#1
Once more trying to get a problematic Floyd Rose sorted. Just got it back from the shop, after much hassle, and it feels weird. The trem is floating forward, such that it feels quite unresponsive when I whammy it. It feels as though it should be flat. This is what it looks like when I'm not pressing the bar down.

#2
Yep, it should be flat. That's too high.

Undo the locking nut, maybe detune your strings a little, open the back plate and tighten the screws little by little until it's flush with the body.
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#3
Yep, that's what I figured. Thanks. Jeez, this tech is a joke. He also took out a spring - there's now only two. That going to be a problem?

Quote by GNR4EVER
Yep, it should be flat. That's too high.

Undo the locking nut, maybe detune your strings a little, open the back plate and tighten the screws little by little until it's flush with the body.
#4
where's the extra routing for the back end??? (the bit with the screws)

i'm sure there should be routing to enable that to be pulled back?
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#6
Probably. The two springs are unlikely to be able to counteract the tension of the strings themselves. I have four in my guitar.
#7
The number of springs depends on your string gauge and tuning. Unless you give that information I can't tell you exactly what to do.
#8
Have you guys never heard of a non-floating Floyd bridge? Van Halens guitars only whammy down, not up and he uses OFR's.
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#9
Thanks everyone. I've just screw the two springs tight, and it does feel better. However, tuning seems a little unstable as a result.

I'm using stainless steel Ernie Ball super slinky - 10 to 46, I think. There's no routing for it to be pulled back - custom guitar.
#11
Quote by Nylad
Thanks everyone. I've just screw the two springs tight, and it does feel better. However, tuning seems a little unstable as a result.

I'm using stainless steel Ernie Ball super slinky - 10 to 46, I think. There's no routing for it to be pulled back - custom guitar.


If the tuning is a bit unstable, keep messing with the spring tension to get it to float about 2-3mm off the body, this is where most Vintage trems are set, and they have great tuning stability for a non locking trem, so you shouldn't have any problems.
#12
Vintage trem? I'm a little confused - does that include Floyd Rose of this sort?

Quote by ethan_hanus
If the tuning is a bit unstable, keep messing with the spring tension to get it to float about 2-3mm off the body, this is where most Vintage trems are set, and they have great tuning stability for a non locking trem, so you shouldn't have any problems.
#13
OK, I'm seeing a couple of issues here.

The most obvious is the trem's plate being pitched forward. It needs to be set parallel to the body by balancing spring/string tension....it may OR may not be floating when this particular guitar is set up. That is determined by the action and neck angle in the pocket. (EVH's frankenstrat was slightly floating....that's what the quarter was there for...it was the exact thickness that the floyd floated and he could rotate it under the base plate to prevent the trem from being able to raise pitch)

The other issue I see is the High E's saddle is set too far back. It's beyond it's intonation screw and the front part of the saddle is pitching forward off the base plate (it shoud be flush). Also, the rear part of the saddle can no longer be adjusted fully as it is contacting the base plate (where it angles towards the fine tuners). Did the tech have to move it this far back to set intonation, I'm not sure.

In short, whoever set up your guitar is a MORON and has no business working on guitars. You need to take the guitar back and have them fix everything....or at least give you ALL of your money back.

You can also try and fix everything yourself. It really isn't all that hard.....just takes a bit of learning and understanding of how a Floyd works and what each adjustment does. There are plenty of good YouTube vids as well as articles on the web.
Last edited by webwarmiller at Jul 30, 2010,
#15
Holy Moses. Ugh - can't believe I spent £70 on this (had to get sustain block changed). Hm, I may just cut and paste what you've said to the tech, in the process asking for a refund.

Thanks - this is super good information.

Quote by webwarmiller
OK, I'm seeing a couple of issues here.

The most obvious is the trem's plate being pitched forward. It needs to be set parallel to the body by balancing spring/string tension....it may OR may not be floating when this particular guitar is set up. That is determined by the action and neck angle in the pocket. (EVH's frankenstrat was slightly floating....that's what the quarter was there for...it was the exact thickness that the floyd floated and he could rotate it under the base plate to prevent the trem from being able to raise pitch)

The other issue I see is the High E's saddle is set too far back. It's beyond it's intonation screw and the front part of the saddle is pitching forward off the base plate (it shoud be flush). Also, the rear part of the saddle can no longer be adjusted fully as it is contacting the base plate (where it angles towards the fine tuners). Did the tech have to move it this far back to set intonation, I'm not sure.

In short, whoever set up your guitar is a MORON and has no business working on guitars. You need to take the guitar back and have them fix everything....or at least give you ALL of your money back.

You can also try and fix everything yourself. It really isn't all that hard.....just takes a bit of learning and understanding of how a Floyd works and what each adjustment does. There are plenty of good YouTube vids as well as articles on the web.
#16
I've put it into Eb, so as to allow more bite on the spring. If it's in E regular, the trem leans forward too much (bearing in mind I now have 2 springs, as the tech took one out for some reason).

Quote by Carl_Berg
What tuning are you using?
#17
Quote by Nylad
Vintage trem? I'm a little confused - does that include Floyd Rose of this sort?



Well, since it's not a full floating trem, like most floyds, and the guitar is designed in mind with trem, you want it to float slightly, otherwise, if you have the trem locked to the body, and you divebomb or something, the strings loosen, and when you come back up, instead of going to normal string tension, they will tighten because they were just loose, so they unstreched themselves, and locking it all the way back causes it to stretch again, which throws it out of tune.

Trust me, I have a Squier trem, and I have great tuning stability cause I follow this principle, you want a few mm of give so the strings can return to the right tension, it's like a balancing act between string tension and spring tension.
#18
Ok, that makes sense, thanks. In that case, it might be better if I tune it to E regular rather than Eb?

Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, since it's not a full floating trem, like most floyds, and the guitar is designed in mind with trem, you want it to float slightly, otherwise, if you have the trem locked to the body, and you divebomb or something, the strings loosen, and when you come back up, instead of going to normal string tension, they will tighten because they were just loose, so they unstreched themselves, and locking it all the way back causes it to stretch again, which throws it out of tune.

Trust me, I have a Squier trem, and I have great tuning stability cause I follow this principle, you want a few mm of give so the strings can return to the right tension, it's like a balancing act between string tension and spring tension.
#19
Quote by Nylad
Ok, that makes sense, thanks. In that case, it might be better if I tune it to E regular rather than Eb?



No, you can put it in whatever tuning you want, I set mine in Drop C, but what you need to do is adjust the trem claw, which will adjust the spring tension, and keep tuning your guitar until you get it to float about 2-3 mm off the body, in the correct tuning. It takes a long time, and I would think with a locking trem, even longer.

Takes me about 10 minutes to do mine, but mines not a locking trem.
#20
Here's some photos with my adjustments. Do I need to release the springs more? (BTW: I may have omitted the fact this is a left handed trem, if that makes a difference)







#21
That's a hell of a lot better, and no, it shouldn't matter if it's left handed or not. To me that looks correct, now just make sure it's in tune and lock the strings, and you should be good, if you still have problems, then you should take it to a reliable tech to solve the problem, since it's custom, it could be a number of things.
#22
The left side looks a little higher than the right in that last picture (directions relative to the picture). If so you might want to adjust it so it's equal.
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#23
I think a key point to your issues is going to be that the studs are too far forward. You're never going to intonate the bass E string. Was it originally drilled for a left hand trem?

I suppose you might get it to intonate, but as has been pointed out, that bass E saddle is already not sitting flush, and it should be.

Looks to me from the pics that you could still tighten the springs a bit more. It should be perfectly level. Just a tad more. If it ends up flush, so be it, that is what you have. Being flush shouldn't give you any stability issues, since flush mounted trems and the blocking of floating trems is hardly a rarity.

Anyway, you've done a lot better then your "tech" did. Hope you get your cash back. And the spring he seems to have stolen from you.
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#24
Quote by Ratraisin
I think a key point to your issues is going to be that the studs are too far forward. You're never going to intonate the bass E string. Was it originally drilled for a left hand trem?

I suppose you might get it to intonate, but as has been pointed out, that bass E saddle is already not sitting flush, and it should be.

Looks to me from the pics that you could still tighten the springs a bit more. It should be perfectly level. Just a tad more. If it ends up flush, so be it, that is what you have. Being flush shouldn't give you any stability issues, since flush mounted trems and the blocking of floating trems is hardly a rarity.

Anyway, you've done a lot better then your "tech" did. Hope you get your cash back. And the spring he seems to have stolen from you.


You can't put a trem like that flush with body, it's not routed for that, it's routed like a Standard trem would be, and you never want to lock a standard trem if you plan on using it.

I never noticed the saddles though.
#25
Quote by ethan_hanus
You can't put a trem like that flush with body, it's not routed for that, it's routed like a Standard trem would be, and you never want to lock a standard trem if you plan on using it.

I never noticed the saddles though.


By "flush", I mean "in contact with", not level. I personally haven't seen a Floyd sitting flush, but I don't see what the difference would be to blocking (assuming that all ended up in a place with good action). Either way stops the trem from tilting backwards beyond a certain point.

It is meant to sit perfectly horizontal, though (if that's what you mean by "flush?), so any uptilt and it's not sitting as it was designed to be. The knife edges need to be dead-on perpendicular to the screws.

The TS said this was a 'custom build'. My Floyd is a Schaller and had specific routing plans for that model which differed from other models, and which included the depression for the back tilt. It is possible incorrect routing plans were used and this whole project is not quite what it should be. I dunno.
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Last edited by Ratraisin at Jul 30, 2010,
#26
Quote by Ratraisin
By "flush", I mean "in contact with", not level. I personally haven't seen a Floyd sitting flush, but I don't see what the difference would be to blocking (assuming that all ended up in a place with good action). Either way stops the trem from tilting backwards beyond a certain point.

It is meant to sit perfectly horizontal, though (if that's what you mean by "flush?), so any uptilt and it's not sitting as it was designed to be. The knife edges need to be dead-on perpendicular to the screws.

The TS said this was a 'custom build'. My Floyd is a Schaller and had specific routing plans for that model which differed from other models, and which included the depression for the back tilt. It is possible incorrect routing plans were used and this whole project is not quite what it should be. I dunno.


That may be true, all I know is that you do not want any trem to be locked down to the body due to too much spring tension, it screws with the tuning every time. If you want a hardtail, then lock it down, you want a tremolo effect, then it has to float to some degree. I think a Floyd Rose was a bad choice of trem for this guitar if it has to be perfectly flush to be usable.

There are other types of locking trems that are designed to float like a standard trem. The Super Vee is one, it's designed for mainly strats, but I'm sure you could fit it to your guitar.