#1
i was playing guitar yesterday and i notice that the C is kind of and extended D shape(open chords) i mean you have the

D shape C shape

E-2 e-0
B-3 B-1
G-2 G-0
D-0 D-2
A-3


But you can also play a C and D the other way

D shape C(inversion)

E-2 e-0
B-3 B-1
G-2 G-0
D-4
A-5

hope this make same sense
#3
Yeah, the above is how most people would play a C chord.

0
1
0
2
3
0

and then a D would be

2
3
2
0
0
0
Last edited by Insaneguy75 at Jul 31, 2010,
#4
Yep, it's the same basic principle as moving an open E shape up two frets, making F#.

That's the beauty of guitar, these shapes and patterns show up everywhere.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
There similarity is the same as the similarity between a G and A shape open chord

They are similar but not the same...

Here is an open D

2
3
2
0
x
x

Here is a D using a C chord shape
2
3
2
4
5
x

Similar (top three strings are the same) but they are not the same.

Looking at A and G shapes...

A
0
2
2
2
0
x

A using a G shape:

x (5 is an option but tough to finger)
2
2
2
4
5

Three strings are the same but the rest are different. The shapes share some notes in common which gives them some similarities but are not the same. This principle is one of the fundamental concepts used in the CAGED system.

Peace
Si
#7
Yes, most chords are either voiced as 1 - 3 - 5 - 1 - 5 or 1 - 5 - 1 - 3 - 5


The former is used is open chords such as C and G, or the shift in D you provided, while the latter in barre chords or open chords such as D, E, and A, as well as their minor version. Notice if you shift those shape up any amount of frets it creates a barre chord.
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wtf is a selfie? is that like, touching yourself or something?
#8
If you are familiar with CAGED you know that the "D" and "C" shapes are next to each other and overlap.