#1
I've finally admitted to myself that it's not practical to keep lugging my 90-pound bass amp up and down the stairs to and from my 3rd story apartment at school every time I go home, so I need to buy a practice amp to keep with me there. However, I've also been wanting a small guitar amp for composition reasons, and I can only afford one or the other. I'm leaning towards the guitar amp because I could technically use it for my bass and I'd also have the guitar settings and effects I'm looking for. I know that combo guitar amp speakers and in some cases the head itself can be damaged by playing bass through them, and that they aren't built structurally for bass frequencies, but I was wondering if I could avoid significant damage if I kept volume and any other relevant settings to a minimum.
#2
The amp itself will never be damaged by a bass. The voice coil of the speakers can melt if you push them too hard with low frequencies they can't handle. If you keep the volume fairly low you could do it. Just don't crank it for extended periods.
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#3
If I'm not mistaken, the bassist of Yes used a guitar amp for his bass, on which he turned down the bass to 0, and the mids and highs to max. So yes, I think it's possible
#4
the speaker will degrade over time as it's not made to handle bass frequencies, you could do it as a temporary fix or just swap the speaker for a bass one
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#6
You could get a bass practice amp and a cheap amp simulator (I'm thinking something like a digitech GNX or boss GT) then you have all the options you want for effects and sound + not wearing down your amp.

Hope you find a solution!
#8
As long as you keep the volume down it’s fine. If you turn it up (to gigging volumes) and start playing fast you can actually create air pressure that will tear a guitar speaker. Or you could try using a small bass amp with the guitar (like a Pathfinder).

If you aren’t downtuning your bass so far that it needs a subwoofer you could also just use monitor speakers with a Sansamp GT2 which is made to handle guitar and bass frequencies.
#9
^ That. A bass amp will handle guitar better than a guitar amp will handle bass. Plus they are fun for adding a pedal or two on to.
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#10
Thanks for all the responses!

I was just thinking... since all I need the amp for in regards to my bass is practice, would using headphones put me in the clear? It sounds like the only potential problems have to do with the speakers, which unless I'm missing something would be completely bypassed by headphones.
#11
Headphones should be fine. But you might have to try a few sets to get something that can handle an unprocessed bass sound well. Cheap headphones seem to work best with guitar amps because they often cannot reproduce the really high end where all the hiss, hum, and static lives.
#12
Just make sure the amp has a headphone out and don't try to plug them into the speaker outs.
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#14
Don't crank it and you should be fine. The speaker could be damaged if you pump it out for too long.
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