#1
I have heard a lot about home recording on computers, and i was wondering if someone could give some advice. I was wondering if anyone knows of a good cheapish laptop that would support Pro Tools efficiency. I dont know a whole lot about recording, but what other adapters and port things would i need to record a guitar and vocals? any advice would be nice
#2
Most laptops have shitty sound cards and anything you record will sound like shit. IF you still want to use a laptop, make sure it has a good sound car, OR it has a changeable sound card OR buy an external sound card. It's basically much better to buy big PC because you'd need lots of powa if you plan on using plugins for real-time audio editing, for example the ones that are used to create different guitar tones.
#4
Okay, first off, do you have a Pro Tools capable interface? If you've got an Mbox, 003, or one of the many M-Audio interfaces that support Pro Tools M-Powered, you don't need a sound card. An interface replaces the sound card. If you're not, then you're using a pirated copy of Pro Tools which makes you a loser.

Second, how much are you looking to spend? You're probably gonna spend about $600 on a decent laptop to get Pro Tools running well. Obviously, the more you spend, the better but $600 for the laptop is minimum that you're gonna spend. If you don't have an interface yet, you're looking at about $1000 to get a laptop, interface and, if you're using an M-Audio Device, Pro Tools M-Powered.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#5
Ok, I don't have Pro Tools, that's just the program I'm probably going to buy. So is there a specific package that would come with the mbox or something? my soundcard is extremely crappy and I want to know it won't be like defective.
#6
Geez... I keep saying this in different threads....

Laptops are not ideal for recording. The main reason is drive speed. Most PCs have hard drives that turn 7200rpm. Some - if you've got the bucks - go faster... 10 000.

But the faster the drive spins, the more power it uses. For a laptop user, this is a big deal. So, laptop manufacturers put in 5400rpm hard drives as a perfectly reasonable compromise between performance and battery drain.

What that means to you, as someone who wants to record, is that the speed of your hard drive is the single most important factor in determining how many tracks at a time you'll be able to record and play back. With a 5400rpm drive... I could only hazard a guess, but you'll probably start having problems at around 8 tracks, more or less.

If you want to record, get a desktop.

I suppose another alternative is the new solid state drives. Apparently, access time is wicked fast, and since there are no moving parts, there is nothing to break down. Of course, they are priced accordingly.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
I do not recommend running PT on a laptop. Desktops are cheaper and MUCH more powerful. If you're going to invest why not go all the way?
Audio Ecstasy Productions!

Guitar/Backline Tech in the Los Angeles area and on tour!
Custom guitar pedals and cabling for stage and studio!

I set up DAWs and tweak computers to record audio. Hit me up @ audioecstasyproductions[at}gmail.com
#8
ive been wondering the same thing as far as a recording setup. I cant decide whether to find something on tigerdirect.com or go with a good hp for around a grand, any other good desktops for recording? besides the ever so popular mac
#9
Any off-the-shelf desktop will be just fine. We did our album - each song upwards to 36 tracks of 24-bit audio - on a Celeron 1.7Ghz PC with 512 MB RAM. You can barely give away a machine like that now.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
IBM ThinkCenter Intel 2.8 Ghz (single core)
1.5 GB RAM
Win 7 Home Premium 32
two LCD monitors... a 20" and a 23"
Cubase 4
Delta 1010
TC Electronic M300
Behringer UB2442-FX PRO mixer
some other stuff.... headphone distribution amp, behringer outboard compressor, mics by Sure, Rode, Behringer, Sennheiser, AKG

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#11
The 8 analog ins/outs are 1/4" jacks. The 2 digital ins/outs are SPDIF.

To run mics into it, I plug the mic either into my mixer or into a dedicated rack tube pre I have.

... and then there's midi in/out.

The 1010 is the rack mount one. The 1010 LT trades the rack-mounted break-out box for a couple of XLR inputs... I guess it has a couple of built-in pres.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
It seems I'm in a similar place as this thread's starter. Owning a laptop, and wanting to do mostly acoustic stuff (maybe full band later on down the road), would I be able to just buy a good condenser mic, PT LE, and call it good? Or is an M-Box the way to go?

If I bought an M-Box, I have a couple questions.

1. Does that mean the program runs from the box, and not my computer, allowing me to use my laptop because it takes the stress off of it?

2. Whats the difference between ProTools M-Powered and PT LE?
Guitar: '85 Gibson Les Paul Custom Shop Edition
Amp: Line 6 Spider III 30
Pedal: Line 6 FBV Footswitch/Wah/Tuner

I love Jesus! Thank you Lord, for allowing me to play my instrument with the talents you have given me for You.