#1
hey UG

ive moved from playing second guitar in my hair metal band to lead, so i really get to break in my chorus and delay now!

but other than pentatonics, are there any other scales that were used alot in hair metal?
#5
The scales are mostly just major and minor, and the mode is usually Dorian. I suppose if you wanted to switch it up a bit you could use the Phyrgian mode or sometimes I like to use the harmonic minor scale. Basically, Dorian = typical big rock sound, Phrygian = darker and more metal sound, and harmonic minor scale = neoclassical sound (Yngwie Malmsteen). At least, that's how my guitar teacher taught me to remember them.
#6
Neither of those modes really apply here that much, it's nearly always going to be the major and minor scales. It's not even worth mentioning the pentatonics as a separate entity seeing as you're still using their 7 note equivalents, you're just not using all the notes.
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#7
there's the whole-step scale they use in jazz, where every note has whole steps in between them (instead of 2 whole, 1 half, 3 whole, 1 half)
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#9
Basically all the scales sound the same unless you only use fragments.
Scale running sounds the same, unles you're contrasting something like mixolydian from locrian... but other than that I find them in runs of notes longer than 15 notes to be indistinguishable to people with a normal ear (compared to a trained ear)
#10
Quote by TheChosen1One
Basically all the scales sound the same unless you only use fragments.
Scale running sounds the same, unles you're contrasting something like mixolydian from locrian... but other than that I find them in runs of notes longer than 15 notes to be indistinguishable to people with a normal ear (compared to a trained ear)


What on earth are you talking about?

If you can't tell the difference between one scale and the next I would suggest it's you who is in dire need of ear training.
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#11
Major, minor, pentatonic, and maybe the harmonic minor, and you'll be fine
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#12
Quote by Noslo13
The scales are mostly just major and minor, and the mode is usually Dorian. I suppose if you wanted to switch it up a bit you could use the Phyrgian mode or sometimes I like to use the harmonic minor scale. Basically, Dorian = typical big rock sound, Phrygian = darker and more metal sound, and harmonic minor scale = neoclassical sound (Yngwie Malmsteen). At least, that's how my guitar teacher taught me to remember them.

I usually hear Aeolian used more often in that genre (instead of Dorian.)
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#13
Quote by TMF128
I usually hear Aeolian used more often in that genre (instead of Dorian.)

That's probable. I'm not really a theory enthusiast, I just play guitar semi-decently well and have only the most rudimentary knowledge of how it works.