#1
I'm trying to improve my ability at improvising guitar solos. I always here how important it is to "follow the chords". It's hard to do that when the chords, single note rhythms etc are changing super fast. Like in lots of hard rock and metal songs. How do you follow changes that are so quick without mimicking the riff itself?
#2
Quote by The\m/
I'm trying to improve my ability at improvising guitar solos. I always here how important it is to "follow the chords". It's hard to do that when the chords, single note rhythms etc are changing super fast. Like in lots of hard rock and metal songs. How do you follow changes that are so quick without mimicking the riff itself?



Instead of following the chords you could just see what key the riffage is in and solo in that key.
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#3
Quote by megano28
Instead of following the chords you could just see what key the riffage is in and solo in that key.

Agreed. In most rock and Metal (this is also true of a lot of Jazz), the lead guitarists solos over the key. If the riff has notes from the Eminor scale, you solo in Eminor. If it's in Emajor, you solo in Emajor. Etc., etc., etc.
#5
And incase you don't already know, if there is a key change, the best thing to do is find a note (or notes) from both keys and play it (or them) during the change.
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#6
pick out the notes that carry from chord to chord

e.g. Cmaj - Fmaj - Amin

C, E, G

F, A, C

A, C, E

so you could hold a C the entire time, or play an E the first and second chords etc. etc.

playing the 3rd (or the 7th, 9th) of a chord also adds a good sound
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#7
Regardless of the key following the chords is still vital.

It's the difference between playing a coherent solo that functions as part of the song or simple random noodling.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Aug 2, 2010,
#8
It should also be remembered that 99% of those super-technical solos are pre-written, and the guitarist has committed the entire thing to memory.
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#9
Quote by steven seagull
Regardless of the key following the chords is still vital.

It's the difference between playing a coherent solo that functions as part of the song or simple random noodling.


I disagree with that statement to some extent as knowing the key(with a little theory) will help you accentuate the tonic and dominant which in turn helps your solo match the riffage even better.

TS just focus on the "target notes" which are notes which are constantly played through out the riffs and make it so that your solos resolve on these notes when played, that should take care of any issues concerning being coherent.
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#10
Quote by megano28
I disagree with that statement to some extent as knowing the key(with a little theory) will help you accentuate the tonic and dominant which in turn helps your solo match the riffage even better.

TS just focus on the "target notes" which are notes which are constantly played through out the riffs and make it so that your solos resolve on these notes when played, that should take care of any issues concerning being coherent.



which is what i said - the chord tones , its really your best bet

and TS wanted to avoid mimicking the riff, so writing a melodic solo over the riff is what they were after
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1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


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How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#11
Quote by megano28

TS just focus on the "target notes" which are notes which are constantly played through out the riffs and make it so that your solos resolve on these notes when played, that should take care of any issues concerning being coherent.


I think you're not looking deep enough at the riff. Riffs are either made up of chords or a melody which is derived from the chord structure itself. By referring to the notes used in the riff, you're actually deriving notes from melody which is already chords, or notes which are themselves derived from a chord structure.

Basically it's easier to cut out the middle man in the latter circumstance and refer to the chord structure, rather than referring to a melody which is referring to the chord structure.
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