#1
I've got a basic recording studio, where my band practices, it's not huge, but it's big enough. At the back of the room we have the drum kit, and either side of the kit, we have the pa speakers, opposite from the drums, we have the amps at the other side of the room. The problem is, when we play, the mics pick up the noise from the guitars and feedback like a bitch, so how can we get round this, is there like a pedal or something that can keep the mic switched off when we aren't singing into it or something like that? Or is my space just too small for mics?
Gibson SG Standard, Gibson SG 60s tribute, Edwards Les Paul, Fender Telecaster, Epiphone SG Custom
#2
You might like to try turning the gain (sensitivity) of the mics down.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#3
The pa we use doesn't have gain, just a volume, bass, treble and reverb for each channell and a master volume.
Gibson SG Standard, Gibson SG 60s tribute, Edwards Les Paul, Fender Telecaster, Epiphone SG Custom
#4
The Volume should be the input gain on the PA.
Are the speakers behind the drum kit pointing at the drum mics? (If you're miking the drums that is)
#5
The PA speakers are next to the drums, and no, we're not micing the drums, it's only practicing atm.
Gibson SG Standard, Gibson SG 60s tribute, Edwards Les Paul, Fender Telecaster, Epiphone SG Custom
#6
So your band setup is have the drums at the back, then the guitars etc in front, and then all your amps are facing you? And your mix speakers are behind you? If I am understanding this right, then this is a pretty odd setup.

A good tip: you should never have mics facing into speakers (that you don't want to mic obviously), even if they are metres away. Turn the mics around and see/hear the difference.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#8
Here's the set up more clearly, the room is rectangle shaped, at one end, the drum kit is there, with the pa speakers next to it, on the opposite side, the amps face the drum kit.
Gibson SG Standard, Gibson SG 60s tribute, Edwards Les Paul, Fender Telecaster, Epiphone SG Custom
#9
You really should have your PA speakers down the other end of the room, next to the amps. Then have your singer (the whole band, matter of fact) face into the speakers, so that the mic is pointed away from them towards the rear of the room. This should solve your problems unless you turn the track volume waaay up.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#11
Facing guitar amps away from your PA mains would fix a lot of the feeback...and not standing in front of them with a mic too.