#1
Where can you go with it? What are the most popular jobs to go for once you get a certain degree?


Also to anyone doing Music something in Uni, what are your plans once the course is finished?


Just a bit confused where to go reall =S ..can anyone help?
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#3
teach other people to get a music degree (it's a vicious cycle) haha, but really you could be in an orchestra? or help design instruments?
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#4
Pretty much it leads nowhere. I made that mistake. I had a blast doing the degree, but it really doesn't qualify you for any jobs that you couldn't have done otherwise. It's basically the same for all arts degrees.
#5
McDonald's?

Going for a music degree, I'd do research.
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#7
Make jingles for commercials, big bucks in that.
Compose musical scores for tv and movies, big bucks there.
Become a music professor yourself.
Become a really good musician with your knowledge and get famous.

Those are just a few that i know off the top of my head, I'm sure there are more of course. Go ask your professors and counselors at the Uni that you are planning to or currently attending.
#8
The only tangible use of a music degree is music education. In the practical world of music, no one cares if you have a degree or not, they're looking for what you can actually do and have achieved. In this sense, working toward a music degree should not be so much for the title but for the skills that you gain, which is the opposite of many other careers.

However, there are music related degrees that get tangible use. Production and engineering, for example.

I plan on either going for a Ph.D in composition or writing music for visual media when I'm done.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#9
Quote by Wesseem
teach other people to get a music degree (it's a vicious cycle)


+1

You can also live at your parents house and post on the UG all day.
#10
Has anyone on hear recieved a degree and has a good paying job?
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#11
Be a session musician.
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#12
Quote by Chris3235
Has anyone on hear recieved a degree and has a good paying job?


Hell yeah I do.
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#13
Well, my guitar teacher does music lectures in a nearby college, teaches guitar privately and regularly gigs with various bands and music groups. He did his music degree, and he seems to be doing alright.
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#14
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Be a session musician.

You don't need a performance degree to be a session musician.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#16
Several highly successful musicians (Gaga and Mayer come to mind) dropped out of music college before they graduated.
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#17
Quote by Xiaoxi
You don't need a performance degree to be a session musician.


Maybe not, but I guarantee you it helps a lot.
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#18
Quote by Xiaoxi
You don't need a performance degree to be a session musician.


And it's not like there are thousands of jobs as a session musician either!
#19
Quote by SlinkyBlue
Several highly successful musicians (Gaga and Mayer come to mind) dropped out of music college before they graduated.

Yeah, I'm pretty sure John Mayer said his education at Berklee wasn't doing shit so he dropped out.
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#20
Quote by SlinkyBlue
Several highly successful musicians (Gaga and Mayer come to mind) dropped out of music college before they graduated.


And there's highly successful musicians who have higher education degrees (Brian May and Dexter Holland comes to mind)
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#21
Ask somewhere else. A lot of people on UG, to my experience, seem to be self-taught musicians of the mentality that being taught takes away individuality, and that a bachelor's degree in music is useless(It's not as broad as business or something like that, but it's not one-dimensional).

If you want, I'd be willing to give some suggestions if we can continue the conversation via PM.
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#22
Quote by Scopic
Be a session musician.

Apart from Nashville, the session scene has pretty much died out. There are still a handful of people doing it full-time, but they've been doing it a long time and are employed for that reason. You can still get some session work now and then, but it's no longer a full-time opportunity, and mainly a "I've got a mate who's good at slide blues, I'll call him up" type scenario.

There's still:

Teaching privately or in schools/colleges etc
Singer/songwriters, bands and DJs doing the rounds (and maybe working up to something big)
Function bands, playing weddings and business functions etc
Library music, where you send music to a company who TV/advert/film/game people go to for incidental music etc
Synchronisation ("sync"), where you write music specifically for TV and film, usually starting small
Sound designer
Music editor for films

Engineers, producers and remixers would probably find a production degree more useful.

All of these things will be helped more by reputation than degrees, but a degree could always be a way to help you stand out of the crowd, so long as you aren't a pompous dick about it.
Last edited by blue_strat at Aug 2, 2010,
#23
The fact of the matter is, lots of real-world experience looks a lot better on your resume then just a degree. Especially in the technical side of music.
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#24
a music degree is usually divided into a few tracks that you can choose from for example there can be performance, composition, and ethno-musicology. Each track focuses on their respective subjects and prepares you for different work in the field.

The performance track varies depending on which instrument you choose to focus on but is pretty self explanatory you would learn to play in ensembles of all types: choirs, orchestras, samba and gamelan percussion groups etc. this experience would allow you to join these groups professionally and be paid pretty well. My percussion professor teaches a few different classes while playing in groups, he makes a lot of paid trips to japan to play shows throughout the year usually on weekends.

Composition teaches you to compose for film, opera, tv, etc. you must learn the abilities and limitations of every instrument. if you plan on being a professional composer or conductor you bet you need a degree in it. if you consider how many shows, ads, movies are being seen or made everyday you understand that there is always work for good composers. The professors that i know that compose a lot also tend to travel and help conduct their pieces when they are played by high end orchestral groups. although they travel to a lesser degree than the performers.

The third track is usually theory and ethno-musicology. this is the study of music from different cultures. You must have a good grasp of the history of music in all genres and eras (although you are allowed to focus on one or two of your choice). These people usually become writers for magazines or their own books. Again the professors that i know in this field also travel a lot because they have to learn and experience different cultures so they can talk about them.

from what ive seen you cant just be a kid that plays guitar and expect to make it in anything other than a rock band (and thats a tiny chance in itself) in the music world. like all fields you need to study it in order to advance and be payed well. in short theirs plenty of jobs for musicians who study and i didnt even go into music production and engineering, instrument building, music law and music management each of which require different degrees. Hope this helped
#25
I am doing a music technology degree, even though my main passion is actually performance and playing guitar, i want to learn the tech side of it so that i would be a competent cadate for a studio engineering job or some other job in a studio, plus if (when) i join or make a band, i can do alot of the technical stuff myself rather than hire someone else to do it.

To be honest, these sorts of degrees are to make connections, get a stepping stone to a career, if you are good, and on good terms with your lecturers, they will probably recommend you to other people.

I really like writing as well, so some form of music journalism would be fun too, but i hear that it is pretty difficult to get into unless you are a brilliant writer, and more importantly, a vulture.
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#26
My buddy has a music degree.
He teaches at a couple of the universities around here and plays in an orchestra during the holidays.
#27
Let me see.....with a music degree, I'm sure it's more of a gateway type of deal. From there you could probably become a studio engineer, producer, composer.......I'm not really sure, but it could definitely open up a lot of possibilities.
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#30
To my knowledge, the only secure job you can get in the music field is teaching at a public school, most likely in an elementary school. Is your dream of being a professional musician really worth going to work everyday to watch a bunch of brats? And what if you never reach your dream? You'll end up being stuck in that school for life!

Music isn't really something that most people take seriously. They see it more as of a hobby than as a real job that would support you and your family. You could possibly make it in a touring band, but you don't need a degree for that!
#31
I have a degree in music. In production and musicology to be exact. I now work in a supermarket (ironically I got given the job of putting out the cd's...)

If there wasn't a recession on I'd be working a fairly generic office job in the ~20k salary range. Possibly in the media field, although that would be a lower earner.

Don't think of a degree as a meal ticket that'll get you all the jobs in the music industry, it's just a bit of refining. Most music jobs you'll get because you know somebody. In sub-areas such as studio production, talent and creativity don't mean sh*t - as one would suspect all the work goes to the socialites that have the contacts and make everyone sound like a viable corporate product.

In fact, most people with undergraduate degrees just go in for graduate positions in companies, and these schemes pretty generally don't care what field your degree is in; ergo you may as well study something you enjoy, rather than doing something piss-boring. Especially if the rest of your life is going to be piss-boring.

Of course, it is better to study something that gives you a trade, if you have an interest and an aptitude for it. In my case the flesh was strong but the will was weak. The media just isn't a trade in the same way that construction or doctoring or engineering is.

You aren't getting a degree that'll sure-fire set you up with a specific job afterwards. But I certainly don't regret what I chose to do, even the applied skills are only really useful right now as a hobby.

Hope this has been good advice.
Last edited by BrianApocalypse at Sep 13, 2010,