#1
my older brother was visiting a while ago, and he and his friend ben were in my back yard playing their acoustic guitars. i heard them playing "white lies" by the rx bandits so i went back there and listened. i asked ben to teach me the song, so he started telling me the chords, then my brother (just cause he likes to mess around i guess) started playing the vocal melody of the song on his guitar. i asked him what key the song was in and he had to think about it for a minute then he answered, and i asked "how do you figure out melodies without knowing what key its in?" well his answer was that he just knows what scales sound good with each chord so he never has to know the key of a song. this really confused me, and my progressive rock guitar book also mentioned "chord scales" and reffered me to a different book i dont have, so i really hae no clue if thats the same thing my brother was using or what, im really confused and i'd like to learn these more chord-specific type scales because...well its good to know as much as possible right? so can any1 explain these scales to me and help me out?

summary of the above: my bro told me he never has to know what key a song is in because he knows what scales sound good with each individual chord, regardless of the chord's context. this confused me and i'd like to learn these scales, can any1 help?
#2
you can play a different scale over different chord. ex. a 12 bar blues progression in E can be played with E pentatonic (minor/major) or with E pentatonic on the E chord, A pentatonic on the A, and B on the B. As far as I remeber it's called vertical and horizontal approach. ...or sth like that.
#3
Quote by Gh.
you can play a different scale over different chord. ex. a 12 bar blues progression in E can be played with E pentatonic (minor/major) or with E pentatonic on the E chord, A pentatonic on the A, and B on the B. As far as I remeber it's called vertical and horizontal approach. ...or sth like that.

you mean like i could use the pentatonic scale for any chord and itll work?
like if im playing a 2-5-1 progression in the key of C (Dmin, Gmaj, Cmaj) I could use the Dminor pentatonic, Gmajor pentatonic, and Cmajor pentatonic?
#4
Quote by TMVATDI

summary of the above: my bro told me he never has to know what key a song is in because he knows what scales sound good with each individual chord, regardless of the chord's context. this confused me and i'd like to learn these scales, can any1 help?

That kind of stuff comes after the basics, happens a lot on jazz but if you're not really up on your stuff you can end up sounding awkward and disjointed.

If you want to play a solo or melody that fits with the piece as a whole then you need to know the key. If you want to treat the chords as "islands" instead you can but most musicians don't do that. The chords are there to guide you so you know which particular notes of the scale will sound best at any given time, but you're still generally using a single scale as your framework throughout the whole song.
Actually called Mark!

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