#1
Hey friends!

So, I work for a junk removal company, and the other day my boss was doing a job throwing out a Traynor YBA-1 Bass Master head and Cabinet.

He knew I was very into guitar and kept the head (The cabinet was too large to save, and had to be put in the garbage bin). Needless to say, he gave it to me.

I tried out the head into the speakers of my Crate V33-212. It sounds light years better than the Crate.

But, alas... there are some issues.

-Standby toggle switch is really busted
-Could use a re-tubing (Not a problem)
-I want an effects loop
-pretty buzzy/strange noises

Though, all things aside, the amp is terrific sounding!

I'm planning on taking it to a tech, but to fix/attend to my issues with the amp... How much should I expect to pay?

I'm comfortable with learning how to do these myself, but have no immediate experience (though, I'm alright at soldering connections, and have done guitar mods before).

Which things should I take the time to do myself?
Is modding in an FX loop difficult?


Thanks friends,

-Josh
#2
That's awesome! Great little amps.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#3
pics or its a broken MG!
2012 Gibson Les Paul Custom Classic
2001 Schecter C-1 Classic
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Vox AC15CC1 w/ Eminence Tonkerlite
Assorted Pedals!

All for sale!

Call me Matt!
#4
Quote by diceksox1809
pics or its a broken MG!

A) This comment is a win

B) YOu're incredibly lucky and happy sort of NGD
#5
1.) Switches can be replaced. If you are capable you should be able to buy a matching one and resolder the lead connections.

2.) Yeah, get it retubed. I recommend dougstubes.com and spray some contact cleaner in thar.

3.) Adding an FX loop could be a pretty big task because you have to rewire into the amp circuit and could get tricky. I've never done that nor am I an amp tech. Why do you need a Loop so bad?

4.) Buzz could be coming from lots of things. Preamp tube, shotty solder joint, grounding, etc. Try playing amp while it is distanced from cab by long cable and see what happens.

$.) Expect to pay $40 - $80 per hour depending on where you are and where you go. Also depends on what all needs to be done. Maybe ask for a free estimate. Find out if your amp needs to be biased and what thresholds to look for. Caps may need a replacement too.


I can't believe I typed all of that


Anyway Congrats

pics?
#7
what these guys said, and congrats.

lucky s.o.b.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#8
Quote by roshjosh

But, alas... there are some issues.

-Standby toggle switch is really busted
-Could use a re-tubing (Not a problem)
-I want an effects loop
-pretty buzzy/strange noises

Though, all things aside, the amp is terrific sounding!

I'm planning on taking it to a tech, but to fix/attend to my issues with the amp... How much should I expect to pay?

I'm comfortable with learning how to do these myself, but have no immediate experience (though, I'm alright at soldering connections, and have done guitar mods before).

Which things should I take the time to do myself?
Is modding in an FX loop difficult?


Thanks friends,

-Josh

You lucky bastard, that's an amazing find. I play a YBA-4 which is essentially the same as the YBA-1, just in a 1x15" combo. It's a great amp and I wouldn't bother messing with the original circuit (I've also played YBA-1s and felt the same way).

The toggle switch will be easy and cheap to replace. A retube will also be super easy since you don't even really have to bias these amps (you could, but it's not necessary). I don't know what you mean exactly by there being buzzy and strange noises, but a good tech should be able to give it a checkup with no problems since they're wired PTP and are easy to work with. I personally wouldn't bother with an FX loop since these amps take pedals like champs up front, but it wouldn't be a hard mod if you wanted to do it. I think that you wouldn't pay a fairly priced tech any more than $150 for all this work. I would definitely consider it as an investment and do it since you have an amazing amp on your hands, a lot better than most new amps (it can easily rival most boutique amps too). Congrats!

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THE SINE WAVE SURFER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

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[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#9
don't replace the filter caps, just get the solder points cleaned, the pots cleaned, switches replaced. you don't really need an effects loop...what kind of effects do you use?
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#11
you should really only replace them unless entirely necessary, vintage filter caps are a part of a vintage amp's tone even if just a little. not to mention they are "sometimes" worth a pretty penny. i've heard horror stories of tech's replacing caps in peoples amps without telling them and selling the old ones for lots of money.
Quote by shakin'cakes
First of all, I enjoy deathcore for it's complexity and it's the only genre heavy enough for me



Quote by Highway60Bob
I want an amp good for playing hippie tunes. I want it to be an actual amp, not a tube amp.
#12
Quote by forsaknazrael
^whats your train of thought with NOT replacing filter caps?
They don't last forever, you know...

They don't, but they can last a really long time. I had one of my amps serviced recently (it's from ~1974) and my tech said that the filter caps were in great shape. He also told me that components weren't made as small as possible back then and were of higher quality a lot of the time. My Bassmaster is also rockin' its original filter caps AFAIK and it runs really quietly, no signs of bad filter caps. It's not always necessary and the internet tends to overhype the filter cap "mystery".

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THE SINE WAVE SURFER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

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[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#14
Thanks for the replies guys.

-So, the re-tubing can be done without Biasing?

-The toggle switch replacement is easy... can be taken care of me.

-I'd prefer an effects loop as I frequently use a lot of delay, and there is no reverb tank on this (I'll need a 'verb pedal, as I'm a big fan of drowning myself in reverb).

Also, what are the different inputs on the YBA-1 for?

What the hell is the 'ground' toggle for?
#15
I wouldn't do any work on a tube amp if you don't know what you're doing because you can easily kill yourself (there are voltages as high as 500 volts and beyond that can be stored in the amp even after a long time).

Yes, the old Bassmasters had a fixed bias and you don't really need to rebias the amp after a tube change. You may want to, but it's not necessary and you'd have to do minor mods to the circuit.

The toggle switch would be easy to replace, but as I said, don't try it yourself if you don't know what you're doing.

FX loops aren't necessary you know. I run all my pedals up front on my Bassmaster (and all amps really) and I LOVE delay and verb, however I don't usually use a load of gain and run it into semi-breakup. I guess if you want the "conventional" sound and you plan on using a lot of amp gain, then an FX loop would be nice, but you can easily do without. If I were you, I'd try running your stuff up front before getting it modded and see if you like it.

The different inputs are reminiscent of the old Marshall Plexis and Fender Bassmans that the amp is derived from. There are two channels (normal and bright) and each channel has a high and low input. The high input is "hotter" and the low input is attenuated, the normal channel is "normal" and the bright channel is more trebly and "bright" sounding and it overdrives easier than the normal channel. You can bridge the channels by pluggin into one channel's input and using another cable, plug one end into that channel's other input and the other end into one of the other channel's inputs. That way you can "blend" the two channels with the two volume controls and you can play around with different sounds and amount of gain. For most gain, plug guitar into normal channel's high input and bridge the normal's low and birght's high inputs. Then dime the volume controls for some balls-to-the-wall tone.

The ground toggle is for shock protection. Back in the day most amps didn't have grounded, three-pronged power plugs and used ground switching circuits to prevent nasty shocks. If your amp still has the two-pronged plug, I would irgently replace it because the shocks can kill and people have died from getting shocked by their amp. It's a simple mod for a tech and should be done.

Take your amp to a tech because it doesn't sound like you have enough knowledge or experience with this stuff. Like I said, you CAN kill yourself and you probably don't want that.

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THE SINE WAVE SURFER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣


[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Boss pedals may be built like tanks but I would rather buy a cardboard box that is on my side than pay for a tank that is working against me.
#16
The absence of an effects loop is a pretty lame reason not to want an amp. Some of the greatest music that you have enjoyed over the years comes from amps that didn't have an effects loop. Effects loops are a relatively new idea and their benefit is one of the most overated things in the guitarist world.

Also I don't swallow that vintage filter caps change the tone of the amp. They are just smoothing out the DC supply, either they work or they don't. An old 16uF cap doesn't filter any better than a new 16uF cap and if they did a worse job the only thing it could cause is hum. Now if you think hum is part of the vintage sound .....................
If the amp is quiet leave the caps alone, if it has a bit of 100Hz hum (120Hz in the US) then replace them. It's that simple.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
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Cathbard Amplification
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Last edited by Cathbard at Jul 30, 2010,
#17
You know you're a redneck when you pronounce "Bassmaster" like the fishing tournaments every time you read it in your head...


Anyways. That's an awesome find. Adding an effects loop will be the most costly part of that job. Why don't you just run the effects out front? It might sound better.

But yeah, get it serviced, full checkup, replace the caps as needed, and put some new tubes in the girl. Sounds like all it needs is a little TLC.
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#18
You know you're a redneck when your new amp sits on top of your old broken amp.

Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band