#1
How do all of you think up of good chord progressions without repeating yourself all the time?

I'm kind of stuck with a problem that all of my original chord progressions sound horrible.

Basically all I'm doing is picking random chords that work with the scale I'm working with, and put it together. I'm pretty sure that's not the best way to do it though, because it's not working for me.
#2
Different keys have different chords associated with them which are created by the scale associated with that key. By learning these chords and some theory you can take all the guess work out and stop your progressions from sounding "horrible".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
Rhythm can change everything. I play lots of rock and metal stuff so I usually use powerchords, 9th chords, 4ths, etc...

But to be honest I don't usually think "Okay, I'll play a C, then an F, then an Am" I usually just choose a key, let my mind go blank, and just play a few chords. Then I change the chords if I don't like how they sound, then I usually write out or at least say the rhythm and change it if I want to.

Idk if that helps at all xD
Quote by willT08
Quote by HowSoonisNow
How was Confucius death metal?
You've clearly never read any Confuscius.

As I wait on the edge of the earth,
I can see the walls being torn down again
Only to be rebuilt in another name,
On a different day
#4
Quote by AlanHB
Different keys have different chords associated with them which are created by the scale associated with that key. By learning these chords and some theory you can take all the guess work out and stop your progressions from sounding "horrible".

Just so you know where I am on my theory: I know how to find what chords are supposed to work with scales (maj, min, min, maj, maj, min, dim for Major scales and stuff like that) if thats what you mean by different chords associated with different keys.

I also know which chords are Dominant, Sub-Dominant, etc. But I don't know what that all means musically, and how they relate to each other, I can only name them. Would it help if I understood that better? and does anybody know any lessons that could teach me about that?
#5
Quote by nbur4556
I also know which chords are Dominant, Sub-Dominant, etc. But I don't know what that all means musically, and how they relate to each other, I can only name them. Would it help if I understood that better? and does anybody know any lessons that could teach me about that?

Actually yes, that would. A lot. Especially the bolded. Look up "Chord Families" and "Chord Functions". Or I'll go into more detail tomorrow. Either one.

Who says I don't use the same chord progression? I'm pretty sure in every one of the songs I've written recently I've used the bii - i, bii - I, or i - bII. I've just developed my "sound" enough to where I can do the same thing... but do it in different ways.

Add instruments. Change the rhythm. Change the octave. Rhythmic transposition. Play where the rests normally would be. Change the time sig. Anything you can to vary it up a bit. Even the ol' I - IV - V can sound AMAZING(ly original) in the hands of someone who's great with melody and harmony.
#6
^ Truth. A lot of what I write is i - VII - VI, I - bVII - bVI, played straight or slightly modified. I just love the way it sounds thanks to all of the post-hardcore I listen to, which lives and breaths off of that very progression.

One of the easiest ways to get a deep familiarity with these subjects is to use them frequently in your writing. Another way is to analyze the chord progressions of songs you like. Start with simple stuff (if you like Green Day, start there). Chances are you'll start running across the same progression over and over. Listen to those songs and hear the similarities, but also notice the differences. If you have any problems analyzing a chord progression, bring it to us.
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Aug 2, 2010,