#1
I understand overwinding and underwinding, but what if you wrap it more in one place and less in the other? Is there some sort of rule, or perhaps a diagram that could explain this?
#3
physics my friend, physics.

a lot of it has to do with the capacitance between the coils. when two pieces of wire are close together, they have an effect on one another. if they are pefectly paralleled, that effect is typically greater. more stuff goes into it than that, but thats all i feel like going into right now.
#5
^It's much more noticable than you might think. It doesn't seem like it should be, but it is.

Quote by ohspyro89
if you're talking about humbuckers, usually there is a main coil and slave coil. The main coil has more winds on it for better voicing when it's split. The slave coil.... is just a slave.


That's not actually true. Although it is common for one coil, usually the slug coil, to have more winds, there is no "slave" coil. Although the slug coil provides more output, even when it's wound the same amout and the slug coil, both coils have an equal role in tone shaping.

Quote by wesmwatson
I understand overwinding and underwinding, but what if you wrap it more in one place and less in the other? Is there some sort of rule, or perhaps a diagram that could explain this?


There is no straightforward answer to this. When the wire is closer to the magnetic core it gives you brighter tone and more output so if you have a large bulge somewhere it can give you a slightly fatter sounding pickup but it's not always the case. It's also important to remember that if there is a large bulge the wire is more likely to loosen with time so you get microphonic feedback so you should try to get a relatively even spread. It's possible to get the warmer tone with an even spread by modifying your scatter when winding which is a better idea than having a lop sided wind because it's less likely to give feedback after a couple years. That said... to much scatter can cause feedback too. This is really something that you simply have to experiment with.
Last edited by CorduroyEW at Jul 31, 2010,