#1
..Does anyone know the estimated cost of doing this since I've never had it done professionally before?
#2
What secret knowledge is there to turn a few nuts and screws that you need to pay a professional for? All you need is two screwdrivers, few allen wrenches and a feeler gage and half an hour at most. You should have all tools except the gage, which costs a few bucks. You will learn that it is really easy, and satisfying that the guitar is set up quickly exactly as you like it. The only reason to bring it to a tech is if you need your frets filed and dressed, or some serious repair is needed like cracks or warping, or wiring if you're uncomfortable with a soldering iron.
#3
Don’t go to a dealer; find a good guitar tech who works on his own and it will cost much less. The cost of a setup will run you between $20 and $90 depending on where you live, how much work the frets need, and how much time it takes the tech to straighten things out if the guitar isn’t set up properly in the first place.

What secret knowledge is there to turn a few nuts and screws that you need to pay a professional for?

Yeah, who needs the work of experienced professionals who really know what they’re doing? There’s no way a guy who does a couple guitar setups every day of the year would do a better than someone will with instructions from the internet!
#4
Quote by jpnyc


What secret knowledge is there to turn a few nuts and screws that you need to pay a professional for?

Yeah, who needs the work of experienced professionals who really know what they’re doing? There’s no way a guy who does a couple guitar setups every day of the year would do a better than someone will with instructions from the internet!


Um..not all "techs" are as experienced as they should be.

All set up info can be found online and it really isn't that hard. I am referring to truss rod adjustments, action, intonation, etc. Yes, you could pay someone, and then pay them next time you need a set up, and the next time. As guitars need to have adjustments made at least 1-2 times a year depending on where you live.

It is just more cost effective to try and larn to di it yourself. It would take a lot to really mess something up, and if you do , THEN I would take it to a tech.

Just my .02
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#6
What I need to change is the fact that the 1st e string 1st and 2nd frets won't make a note at all. They buzz bad unless I grip the guitar kind of hard on those frets kind of pulling on the neck to bend it.
#8
Or make slight truss rod adjustment to give it more bow...just a little bit.
Gear
Jackson RR24M - EMG ALX w/ ABQ installed
Ibanez Xiphos - stock
LTD Alexi 600 - stock
Ibanex RG - Tone Zone(bridge), PAF Pro(neck)
Blackstar HT-20H
Fulltone OCD
MXR 10 Band EQ
#9
Quote by ibanezgod1973
raise the action a 1/4 of a turn


I've never dicked around with the truss rod on a guitar so does raising = tighten right or loosen left?
#10
theres no need for a truss rod adjustment just yet, turn the allen bolts on the the bridge counter clockwise, a 1/4 turn 1st and see what`s that`s like ( it isn`t much of an adjustment but will probably be sufficient, if you find you need 1 whole turn then reset and try a truss rod adjustment.

to increase the bow in the neck you tighten the rod, to straighten the neck you loosen the the rod. the thing is with truss rod adjustments is you need to the wood settle down before you see the results and if you encounter any resistance then stop.
#11
Quote by ibanezgod1973
theres no need for a truss rod adjustment just yet, turn the allen bolts on the the bridge counter clockwise, a 1/4 turn 1st and see what`s that`s like ( it isn`t much of an adjustment but will probably be sufficient, if you find you need 1 whole turn then reset and try a truss rod adjustment.

to increase the bow in the neck you tighten the rod, to straighten the neck you loosen the the rod. the thing is with truss rod adjustments is you need to the wood settle down before you see the results and if you encounter any resistance then stop.


That is all wrong. You first make sure there is about .25~.3mm relief in the neck before you adjust action. If you don't do check and there is too much relief, it will look like the action is too high at 17th so you would lower the saddles, but then you will get buzz high on the neck. If there is not enough relief, you would either have too much buzz lower on the neck or you would have to raise the saddle and make the action uncomfortable on higher frets. The point is the truss rod is not to adjust action, but you adjust it to straighten the neck with a little relief before you do anything else.
To increase the bow in the neck, you would loosen the nut, and to straighten it you would tighten it. After you adjust the neck, raise the action a quarter or half turn on the high E and B strings until they don't buzz too much and they don't fret out when bending - usually 1.6 mm is a good starting point when measured at 17th.
#12
Quote by KingStill
That is all wrong. You first make sure there is about .25~.3mm relief in the neck before you adjust action. If you don't do check and there is too much relief, it will look like the action is too high at 17th so you would lower the saddles, but then you will get buzz high on the neck. If there is not enough relief, you would either have too much buzz lower on the neck or you would have to raise the saddle and make the action uncomfortable on higher frets. The point is the truss rod is not to adjust action, but you adjust it to straighten the neck with a little relief before you do anything else.
To increase the bow in the neck, you would loosen the nut, and to straighten it you would tighten it. After you adjust the neck, raise the action a quarter or half turn on the high E and B strings until they don't buzz too much and they don't fret out when bending - usually 1.6 mm is a good starting point when measured at 17th.



did you actually read what i said, `cos if you did you would realise that, i said

if you find you need 1 whole turn then reset and try a truss rod adjustment.


then go and read page 8 of the ibanez prestige manual

http://www.ibanez.com/support/manuals
Last edited by ibanezgod1973 at Jul 30, 2010,
#13
Sounds like zero relief or even a back bow to me. Could also me a low nut slot. When diagnosing any guitar issue OR when setting them up, you start at the headstock and work your way to the bridge.

1. Check nut height. One at a time lightly fret each string btw the 2nd and 3rd fret with finder closest to 2nd. String now forms a straight line from break point at nut to top of 2nd fret. As such there should be a tiny gap between the 1st fret and the string. If not, you are likely to have some fret buzz when that string is played open.

2. Next move on to truss. Lightly fret the 1st fret and last fret of low E string. Look for a PLAYING card's thickness gap btw the 7-8th fret tops and the bottom of the string. If no gap loosed truss 1/8 a turn (counter clockwise) at a time and recheck. Too much gap, do just the opposite.

3. Finally get to the bridge. Initially set the action to about 2mm low E and 1.6mm high E. If your saddles are individually adjustable (most fender bridges) also make sure the saddles match the radius of the fretboard. Set intonation as well.

4. Play test guitar. Is there any buzz? If so, where is it? Does it show up in an entire region of the neck (need to adjust truss) or is it just on a couple of random frets here and there (uneven fretwork). If you are buzzing only on lower frets then you should add just a hair more relief....buzzing in the middle, take out a little relief. If you get to a point where eveything is good you can lower the action a bit at the bridge.

Pretty much every adjustment on a guitar is a compromise. With relief it's a compromise btw buzz on the lower frets versus buzz in the middle frets. With action its a compromise btw height and buzz. This is one reason you should learn to do this stuff yourself....a 'perfect' setup is a LOT of personal preference and how you play the guitar. Learn what works best for you....
#14
what would you reccomend for guitars where you have to take the neck off to adjust the trussrod?

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#15
Quote by glenthemann
what would you reccomend for guitars where you have to take the neck off to adjust the trussrod?


trial and error.... Measure where it currently is and then take an educated guess at how much you'll have to turn the truss. Loosen the strings, capo the first fret, and then take off the neck just enough to make the adjustment. Put neck back on, remove capo, tune to pitch, and recheck. If really close leave it for a while as it might settle in a bit more. If still way off, then start over....

On such guitars I perfer to use screw inserts and machine screws for attaching the neck. Never have to worry the holes getting stripped out...