. If you want a solo to sound good, study the chord progression, then figure out ways you can link the chords together.
#10
scale is most important i guess. Both chords and solo r important . They just need to be well arranged in a scale.
#11
They are equally as important. Besides, choice of notes and chords aren't even very high on the scale (no pun intended) of what should constitute a kick-ass solo.

1) Melody - Play what people will remember FOREVER
2) Passion - Play EVERY note as though it were your last.... well, without being cheesy
3) Groove - most overlooked aspect in all of guitar soloing. Listen to Warren Haynes or SRV for a good representation of groove in soloing.

Granted, even though chord choice and note choice aren't #1 on the list, they ARE important. But if I had to choose something more important, it would be note choice. And if you are improvising, the chords should already be there.
#12
Quote by NEmafia
So this questions been in my mind and i like to see what others thought on this. when playing a solo, what do you feel makes it sound the way it does, the notes you play or the chords behind it. i always felt like the chords make the solo, though the notes you play are important too i guess.

i really started thinking this way after hearing Joe Bonamassa play Django on Live from nowhere in Particular. in the beginning he plays a simple lick. he does it twice but for each time the keyboard plays a different chord, making it sound completely different.

so all i come to you to ask, whats more important in making the sound of your solo, the notes you play or the chords you choose to back them?

imo, the chords behind it are more important as they determine what you can play more or less. different chords and progressions give you more or less options to play over them.
#13
The context [so what notes over the chord] and just as important RHYTHM !
#14
Quote by NEmafia
So this questions been in my mind and i like to see what others thought on this. when playing a solo, what do you feel makes it sound the way it does, the notes you play or the chords behind it. i always felt like the chords make the solo, though the notes you play are important too i guess.

i really started thinking this way after hearing Joe Bonamassa play Django on Live from nowhere in Particular. in the beginning he plays a simple lick. he does it twice but for each time the keyboard plays a different chord, making it sound completely different.

so all i come to you to ask, whats more important in making the sound of your solo, the notes you play or the chords you choose to back them?



let me ask you this..... what benefit is gained by seeing 1 as more important than the other, when its clear that both are necessary?


Quote by Jasonbts
The emotion you put into it.



I agree that the expression coming from the artist is an important defining factor.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 30, 2010,
#15
Quote by GuitarMunky
let me ask you this..... what benefit is gained by seeing 1 as more important than the other, when its clear that both are necessary?


Bombshell dropped. No more discussion necessary. Everyone evacuate this thread.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#16
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Bombshell dropped. No more discussion necessary. Everyone evacuate this thread.

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Oh yeah.

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A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#18
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Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.