#1
I have been having a bit of pain or it might be cramp whilst playing "House of the Rising sun". It is at the meaty bottom part of my thumb and it is like a tired pain, I never have any trouble with it apart from playing this 1 song. I have been playing for around 2 years so I would think that the muscles in my hands should be built up enough to play this song, I think it is probably just down to bad technique but I am not sure how as my hand seems to be in the same position as it is when I play other songs or am just doing exercises.Any help or advice would be appreciated.

#3
It depends on what you mean by warm up. I do the 1 finger, 1 fret exercise for about 5 mins beforehand and then just go into it, are you saying I should like stretch out before, if so are there any stretches you would recommend?
#4
that`s nowhere near enough of a warm up ( you owe me a pick lol...1mm nylon...joking)

a good warm up takes 30 to 45 minutes but this is adjustable to fit your needs

think of playing a guitar as taking part in a marathon-you need to loosen up beforehand.

basically stretch the muscles gently in the neck, shoulders , back arms, wrists and fingers, with that out of the way (takes 10 min), you can pick up the guitar and start by playing every chord (less in your advanced player) you know gradually building up speed between changes and increasing the rhythm (you`ve got to excercise both hands) then you can move onto the chronomatic run you outlined, practice this for a minimum of 20 min along with some scales, that should get the blood flowing sufficiently for you to play comfortably.

the other thing that may be causing your pain is bad posture.
#6
Quote by ibanezgod1973
that`s nowhere near enough of a warm up ( you owe me a pick lol...1mm nylon...joking)

a good warm up takes 30 to 45 minutes but this is adjustable to fit your needs

think of playing a guitar as taking part in a marathon-you need to loosen up beforehand.

basically stretch the muscles gently in the neck, shoulders , back arms, wrists and fingers, with that out of the way (takes 10 min), you can pick up the guitar and start by playing every chord (less in your advanced player) you know gradually building up speed between changes and increasing the rhythm (you`ve got to excercise both hands) then you can move onto the chronomatic run you outlined, practice this for a minimum of 20 min along with some scales, that should get the blood flowing sufficiently for you to play comfortably.

the other thing that may be causing your pain is bad posture.


+1

Although I think you've invented a new word- "Chronomatic" should be "Chromatic". Probably a typo, I'm sure

You make this sound like warming up on guitar is comparable to training for the Olympics! Warming up is essential- don't get me wrong- but it's more important how loose you feel, rather than how long you do it for.

For example, on a cold day you're going to take longer than in the middle of summer (simply because it's not as warm, and you're colder when you start). It's important that you don't "push yourself" into playing when your fingers are too stiff, and that you wait for them to loosen up naturally before pushing yourself to your limits.

10 or 15 minutes is good; 20 is even better! If you're one us who struggles to find the time to practice I recommend doing at least 10 minutes to warm up....and you need to do some stretches and maybe some finger independence exercises would be good (one finger per fret "spider" exercises are great, but they are not the fastest way to warm-up).
#7
I will always have to warm up for longer than normal as I have light Raynaud's (circulation in hands and feet is poor, luckily for me it is not very bad) so about 15 minutes would be right for me in Summer I reckon.
#9
Cramps and pain are your body's gentle way of telling you that you're working too hard.
Warming up may help, or may not. There's no one prescription or solution for everyone. I never warm up.... And I'm old and feeble.
Other causes might be involved.
First, is your guitar set up properly? Many people buy an instrument and assume it's ready to play. Often, the action will be deliberately set high at the factory since the makers know that picky guitar players will want to adjust it to their liking.
A high action greatly increases your workload.

How is your playing position? If your wrist is excessively bent or you have developed some other habit regarding the way you hold the instrument, you can be greatly increasing your effort, and doing damage as well.
Finally, many folks fall into the habit of just applying too much pressure all the time, and holding chords like a clenched fist.
Experiment with how hard you actually need to hold the string down to get a clear tone. Work on relaxing between strums or notes when possible.