#2
suspect drugs
Lets jump in a pool


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Last edited by I am wet : Today at 03:26 XM.
#4
trial and error, experimentation man...you have to remember that was like 40 years ago as well when parts, etc. weren't as easy to come by as today.
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#5
Quote by RockGuitarist09
Hey
does anyone know how EVH came u with his famous Frankenstrat design?
Thanks.


Really depends what you mean by "design". There really is no design to it, it ended up that way after he took a few guitar parts, put them together and then modded it to hell and back over the years.
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#6
According to countless interviews, he couldn't find a guitar that was the way he liked, so he built one himself from bits he either found on other guitars or made himself. Just trial and error. Not sure how he came up with the famous EVH striped color scheme (or where he ripped it off from), though.
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#7
Cheap body and neck.. i think they weren't suitable for the factory to use. Took a Gibson PAF from a 335, i think. Rewound it. Didn't know how to wire the tone or the pickup selector so he wired straight to the volume and then to the output. One day he decided to put some electrical tape on it and spray paint it white. After a while, he realized the fender 6 screw tremolo wasn't cutting it for his tricks. Eventually, he was presented with the opportunity to test some of the first Floyd Rose bridges. After people copied his paint job, he decided to put tape on it again and paint it red this time. At some point, he put reflectors on the back (i think it was to reflect light from the stage into the crowd? Not sure about that), and added the 5150 on the front because of the 5150 studio.
#8
well, he was probably drunk and or high, built it, needed it to look cool, and with a serious lack of artistic skill went ape sh*t with some spray paint and dfferent colors of tape.

it just so happened to turn out amazing.

but doest that knd of thing really look like it was planned? its like a jackson pollock painting.

and yeah the guitar was messed as heck. randomly aquired parts, and he wired it himself. he didn know how to, so it only has one volume labeled "tone" and he wax potted the PAF humbucker himself. thats also why the strap buttons are eye hole screw things.

if you want to talk about a superb guitar, it was about as bad as it gets. it just so happens to have a great neck (think charvel), and a quality pickup....and it was played with legendary hands.

besides that, the rest of the guitar was garbage comared to a tom anderson, suhr, custom shop guitars, etc.
Last edited by ikey_ at Aug 2, 2010,
#9
You know all those guys on Harmony Central who spend their weekends taking photos of the guitars that they lovingly carve from super-high grade exotic woods not even available to the public? The guys who buy automotive airbrush painting setups so they can get perfect paint jobs on their guitars? Frankenstrat is what they would build if they preferred playing guitars to making them. Les Paul’s original log design is a similar example of this.
#12
He just did it randomly so people wouldnt copy his guitar design iirc. That certainly worked out well..
#13
From what heard, he decided to make his own guitar and cut out a basic shape, added his own pick ups, and then painted it, and put on those stripes by using coloured tape.

I guess he wanted his own original tone and could not find it by using guitars made by manufacturers, so he decided to make his own.

ron666
#14
Quote by ron666
From what heard, he decided to make his own guitar and cut out a basic shape, added his own pick ups, and then painted it, and put on those stripes by using coloured tape.

I guess he wanted his own original tone and could not find it by using guitars made by manufacturers, so he decided to make his own.

ron666


Actually I believe that the body and neck were both relatively cheap parts that felt good to him which he put together and gave about 2 or 3 different paintjobs over the years that added up to the look it has now.
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#15
is this a troll? he put random black and white stripes on a red guitar. i dont think he followed any kind of theorem in terms of coming up with the angles between the lines...
#16
Quote by kthxbi
is this a troll? he put random black and white stripes on a red guitar. i dont think he followed any kind of theorem in terms of coming up with the angles between the lines...


Not quite, he put red paint over tape on a black and white guitar and then took then tape off to get the gaps in the red.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Not quite, he put red paint over tape on a black and white guitar and then took then tape off to get the gaps in the red.

ok i apologize he put random tape over before painting. doesnt relli change that it was a random pattern.
#18
If I remember correctly he built it like that because he loved the feel of Fenders, and also loved the sound of Gibsons. So he basically built it to those specs.
As far as the colour scheme he probably just thought it looked cool like that.
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#19
Quote by Pac_man0123
Cheap body and neck.. i think they weren't suitable for the factory to use. Took a Gibson PAF from a 335, i think. Rewound it. Didn't know how to wire the tone or the pickup selector so he wired straight to the volume and then to the output. One day he decided to put some electrical tape on it and spray paint it white. After a while, he realized the fender 6 screw tremolo wasn't cutting it for his tricks. Eventually, he was presented with the opportunity to test some of the first Floyd Rose bridges. After people copied his paint job, he decided to put tape on it again and paint it red this time. At some point, he put reflectors on the back (i think it was to reflect light from the stage into the crowd? Not sure about that), and added the 5150 on the front because of the 5150 studio.


I'm pretty sure that was the reason. I was watching a video from a concert from the 5150 era, and at the end of the show he was using it to reflect the light into the crowd.

I also think he said that was the reason in an interview he did with Guitar world when Fender created the replicas of his strat.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#20
i've heard the rumor a few times that the body was a "boogie bodies" guitar body (which later became the company Warmoth). i've also heard that Kramer let him into their custom shop and he assembled and painted the guitar himself.

but one of the coolest things about the 5150 is the mysterious origin
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#22
i know how he painted it and what it was made from i was wondering if anyone knew how he came up with the colour scheme and stripes? did he just 'dream up' the famous pattern?
#24
this was on guitar world.com's article about the history of charvel:

Wayne opened Charvel’s Guitar Repair in 1974 in the Southern California town of Azusa. There, he continued to take on work from Fender, sell aftermarket parts and offer some custom services to the public. One noteworthy player who wandered into Charvel’s shop in the early Seventies was a young hotshot named Eddie Van Halen.

“Eddie came by the shop a lot and sometimes would sit on the floor and play the guitar while we repaired some of his other guitars,” Charvel recalls. “One day, Eddie came over to the shop and asked if I had an extra body and neck. I told him that I had an extra Boogie Body neck and an old body in my shop. I gave Ed the parts, and the next time I saw the guitar he had used a spray can to paint it white with black stripes. He used nails to hold the pickup in the body.”

This was the first of Eddie’s fabled “Frankenstein” guitars, as was featured prominently on Van Halen, the self-titled debut from Ed’s group. It eventually served as the template for the Grover Jackson–built black-and-yellow-striped Charvel superstrat that Ed can be seen holding on Van Halen II. Though Wayne couldn’t have imagined it at the time, his shop’s association with the guitarist would springboard Charvel’s success within a few years.

Although Wayne was well known for his paintwork, Charvel’s repair guru, Karl Sandoval was the shop’s main attraction. Sandoval is best known today as the innovator of Randy Rhoads’ polka dot V, but long before he worked on that guitar he was Charvel’s chief employee. Sandoval, who routinely worked on Van Halen’s guitars, introduced Eddie to Charvel’s shop and turned him on to using a Variac voltage-regulating device with his amps, something that Eddie has long credited with helping him create his signature “brown sound.”
#25
Quote by Pac_man0123
At some point, he put reflectors on the back (i think it was to reflect light from the stage into the crowd?

Nah, he found the reflectors on the street and put them on the guitar because he thought they would reflect light in a cool way.
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