#1
I want to get my little brother started on guitar this year. So when his birthday comes around in October I want to get him an electric. He'll be seven so I will want something intended for young learners that is also of quality. Are those squier mini strats any good? Does anyone have any experience with guitars intended for young learners? It's not like I can go to guitar center and try a bunch out so I'm kinda completely out of it. An ibanez mini? Idk.
#2
I know a ten year old who plays a yamaha pacifica (strat copy) how big is your brother.
#3
Check the half and 3/4 sized guitars at rondomusic.com
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#5
In my experience for young kids it's best to get them started on a classical acoustic which is lighter and far less complicated. By all means if you want to get him an electric go for a cheap starter pack but IMO an acoustic will be easier for him to learn the fundamentals and gague whether he will actually be interested in learning or not.

0.02
#6
Quote by AxSilentxLine
In my experience for young kids it's best to get them started on a classical acoustic which is lighter and far less complicated. By all means if you want to get him an electric go for a cheap starter pack but IMO an acoustic will be easier for him to learn the fundamentals and gague whether he will actually be interested in learning or not.

0.02

I agree. If I were you I would start him on a 3/4 size acoustic then when he gets a bit older buy him an electric. He probably wouldn't be as confused by an acoustic.
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#7
An electric might be a good decision here, as opposed to an acoustic.

Pros:

- It''s "cool". Though I'm out of touch with the average seven year old's musical tastes, I'd most kid's would gravitate towards an electric guitar, being that it's used far more often in most popular music. Also, even with the fizzy, grainy distortion of the cheapest practice amp, power chords will sound "cool" and are easy to play. Whatever he has, if he's not excited to play it, then it'll collect dust in a corner.

- It's tougher. A bolt on solid body electric will take much more abuse from drops, bumps, and whatever seven year olds are doing with their guitars these days.

- It's easier to play. The string tension is way less than a steel string acoustic, and the thinner neck is much better suited to small hands. The classical guitar I have (and rarely play) has a neck that feels like you're wrapping your hands around the fat end of a baseball bat, not a guitar neck.

That's my two cents that I'm dropping in the electric guitar pile.

As far as which brand and model, I can't help you much, but I'd say something 3/4 scale would be best, but this might be a good starting point.

http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/navigation/travel-mini-electric-guitars?N=100001+306245+7
#8
From all the seven year olds i've known (including myself) they have very short attention spans and get easily frustrated. I would be worried that an electric would be too complicated and he would lose interest. A classical guitar on the other hand (nylon strings by the way) is something he can strum away on even without an amp and they are much tougher than they look
#9
Quote by AxSilentxLine
From all the seven year olds i've known (including myself) they have very short attention spans and get easily frustrated. I would be worried that an electric would be too complicated and he would lose interest. A classical guitar on the other hand (nylon strings by the way) is something he can strum away on even without an amp and they are much tougher than they look


I understand where you're coming from, but I still respectfully (partially) disagree with you.

Kids these days are used to plugging in chargers into handheld gaming devices (good lord I sound like an old man), and quite a few 7 year olds can plug a game system into a tv and have it working in 5 minutes.

I would find it plausible that many 7 year olds would be able to do the same with a simple 1 knob guitar plugged into a basic practice amp.

I guess it all boils down to the competency of the kid, but I would still personally go with an electric for most kids.

#10
Quote by mattocaster99
I understand where you're coming from, but I still respectfully (partially) disagree with you.

Kids these days are used to plugging in chargers into handheld gaming devices (good lord I sound like an old man), and quite a few 7 year olds can plug a game system into a tv and have it working in 5 minutes.

I would find it plausible that many 7 year olds would be able to do the same with a simple 1 knob guitar plugged into a basic practice amp.

I guess it all boils down to the competency of the kid, but I would still personally go with an electric for most kids.



Both arguments are valid. The kid's competence/size would be a deciding factor then.
Either way, something cheap, yet decent quality. e.g. SX, First act (still have my first acoustic from them tuned in drop G )
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#11
The Mini Squiers are garbage. We got my brother one and it won't hold tune worth a damn. I can't really make any recommendations but avoid the Squier Minis.
E-peen:
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Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
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#12
+1 to the classical acoustic
Imagine if he loses interest but keeps the guitar. His future girlfriends thoughts.
Acoustic= oh he's in tune with his emotions. Maybe someday he could write me a song and sing it to me on a beach in Hawaii. I'll wear nothing but a coconut.
Electric= Loser

I speak from experience.
#13
i would go with an electric, being a seven year old not too long ago i much prefered an electric, just being able to hit the overdrive button and hit the strings sounded cool and made me wat to learn more and dont worry about him being able to set it up, most 5 year olds are probably more electronically minded than you think.
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#14
The classical acoustic seems like a good idea, if you were to go with an electric the Yamaha Pacifica is a great starter.
#15
Classical guitar does have certain advantages to very young players, least of which is not the fact that nylon strings would be kinder to his baby's bum fingertips. Most of us forget how painful it was when we first started playing and for a 10 yo that would be even more acute.
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#16
Quote by somemaycallmeti
+1 to the classical acoustic
Imagine if he loses interest but keeps the guitar. His future girlfriends thoughts.
Acoustic= oh he's in tune with his emotions. Maybe someday he could write me a song and sing it to me on a beach in Hawaii. I'll wear nothing but a coconut.
Electric= Loser

I speak from experience.


You've had a girl wear nothing but a coconut on the beach for you?
Quote by Demonikk
Disco break!

Quote by Julz127
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#18
I hate acoustic and acoustic pieces, so I vote for the electric.

Acoustic radio days = worst idea ever. Way to totally screw up my routine by having to change stations for one whole day to avoid bad unplugged covers.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#19
I got an acoustic when i was 7, learned 3 chords, put it down and picked up an electric 5 years later.

Get him an electric, i found learning the acoustic at a young age was more of a chore, like giving your kid a clarinet or something. All the books that came with it or lessons you got were all learning to read music, and play Gypsy Dance, learn to enjoy the instrument first, then learn the harder stuff. Unless hes into that, which most kids arent.

Get him something with a 24" scale length, not quite 3/4 scale, still short enough for a 7 year old to play, but will still last him his lifetime.

squier duo sonic comes to mind, though theyre a bit pricey, but very nice quality, scour ebay for the best deals.

All those mini guitars are shit, sound shit, dont hold tune, will not intonate at all and feel terrible.
Last edited by beckyjc at Aug 4, 2010,
#20
epiphone peewee les paul
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#21
Someone should make three-string guitars for teaching the wee ones to play metal rhythm.
#23
Quote by AxSilentxLine
In my experience for young kids it's best to get them started on a classical acoustic which is lighter and far less complicated. By all means if you want to get him an electric go for a cheap starter pack but IMO an acoustic will be easier for him to learn the fundamentals and gague whether he will actually be interested in learning or not.

0.02


While from a technical aspect I agree, but for me...I wasn't interested in guitar until I got an electric. I've since gained a love for acoustic, but in the beginning I just wanted to kick ass and take names...

Saying all this to say...a standard starter pack should be fine.

Also, there are some websites that sell 3/4 and 1/2 size guitars...but in the long run I think that would hurt more than it would help. If he starts on a normal guitar, it only gets easier as he grows, but if he starts on a mini one, then its going to be a pain in the ass when he moves up to a standard size.
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#24
^ Yeah I guess different strokes for different folks as Kyle would say

I know when I was a kid I had a crappy old classical acoustic and I couldn't afford an electric for years but to me a guitar was a guitar I played it regardless I didn't even pick up an electric til a few years later.
#25
Quote by AxSilentxLine
^ Yeah I guess different strokes for different folks as Kyle would say

I know when I was a kid I had a crappy old classical acoustic and I couldn't afford an electric for years but to me a guitar was a guitar I played it regardless I didn't even pick up an electric til a few years later.


Haha, I wish I had been okay with learning on acoustic.

Its too bad I couldn't do any Chugga Chigga Wuggas or Meedly Meedlys on an acoustic, or I would have started learning way earlier!
Quote by rmr024
Well, in California, people carry around devices that control the minds of bears. So expect to see people walking their bears.

Also, don't be surprised if some robot hookers try to solicit sex to you on the streets.
#26
My friend Cameron. When he was 15, he could play SOAD, Metallica, Slayer, Avenged Sevenfold. He was crazy.
Coolio dude.
#27
Quote by beckyjc
I got an acoustic when i was 7, learned 3 chords, put it down and picked up an electric 5 years later.


Ditto, Yamaha pacifica or full size squier, a full size will begin to stretch the fingers and it can last them years, if you go for a strat style (pacifica/squier) then it comes with the 'awesome' whammy bar that is really popular with kids, show them some hendrix videos if they think it gets dull
#28
having been a salesman in a music store i've noticed this.

Guitars are guitars and any will do when it comes to the purpose of just learning. But, dependent on what the kid (or adult) is interested in, they will be more eager to learn if they have equipment that is more suitable to their goals.

I got a lot of adults that wanted an acoustic for their kid "because its best to learn on" when the kid really wanted an electric so they could learn how to play slayer or children of bodom songs. Its not that they couldn't learn it on an acoustic, but they had more fun if they could have some distortion.

If the kid really liked acoustic songs then they got the acoustic, because it was just more suitable for their taste of music.

acoustic or electric will be fine for learning. But, try to get the right tool for the job.

About the "electric guitar being too confusing".. i think you're not cutting your 7 year old enough credit. if he's smart enough to put his hands on a fretboard and make a chord, he'll be fine playing with the knobs on peavey vypyr.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#29
Go with an electric, but full sized. Kids are growing. They will need new guitars ooner or later. If all kids had guitars though, I'd shoot myself. So don't give all kid guitars.

EDIT: WTF, that made no sence...
..I was watching my death.