#1
About a month ago I bought a Taylor 114ce. The very first day I owned it, my g string broke. I changed them to D'Addario .12's, which I probably would have done anyways since I didn't like the waxy feel of the Elixer's that were on it.

Since then I've broken the g, b, and high e strings several times, at least once each. They always break right at the tuning peg.

I used to play a Yamaha, and I never had this issue with that guitar. I go back and forth from the same tunings, play just about as much, and use the same strings. Do I need to go up a gauge? Change the brand? Could it be a problem with the guitar? (I really hope not... I paid a lot for it)

Thanks
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#2
the hole where the string goes into the tuning peg probably has sharp edges. you can file them so they r more rounded, or find a new set of pegs that are better
#3
check the nut for sharp edges and tight slots, check the saddle and the tuners. it's pretty much gotta be something touching or holding the strings - the 114 is a good guitar, and i've never heard of someone having this problem. since it's happening on multiple strings, i can't see it being the tuning pegs, but i suppose you never know.

assuming you bought it new, you could take/send it back and exchange it for another of the same guitar. you might also want to contact taylor service - i've heard great things about how responsive and helpful they are. they may pay to send it to local taylor authorized tech to have him/her sort the issue out.
Last edited by patticake at Aug 2, 2010,
#4
I have two Taylor guitars and have never broken a string on any of them - I bend the heck out of the strings on my T5. With an acoustic, we're talking about wood at the bridge contacting the string - I don't see how it can possibly be a sharp edge breaking the string. Are you sure it's not being tuned too high? Are you using standard tunings? Take it back to the shop where you bought and have them look at it. Most places will have no problem taking a look at the guitar for free - especially if it's breaking strings.

Edit: Helps to not misread... Breaking at the tuning pegs... If the strings are too tight in the nut, it will break strings. Take it back where you got it and explain the problem, or as Patti mentioned - contact Taylor. Call them. It's the only they way operate. Their customer service is excellent.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Aug 2, 2010,
#5
Had the same thing with high E string-after 3rd I checked the edge of tuning peg hole and it was little jagged so I gently filed the hole's edge with very fine stone(had some small sharpening stick).It's OK since.
#6
Quote by dimarzio77
the hole where the string goes into the tuning peg probably has sharp edges. you can file them so they r more rounded, or find a new set of pegs that are better


I've visually inspected the tuning pegs, nut, bridge, basically anything that touches the string. I don't think that's an issue (but you never know, it could be too small to see).

Quote by patticake
check the nut for sharp edges and tight slots, check the saddle and the tuners. it's pretty much gotta be something touching or holding the strings - the 114 is a good guitar, and i've never heard of someone having this problem. since it's happening on multiple strings, i can't see it being the tuning pegs, but i suppose you never know.

assuming you bought it new, you could take/send it back and exchange it for another of the same guitar. you might also want to contact taylor service - i've heard great things about how responsive and helpful they are. they may pay to send it to local taylor authorized tech to have him/her sort the issue out.


I did buy it new from Guitar center, but I've moved since then. Do you by chance know if another guitar center would take it? I will also try contacting taylor before thinking about exchanging it.

Quote by KG6_Steven
I have two Taylor guitars and have never broken a string on any of them - I bend the heck out of the strings on my T5. With an acoustic, we're talking about wood at the bridge contacting the string - I don't see how it can possibly be a sharp edge breaking the string. Are you sure it's not being tuned too high? Are you using standard tunings? Take it back to the shop where you bought and have them look at it. Most places will have no problem taking a look at the guitar for free - especially if it's breaking strings.

Edit: Helps to not misread... Breaking at the tuning pegs... If the strings are too tight in the nut, it will break strings. Take it back where you got it and explain the problem, or as Patti mentioned - contact Taylor. Call them. It's the only they way operate. Their customer service is excellent.


I use three tunings:
Standard
One half step down
C-G-D-G-D-D

only one of which involves tuning any strings up. The last time a string broke was actually while tuning the B string back DOWN to standard. So I don't know if that's it or not. The yamaha never had problems going between tunings.
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#7
The guys above are likely right; most all breakage of new strings is caused by some sort of sharp edge.
If it's breaking at the tuning peg; I wonder if you are attaching the string properly when putting on new strings. When properly wound, there should be no direct strain on the string at the hole; all the strain should be at the rounded part of the tuner's shaft.

Have a look:
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/Stringing/ststringing1.html
#8
I've visually inspected the tuning pegs, nut, bridge, basically anything that touches the string. I don't think that's an issue (but you never know, it could be too small to see).
Just to make sure, take an emery board and get in any groove or slot a string would go. May be on the inside, too.

Off topic for a sec, I see you're in Syracuse. Shoot me a PM if you're still around here.
#9
I would bet the nut isn't set up for the strings you are using. I would take it to the guitar store and have them fix it.

If the groove is too small for the string, the string will bind and the most likely place for it to break is at the tuning peg.