#1
I was looking on the Seymour Duncan website and came across the Triple Shot. I'm going to be wanting some way to toggle to single coil mode on my humbuckers and am wondering if Triple Shot does that or if it is something else.

I'm pretty new to guitar customizing/equipment stuff, and am just wondering if I should look into the triple shot or if I am confused here (which I probably am either way).

Thanks.
#2
It does Series (Normal Humbucker), Parallel (Both coils running independently), and coil splits, allowing for either coil to be turned on.


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#3
Does it only work with SD Pickups? And what is the advantage of using a Triple Shot over installing a switch yourself? Is it just that it's more convenient?

My guitar has two volume knobs and one tone knob and one pickup-selector. Without a Triple Shot would I have to drill a hole in the guitar to install a coil split selector or something?

Thanks.
#4
Advantages:

A lot more versatile than simply toggle switches or push-pulls with the same controls.
Small.
Built in to the pickup ring already, so no routing required.

Disadvantages:

Smaller, so harder to hit quickly.
Possibly a bit pricier than switches, although still not horribly expensive.


No, it will work with any pickup with 4 conductor wiring, although you would have to be able to realize that the color coding would be different. And if you don't want anything crazy, it's very convenient.

Without it, you'd need 3 push pulls to do all the things it does, and it would probably have dead spots if not though out correctly. Although you could do a series/parallel with just one push pull, this gives you the option of actual coil splitting too.

With other switches, you could probably do it with 2, although you would still have to drill holes.


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#5
Quote by fixationdarknes
Does it only work with SD Pickups?
No, it'll work with any humbucker with four conductor wiring:
For use with nearly any humbucker pickups with four-conductor cable: Seymour Duncan or otherwise. It is the perfect match for the P-Rails.


Quote by fixationdarknes
And what is the advantage of using a Triple Shot over installing a switch yourself? Is it just that it's more convenient? My guitar has two volume knobs and one tone knob and one pickup-selector. Without a Triple Shot would I have to drill a hole in the guitar to install a coil split selector or something?

Thanks.
It just makes it more convinient and gives you less of an impact to the look of your instrument. You could do it yourself with push pulls, switches etc, but this just makes it easier in regards to wiring and also to understand how it works (like it's function, which pickup it affects).
I have a ponytail fetish.
..And a labcoat fetish. SCIENCE!
#6
Alright thanks for the info. And so if I don't go the triple shot route, my only option is to drill hole(s) into my guitar? Could I turn one of my three knobs (two volumes and 1 master tone) into the push/pull for a parallel/series switch? I probably want to avoid hole-drilling if possible, but I don't think I necessarily need all the versatility that is offered in the triple shot.

Is the triple shot not very common? I've never actually heard anything about it before today when I just accidentally came across it on the SD website XD
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Aug 3, 2010,
#7
I actualy haven't ever seen anyone with the triple shot installed, so i don't think they're THAT common. but SD still makes them, so I guess they still sell enough to break even

but yeah, you can replace any of your current control pots with a push/pull to give you series/parallel.
keep in mind that a single push/pull only has enough poles to change from series to parallel on one pickup. so you'd need one for the neck pickup and one for the bridge pickup.

also, if you have a switch to put a humbucker in series/parallel, i don't see a huge advantage in including coil splitting options, since they sound kinda similar anyway
Last edited by james4 at Aug 3, 2010,
#8
It's not wicked common, but that is just because you could pay the $10 for a push pull pot to get a series parallel/coil split vs $20 to have both, when both is not really needed.

And yes, you can put a push pull or two in your guitar for series/parallels, just head on over to the wiring thread if you need a diagram


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#9
Sweet. You guys are really helpful I really appreciate it.

And one more thing - let's say I do put in one or two push-pull switches for a parallel/series, and I replace one of the volume knobs and the tone knob to do that. Now I'd have one volume knob left. Am I just not able to control the tone and volume on one of the pickups anymore? Or does the one volume knob get turned into a master volume knob or something?

Thanks!
#10
A push pull doesnt affect what the pot does. It is exactly the same as having a normal pot as well as a toggle switch elsewhere on the guitar. A push-pull is slightly more expensive than this option, but you wont have to drill an extra hole. If you wire up a push/pull pot on the tone for series parallel, you will have a normal tone control, but when pulled up, you will get parallel pickups, while keeping the tone control.
#12
Yeah, the push pull is a pot with a switch built in, so you could do a 2 vol, 1 tone, then have the two volume pots, or a volume and a tone, when pulled, puts a pickup in parallel.

and if anyone cares, or wants a diagram, I have this switch, a small 4 position slider switch to do everything the Triple Shot can do, and still can have a phase switch added after, allowing all 4 positions (series, parallel, north coil, and south coil) to be put out of phase.

Based on the datasheet, the overall length of the switch, as in the metal casing, is 18mm or .709in, so it's pretty small and stealthy too.

EDIT: also will be working on a 6 postion and 7 postion one, for a possible Coils Parallel out of phase (with each other), coils series out of phase, and possibly a "pickup off"


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Last edited by MonkeyLink07 at Aug 3, 2010,
#13
Okay cool. Also, are there certain humbuckers that will be better/more inclined toward sounding good in parallel than others? I'm thinking the Seymour Duncan SH-2 or SH-1 (neck position) might have a push-pull installed for it, if that would work. Basically, I'm mainly going for some really nice and articulate power metal-ish lead tones. Any input?
Last edited by fixationdarknes at Aug 3, 2010,